Does Thin = Cloud? Not necessarily

first_imgSo what about rich clients? We happen to think that they are perfectly suited to cloud computing. Maybe our latest whitepaper on Better Together: Rich Clients and Cloud Computing can help set the record straight – or at least prompt some alternate thinking. In a recent TechRepublic article, Jason Hiner asks: Are Netbooks quietly driving us to Thin Clients and Cloud Computing?Of course, the article is primarily about netbooks and how wonderful they are. No argument here. But the question of thin versus cloud has popped up in an interesting way. Thin is important because of the nature of the netbook but what does that have to do with cloud computing? Not all cloud applications are thin. Perhaps the logic is as follows:If cloud then we are delivering services over the internetIf internet then we must be using a browserIf browser then the computing must be taking place in the backend with only the UI distributed to the client deviceTherefore all cloud devices must be thinlast_img read more


Cancelo: ‘Walker above and beyond’

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Joao Cancelo thanked Kyle Walker for “going above and beyond for the team” by taking the gloves in a 1-1 draw with Atalanta, but felt Manchester City were hard done by. With Ederson injured in the first half and Claudio Bravo sent off for taking down Josip Ilicic, Walker had to go in goal. “Going in goal is not my speciality! Kyle Walker showed a great attitude and he really went above and beyond for the team,” Cancelo told Sky Sport Italia. “It was a difficult moment, we needed someone to step up and Kyle did very well. After seeing the VAR, I think it’s impossible that the red card was given, because he didn’t touch Ilicic at all. This is not fair. “It was a deserved point, we are top of the group, have two games left and will try to do our best.” After his experiences in Serie A, how is Joao Cancelo finding his first season at Manchester City? “I am learning a lot with this coach, who I feel is the best in the world. I came here to work with Pep Guardiola and become the best.”last_img read more


9 months agoWoodward and Man Utd board warming to Solskjaer stay

first_imgWoodward and Man Utd board warming to Solskjaer stayby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveOle Gunnar Solskjaer is edging closer to being named permanent manager at Manchester United.Chief Ed Woodward and United’s hierarchy have been wowed by the Norwegian’s 100 per cent start, says The Sun.The executive vice-chairman went into the Wembley dressing room after the 1-0 victory against Spurs to congratulate Solskjaer on the job he is doing.The Old Trafford powerbrokers initially only had Tottenham coach Mauricio Pochettino in their sights.But former striker Solskjaer’s record-breaking six wins from his first six games has hugely impressed them.Now the clamour for him to get the job permanently is growing not only among the fans and players but in the boardroom, too. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


10 days agoChelsea defensive duo Christensen, Emerson doubtful for Newcastle

first_imgChelsea defensive duo Christensen, Emerson doubtful for Newcastleby Freddie Taylor10 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveAndreas Christensen and Emerson are doubtful for Chelsea’s clash with Newcastle United on Saturday, according to Goal.Emerson has been out of action since September with a hamstring problem, but he has not officially been ruled out of facing the Magpies.Christensen picked up a hamstring problem over the international break.In positive news for the Blues, Antonio Rudiger could be eased back by Frank Lampard’s after an interrupted start to the season.Reece James, N’Golo Kante and Mateo Kovacic also picked up injuries over the international break. About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


Scorpio Bulkers to Finance 12 Ships with New Loan

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Monaco-based bulker owner Scorpio Bulkers has received a commitment for a loan facility of up to USD 184 million.The loan facility, secured from Nordea AB, acting through its New York branch, and Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken AB, will be used to finance up to 60% of the fair market value of six Ultramax dry bulk vessels and six Kamsarmax dry bulk vessels.The units in question are SBI Athena, SBI Thalia, SBI Zeus, SBI Hera, SBI Poseidon and SBI Apollo, while the Kamsarmaxes include SBI Conga, SBI Bolero, SBI Sousta, SBI Rock, SBI Reggae and SBI Mazurka.Scorpio Bulkers  informed that the loan facility, which is expected to close within the third quarter of 2018, will be comprised of a term loan up to USD 104 million and a revolver up to USD 80 million.The loan facility has a final maturity date of five years from signing date and bears interest at LIBOR plus a margin of 2.40% per annum and is expected to increase the company’s liquidity by around USD 47 million after repayment of the vessels’ existing debt.last_img read more


