Boris Johnson rules out meat and carbon taxes

first_img whatsapp However, Johnson tonight ruled out carbon taxes for consumers, which currently only apply for major companies, and instead told The Sun that the government will “generate high quality, high skill, high wage jobs.” Tom Saunders In light of the government’s target of carbon neutrality by 2050 there were suggestion the UK government may introduce taxes on meat or carbon in the future to incentivise greener alternatives. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has categorically ruled out introducing new levies on meat or carbon despite his net zero targets. (Photo by Christopher Furlong – WPA Pool/Getty Images) Also Read: Boris Johnson rules out meat and carbon taxes ahead of COP26 climate pledges Monday 1 March 2021 8:19 pm There’s pressure on the Prime Minister to intensify efforts to mitigate climate change due to the UK hosting the COP26 conference in November. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has categorically ruled out introducing new levies on meat or carbon despite his net zero targets. (Photo by Christopher Furlong – WPA Pool/Getty Images) Share Last month Johnson also distanced himself from a Whitehall plan to institute a tax on meat, designed by Treasury officials looking at ways to tax commodities that require carbon intensive production. During a visit to a primary school in Stoke-on-Trent last week he told The Sun that the UK “can be the centre of battery innovation in this part of the world.” Prime Minister Boris Johnson has categorically ruled out introducing new levies on meat or carbon despite his net zero targets, according to an interview he gave The Sun.center_img Show Comments ▼ Tags: Boris Johnson Green energy Tax The event will see the world’s leaders descend on Glasgow for the latest round of the United Nations’ ongoing climate change negotiations. The prime minister added that he believed that the UK’s carbon neutral future would be spurred on by innovation in green technology. More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.com by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBrake For ItSay Goodbye: These Cars Will Be Discontinued In 2021Brake For ItMoneyWise.comMechanics Say You Should Avoid These Cars In 2021  MoneyWise.comPost FunGreat Songs That Artists Are Now Embarrassed OfPost FunLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthTaco RelishSuspicious Pics That Are Fishier Than The SeaTaco RelishAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorThe Legacy ReportMan Who Predicted 2020 Crash 45 Days Early Issues Next Major WarningThe Legacy ReportIkaria BeautyYou Need To Do This If You Have Sunken Jowls (Just Once A Day – It’s Genius)Ikaria BeautyMagellan TimesIf You See A Red Ball On A Power Line, Here’s What It MeansMagellan Times Boris Johnson rules out meat and carbon taxes ahead of COP26 climate pledges Prime Minister Boris Johnson has categorically ruled out introducing new levies on meat or carbon despite his net zero targets. (Photo by Christopher Furlong – WPA Pool/Getty Images) Also Read: Boris Johnson rules out meat and carbon taxes ahead of COP26 climate pledges whatsapplast_img read more


NHS to deliver vaccines to low-uptake communities in a Ford van

first_img“This added mobility has meant the gap will be bridged for so many facing a struggle to visit their local vaccination centre. With this support, we enter an important chapter of our vaccine rollout with a renewed sense of hope and optimism,” Patel added. Ford and the NHS in Essex have joined forces with local health leaders to roll out a vaccine drive using a tailored Transit van to deliver jabs. Millie Turner Show Comments ▼ Despite the UK’s successful vaccine rollout, vaccine uptake is lower among some communities facing access challenges, which the vaccine drive seeks to tackle. Share Driving across Essex from next month, areas of low uptake will be targeted, particularly communities experiencing homelessness, ethnically diverse communities, travelling communities and unregistered patients. whatsapp Overall, vaccine intake has been strong with 19 out of 20 people aged 50 and over already opting for the jab. “Our goal of giving everyone an equal opportunity to receive this essential vaccine is now in closer reach, owing to the additional support from our valued network of community leaders,” clinical director at Benfleet Primary Care Network in Essex, Dr Smitesh Patel, said. The bespoke vehicle, converted by West Yorkshire-based specialist vehicle builders, Venari Group, includes medical-grade refrigeration with WIFI monitoring capability, vaccine transport coolers, a collapsible chair for administering vaccines, including a built-in tablet for accessing health and vaccination records. The Ford Transit will be a hub for dedicated vaccine clinics on the grounds of churches, mosques and other community venues, as the NHS and partners across the Mid and South Essex Health and Care Partnership liaise with community groups to fill pre-booked appointments. NHS to deliver vaccines to low-uptake communities in a Ford van whatsapp Jahirur Rahmn, aged 62, from Essex, receives the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine inside a tailored Ford Transit (Photo: John Nguyen/PA Wire) Also Read: NHS to deliver vaccines to low-uptake communities in a Ford van Friday 7 May 2021 8:40 am Jahirur Rahmn, aged 62, from Essex, receives the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine inside a tailored Ford Transit (Photo: John Nguyen/PA Wire) Also Read: NHS to deliver vaccines to low-uptake communities in a Ford van Jahirur Rahmn, aged 62, from Essex, receives the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine inside a tailored Ford Transit (Photo: John Nguyen/PA Wire) Jahirur Rahmn, aged 62, from Essex, receives the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine inside a tailored Ford Transit (Photo: John Nguyen/PA Wire) Also Read: NHS to deliver vaccines to low-uptake communities in a Ford van “Over the coming weeks, this Ford Transit will make some incredibly important journeys as a vaccination van. Working with the NHS and community leaders to deliver this brilliant scheme and bolster the exemplary vaccine rollout, has been a privilege,” director of Commercial Vehicles at Ford, Mandy Dean, said. After combatting scepticism, the number of people from ethnic minority backgrounds taking the vaccine offers up has more than tripled over the last two months. Tags: Coronavirus Covid-19 a year on NHS Vaccinelast_img read more


Supreme Court Orders More Briefs On Birth Control, Hoping To Prevent Tie

first_imgHealthSupreme Court Orders More Briefs On Birth Control, Hoping To Prevent TieMarch 29, 2016 by Nina Totenberg, NPR News Share:Supporters of religious organizations that want to ban contraceptives from their health insurance policies on religious grounds rallied outside the Supreme Court last week.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court has ordered more legal briefs in the birth control case it heard last week, indicating that the justices are struggling to avoid another 4-4 tie. The case tests the religious liberty claims against the Obamacare mandate for birth control in all health insurance plans.Some faith-based nonprofits — like hospitals, universities and service organizations — object to signing an opt-out form on the grounds that that action triggers the insurer’s providing birth control coverage separately. At the oral argument last week, several of the conservative justices said the requirement “hijacked” the religious employers’ insurance plans, and a 4-4 tie seemed likely.In an apparent attempt to prevent a deadlock, the court on Tuesday afternoon asked the government and the religious objectors to address a specific question: whether birth control coverage for employees could be obtained without involving faith-based employers at all; and the court offered a specific suggestion for doing so.In an unusually detailed order, the court asked whether it would be possible to have objecting nonprofits notify their insurers that they do not want to have their plan cover contraception that they are opposed to, and upon receiving this notification, the insurer would separately notify employees that the insurance company will provide the coverage on its own.The additional briefs are to be filed by April 20. The government undoubtedly will have to consult with insurance companies to see what health plans can do without adding significant administrative costs. And one of the issues bound to concern the health insurers is where the requirement for separate coverage will end. For instance, what about religious nonprofits that object to blood transfusions, or vaccines, or numerous other medical procedures?Tuesday’s order for more briefs likely stems from the concerns of Justice Anthony Kennedy, who was among those who called the Obamacare opt-out a “hijacking ” of the religious objectors’ plans at the oral argument last week. He seemed at the time to be grasping for an alternative; but if he is ultimately persuaded there is not a good one, he would likely join the court’s four liberals and make a five-vote majority for upholding the current opt-out provision.If, on the other hand, he is persuaded there is a good alternative, the liberal justices could either join him or there would be a 4-4 tie. The result of a tie would be that in most of the country, where the opt-out provision has been upheld by the lower courts, the opt-out provision would be the law; but in the states governed by the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals, which struck down the provision, the opt-out measure would be voided. The states in the 8th Circuit are Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota.Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.Share this story:last_img read more


News / Box shortages, congestion and high rates now hitting China-Europe rail

first_img China-Europe rail freight rates have leaped five-fold on the back of “extreme” demand and lack of equipment.Furthermore, a container backlog on China’s border with Khazakstan (Alashankou and Khorgos) has prompted a temporary suspension of some westbound services.Geodis said that from Tuesday, “all westbound trains from China to Europe have been suspended. The eastbound rail route from Europe to China is running as usual, but we expect certain delays in stretch from the CIS and China border crossing.”It told customers: “Space on the westbound service is extremely tight, shipments are being accepted based on firm bookings, depending on the availability of space and equipment.“Due to extremely strong demand for space on the westbound service, we request all potential bookings to be checked with us, case by case.”The Loadstar recently reported how rail volumes were approaching full capacity on the back of space constraints in air and ocean, while delays caused by military movements at the Kazakh-China border were adding to the congestion. However, a row over Covid restrictions between the two sides may also be to blame.According to a report by the International Railway Journal, a dispute over quarantine measures led to both China and Khazakstan limiting the number of trains crossing the border.But Rob Foster, business development manager for central and north China at Norman Global Logistics, said congestion, rather than suspended services, was the main problem.“There’s a huge backlog on the border, with the carriers unable to cope with the volume of rail wagons,” he told The Loadstar.“We are seeing westbound rates of anything from $6,000 to $10,000 per 40ft high-cube in the last week, which is four or five times the rate this time last year. And carriers won’t even guarantee the space at those prices.”Mr Foster said a “significant lack” of equipment was also a key issue, especially out of China.“The shipping lines have had a substantial part in causing this issue by manipulating the ocean freight market, which has affected all services. Carriers have been loading smaller vessels for months now and throw blank sailings into the mix, slowly building the pressure. Rail carriers have some containers, but lots are shared and leased still.”He pointed out that rail services had “exploded” in recent years from a few services a week to hundreds a month, putting considerable pressure on the network.Indeed, the latest figures for Alashankou, for example, show a 42% increase, to 4,500 train journeys this year, while services across the entire China-Europe network have exceeded 10,000.Mr Foster confirmed there weren’t any issues for eastbound trains, but was sceptical of the prospect of using road freight along the Silk Road as an alternative to bring cargo into Europe.“It was working a couple of months ago, but some drivers have tested positive for Covid during border crossings, which we hear has caused a lot of services to be suspended,” he explained. By Sam Whelan 11/12/2020last_img read more


Dude, where’s my regulatory framework? As CBD gains popularity, Washington struggles to keep up

first_img Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Tags CongressDonald Trumpgovernment agenciesmarijuanapharmaceuticals [email protected] Politics A hemp plant MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/Getty Images @NicholasFlorko Log In | Learn More What’s included? Dude, where’s my regulatory framework? As CBD gains popularity, Washington struggles to keep up Nicholas Florkocenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” WASHINGTON — Online reviews proclaim CBD a “life changer,” “the best thing ever,” and “truly incredible.” It’s a $390 million industry, expected to grow to at least $1.3 billion by 2022. Montel Williams has his own designer line of CBD products; so do Tommy Chong and Mike Tyson.Despite the rave reviews, CBD is giving Washington a major headache. The Food and Drug Administration has different rules for regulating medicines and dietary supplements like vitamins — and it isn’t perfectly clear yet which category CBD, or cannabidiol, an extract of cannabis used as a home remedy for everything from anxiety to back pain, falls into. Congress, too, has struggled. Lawmakers passed a bill last year that officially legalized hemp, the plant from which CBD is extracted, but left the FDA with little guidance on how to regulate CBD. What is it? By Nicholas Florko May 17, 2019 Reprints GET STARTED About the Author Reprintslast_img read more


Naples City Hall evacuated to investigate suspicious item

first_imgA few of the streets around City Hall were blocked off while detectives investigated.The Collier County Sheriff’s Office bomb squad assisted in the investigation. A City Hall employee notified law enforcement after finding the item. It is unknown at this time what the item was. COLLIER COUNTY, Fla.– The Naples Police Department investigated a suspicious item discovered at City Hall, Tuesday morning. After a few hours, detectives were able to speak with the person who left the item behind and say it was a misunderstanding. City Hall staff have been able to return to the building after being evacuated from the building. PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Study ranks Naples as best beach town in America to live June 16, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement Sea turtle caught on camera nesting on Naples beach June 16, 2021 Advertisement Mosquitoes swarming Collier County, crews trap 25,000 in two nights June 17, 2021 Amazon distribution center officially opens in Collier County June 16, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementTags: collier countynaplesSuspiciouslast_img read more


Standard Life temporarily suspends new sales of GMWBs

Facebook LinkedIn Twitter IE Staff The insurer believes that its decision is a responsible one for its clients, advisors and the business given the current economic and regulatory environments. “Our industry is challenged by historically low interest rates, market volatility and strengthened regulatory capital requirements,” says Sylvain Messier, vice president, strategy and development at Standard Life. Since guaranteed minimum withdrawal benefit products were introduced in Canada in 2006, several industry players altered their products. The first companies to offer GMWBs, including Manulife Financial Corp., Sun Life Financial Inc. and Desjardins Financial Security have re-engineered their products to help deal with capital-adequacy concerns caused by changing market and regulatory conditions. GMWB features are changing “Standard Life believes that another round of changes to this type of product is inevitable. Under these conditions, we are suspending new sales of our GLWB and concentrating on solutions that address client needs and meet advisor expectations over the long term,” adds Messier. The suspension will remain in effect until the economic and regulatory environments improve. In the meantime, Standard Life says it will continue to explore alternatives. Standard Life says its segregated fund offering is core to the company’s retail business and remains a significant driver for growth. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Standard Life Assurance Co. of Canada is temporarily suspending new sales of Ideal Income Series, its guaranteed lifetime withdrawal benefit product (GLWB), effective April 16. The Montreal-based company made the announcement on Wednesday. Keywords Guaranteed Minimum Withdrawal BenefitCompanies Standard Life Assurance Co. Great-West to focus on growth opportunities Related news read more


Panel: Segregation still ‘in force’ in US schools, neighborhoods

first_imgPanel: Segregation still ‘in force’ in US schools, neighborhoods Civil rights legislation and Supreme Court rulings have undone a history of legal racial segregation in America, but schools and neighborhoods remain largely segregated, four Cornell faculty members said during the Nov. 19 webinar, “Racism in America: Education and Housing.”“Segregation is not today enshrined in law, but it is in force,” said Noliwe Rooks, the W.E.B. Du Bois Professor and director of the American Studies Program in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S). “We rarely talk much, outside this panel, about segregation. As a result, many of us may think it’s gone away. But segregation is still very much with us.”The webinar, attended by more than 800 people, was the second in the yearlong “Racism in America” series, hosted by A&S and supported by Alumni Affairs and Development, eCornell and Diversity Alumni Programs.Adam Harris, a staff writer for The Atlantic who covers education and national politics, moderated a wide-ranging discussion of residential and educational segregation along racial lines.In addition to Rooks, panelists were Kendra Bischoff, associate professor of sociology (A&S); Sergio Garcia-Rios, assistant professor of government (A&S); and Daniel Lichter, the Ferris Family Professor of Policy Analysis and Management in the College of Human Ecology and faculty affiliate of the Cornell Population Center.In America, Bischoff said, education and housing are inextricably linked to each other and to underlying social structures – the enduring and regular arrangements in society beyond the control of individuals.“Racial segregation in schools and housing is supported by large income and wealth differences between white and nonwhite populations,” Bischoff said, adding that the American public education system is highly fragmented, with approximately 13,500 school districts across the 50 states.“Where you live matters in so many ways,” said Lichter, who studies marginalized rural populations, including immigrant communities and reservations, which are “segregated, isolated and mostly invisible,” he said.“Rural segregation and isolation is a direct result of legacies of slavery, racial oppression including land grabs of all sorts, and violence, the effects of which persist to this day,” Lichter said. “Racial inequality is built into our political and economic systems. It’s hard to change.”Yet many immigrants to America seek positive change in the form of better education, Garcia-Rios said, noting that polls show education matters to and has mobilized Latinos.The terms “Hispanic” and “Latino” came to exist, Garcia-Rios said, precisely because of the mobilization of marginalized and segregated communities that united to fight for bilingual education and other causes, “making it possible for this very diverse group of people to come together under one umbrella.”Coming from these different points of view, the panelists agreed that economic disparities both contribute to and result from segregation.“I call this ‘segrenomics,’” Rooks said, “and I think this mashup of segregation and economics is one of the underexplored reasons we can’t end segregation and move our justice needle forward.”But if federal legislation aimed to root out racial segregation in housing and education – starting with the Civil Rights Act of 1964 – has not moved that needle, Harris asked the panel, what can be done? And what have communities tried?Well-off school districts have historically resisted federal government intervention in schools, Rooks said. “It almost has to come from the bottom up, it almost has to come neighborhood to neighborhood,” she said.Because federal government policy doesn’t do well on the micro level, she said, “I think there could be some creative ways that we redefine relationships between the federal government and the local, keeping equity central,” Rooks said, citing District 15 in Brooklyn, New York, where parents “met for years” to make education in their district more equitable.School choice programs can unlink residence from education, Bischoff said, but don’t change the underlying patterns of residential segregation.“On the macro scale, housing policy is a necessary part of that solution in order to change the underlying condition of residential segregation,” Bischoff said, suggesting zoning changes and programs to develop more affordable housing in high-opportunity areas.Even segregated groups are influenced by the communities in which they live, Garcia-Rios said. He expressed hope for Latino communities, including immigrants, integrating with the places where they move for job opportunities.“As more immigrants move to areas that were mostly white,” he said, “first we’ll see a negative reaction, but then incorporation and integration.”In his studies, Lichter has witnessed connections between integration and economic growth in small towns where an influx of immigrants – some Hispanic but also those from parts of Asia and Africa – brought with them positive implications for school districts.“The growth of more diverse communities – I call them ‘global small towns’ – actually lifts up the community overall,” Lichter said, adding that while local elites, usually white, resist at first, fearing for jobs, “in the end, some of those fears don’t seem to be realized. There seems to be a multiplier effect.“I always say diversity starts from the bottom up,” he said. “It starts with the kids.”The Racism in America website contains additional resources on these topics. Webinars planned for spring 2021 will discuss protest movements and civil disobedience; health care inequalities; and race and the economy.Kate Blackwood is a writer for the College of Arts and Sciences. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:affordable housing, Blackwood, Brooklyn, community, Cornell University, diversity, education, federal government, Government, Government policy, immigrants, inequality, legislation, Professor, research, resources, Supreme Court, university, Yorklast_img read more


New Bio-Wash Facility For Bendigo

first_imgNew Bio-Wash Facility For Bendigo VIC PremierTrain passengers in regional Victoria are set to benefit with construction beginning on a new bio-wash facility at the Bendigo Station precinct which will ensure more reliable services across the regional rail network.Due to the regional rail network spanning all corners of the state, unfortunately animal strikes can be a common occurrence with figures showing more than 100 strikes in a month can occur at times when wildlife is more active.V/Line currently has access to one bio-wash facility at South Dynon, near Southern Cross Station, so the construction of this additional facility in regional Victoria will help speed up the process to ensure trains can return to service sooner. It will also help cater for the growing number of new trains, which have been rolled out onto the regional network in recent years.The new $7.9 million indoor facility will be delivered by Coleman Rail and will feature state-of-the-art cleaning equipment and elevated railing, allowing staff to complete thorough inspections and clean all parts of a train before it returns to service.The Bendigo line has the highest number of animal strikes in the state, so this facility will enable trains that experience a strike on-route to Bendigo to be cleaned prior to operating another, with less disruption than if it had to return to the facility in Melbourne for cleaning.V/Line will also use the facility to clean trains from other parts of the network that don’t require immediate cleaning.The bio-wash facility will be built in the train stabling area near Bendigo Station that is not currently being used for services and is expected to create 50 jobs during the construction phase.Once finished, the facility will be leased to V/Line’s train maintenance provider Alstom to manage. Alstom has an agreement for cleaning at the facility to be completed by Bendigo Rail Workshops’ staff, creating another five to eight ongoing local jobs.As stated by Minister for Public Transport Ben Carroll“The Bendigo bio-wash facility will help trains get back on the tracks faster after an incident, which is vital in delivering reliable services for passengers on the Bendigo line and across the regional rail network.”“As we continue to bring more trains onto the regional network, it’s equally important that we’re investing in the infrastructure to support that growth.” As stated by Member for Bendigo East Jacinta Allan“Animal strikes are unavoidable but can be incredibly frustrating for local passengers — having a biowash facility in Bendigo is a great investment that also supports local jobs.” As stated by Member for Bendigo West Maree Edwards“These upgrades will ensure trains can return to service sooner, giving passengers in regional Victoria a more reliable service.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:agreement, animal, AusPol, Australia, Bendigo, Carroll, Government, incident, infrastructure, Investment, Melbourne, Minister, public transport, southern, Southern Cross, strike, Transport, Victoria, wildlifelast_img read more


Ballot Initiatives On Public Education Funding Topic Of Oct. 16 CU-Boulder Forum

first_imgThe University of Colorado at Boulder will host a public panel discussion on Monday, Oct. 16, about Amendment 39 and Referendum J, two November ballot initiatives that could change how Colorado funds public schools. Co-sponsored by the Education and Public Interest Center in CU-Boulder’s School of Education and the Colorado Children’s Campaign, the panel discussion will be held from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Old Main Chapel on the Boulder campus. Both measures would direct all school districts in the state to spend 65 percent of their operating expenses on classroom instruction and services that directly affect student achievement, according to Kevin Welner, an associate professor in the School of Education and moderator of the panel discussion. However, the measures have different definitions of which operating expenses are included and excluded from the 65 percent, he said. “There is significant debate about the potential impact of these initiatives on district programs and services, and this is an opportunity to hear from both opponents and proponents of the measures,” Welner said. Panelists at the forum will include Frank Waterous of the Bell Policy Center, Tony Salazar of the Colorado Education Association, state Rep. Joe Stengel, R-Littleton, and Alex Medler of Colorado Children’s Campaign. For more information call (303) 492-8370. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 10, 2006 last_img read more