Rest Wont Help The Cavs — And They Wont Need Any Help

To say the Cleveland Cavaliers and Toronto Raptors have taken different paths to the NBA Eastern Conference Finals would be quite the understatement. The Cavs easily swept their first two series, against the Pistons and Hawks; the Raptors were pushed to seven games in each of theirs, with the Pacers and Heat. Toronto played its last game this past Sunday; Cleveland last played the Sunday before that. As a result, LeBron & Co. have an enormous advantage in the rest department heading into Game 1 at home Tuesday night. But will it help the Cavs much? Don’t bank on it.The Cavs already enter the series as heavy favorites: Our Elo-based forecast gives them a 74 percent chance of prevailing. And the seven-day rest differential over the Raptors is tied for second among the 230 playoff series occurring in the second round or later since 1984, when the league launched the 16-team playoff format. (The largest difference in time off was nine days, in the 2004 Pacers-Heat series.)Such a long layoff for one team and a tight turnaround for the other can spin either way — rest or rust — but there isn’t any statistical evidence that inequalities in rest between series help or harm teams in the playoffs.We looked at this a couple of ways. First, if either rust or exhaustion is going to have an effect, it’s most likely to come in Game 1 of a new series. Using both teams’ pre-series Elo ratings (FiveThirtyEight’s pet method of estimating a team’s strength at a given moment), we can calculate expected point differentials for those opening games and then compare them to the games’ actual scoring margins. Teams that got more days off than their opponent did not do better than expected in these Game 1s, in terms of their expected point margins; any benefit of extra rest wasn’t statistically significant. But that’s just looking at Game 1s. What about the whole series? As a second pass at the question, we used a logistic regression — a nifty statistical tool for examining outcomes such as wins and losses — to test whether the difference in rest days between the two teams had any impact on the series outcome, after accounting for the series’ Elo-based forecast. The series projection had major significance in predicting who went on to win — no surprise there. But the differential between teams in rest days was not a statistically significant factor, just as in our analysis of Game 1s.But smoking out relationships between rest and rust and the outcome of a series overlooks the most important factor: the quality of the teams. A breakdown of the average differential in Elo between the two teams, sorted by difference in the number of days off between series, shows that better teams are more likely to close out their series quickly, and worse teams that do win are more likely to do so in a longer series.For the Cavs-Raptors series, what really matters is not Cleveland’s long vacation nor Toronto’s heavy workload, but the simple fact that the Cavs are the better team. Rest was never going to change that.Check out our NBA playoff predictions. read more


Baseballs New PitchTracking System Is Just A Bit Outside

There’s a good argument to be made that MLB launched the new sports–data revolution in 2006, when it introduced PITCHf/x. The technology used cameras to measure the velocity, position, and break of every pitch in real time, transforming how sabermetricians analyzed the sport. But this season, PITCHf/x was phased out in favor of Statcast, a newer and more advanced system that tracks the ball (and players) using a combination of radar and cameras.On paper, Statcast is an incredible leap forward — and when it works, it’s amazing. But so far, it has struggled to measure the basic elements of pitching that PITCHf/x had down cold, causing confusion among sabermetricians and fans alike.It all started the first weekend of the season, when observers noted some unusual pitch velocity readings from San Francisco Giants hurler Madison Bumgarner. Bumgarner’s fastball was up almost two full miles per hour compared with last year; in a league where every tick matters, that reading could have meant a much better season for the Giants’ ace than expected. It wasn’t just Bumgarner: FanGraphs writer Dave Cameron quickly noticed that velocity numbers had jumped across the league. Days after the changes were noted, MLB data guru Tom Tango clarified in a blog post that the changeover from PITCHf/x to Statcast had altered the way pitch speed was recorded, making it appear that velocity had increased. An MLB Advanced Media spokesperson who requested not to be identified said “the transition saw unexpected issues that have been resolved,” but declined to comment further.And tracking velocity was only the beginning of Statcast’s troubles. Real-time data from MLB’s Gameday app has been inconsistent or obviously erroneous in the season’s first month. Some days, it has gone missing altogether, only to reappear later without explanation. Statcast has always had gaps in its data, but in previous years, that missing information was limited to batted-ball velocity and launch angle. The pitch-tracking issues that cropped up this year are in dramatic contrast with those we saw from PITCHf/x, which tended to miss only a handful of throws a season.Even if you focus solely on the pitches that Statcast successfully tracks, its measurement error is much higher than PITCHf/x’s was. We can tell whether a park is systematically measuring pitches incorrectly by looking at the average vertical and horizontal coordinates of pitches there. If the data from a particular park tends to always be a bit high or a bit outside compared to when the same pitchers throw at other parks, it’s likely that the measurements are off. And according to models I built to measure the systematic error in each ballpark,1I used generalized linear models, with a random effect for the park. the new system is struggling to determine where the ball crosses the plate. Here’s what those errors look like when averaged across the league. Errors in both horizontal and vertical movement have never been higher in the four years that Statcast has made some of its data publicly available.2This year’s horizontal errors are tied with last year’s as the highest ever; this year’s vertical errors are the highest ever. So it’s not just your imagination as you watch the game on TV: In-broadcast representations of the strike zone (like FoxTrax) take their data from Statcast, and Statcast’s errors, in turn, have bred anger with umpires and confusion over how pitches are being called.Statcast runs into the most trouble when it’s quantifying pitch break, or the degree to which pitches move up and down or side to side as they travel between the mound and the plate. Third-party observers have catalogued numerous inaccuracies with Statcast’s break numbers. “It appears that the current Statcast/TrackMan h[orizontal]/v[ertical] break can be up to 3 inches divergent from the truth, simply comparing it to 2016 PITCHf/x data,” said Kyle Boddy, a data-driven trainer with multiple MLB clients. Even the average Statcast-reported break number is about an inch off. Some readings are especially egregious: One pitch was originally reported to have arced upward more than 20 inches on its trip from the mound to the plate. The combination of errors in velocity and break have rendered some pitches impossible to classify, further confusing sabermetricians.Making matters worse, some ballparks show much larger errors than others. So far this season, Atlanta’s brand-new SunTrust Park appears to have the most accurate vertical break numbers, only off by two-tenths of an inch on average. Meanwhile, Cincinnati’s Great American Ball Park shows the worst errors, missing by an average of 2.4 inches per pitch. So not only are the errors bigger than in the days of PITCHf/x, they’re also more inconsistent: Last year, every park’s errors ranged from 0.04 to 1.4 inches.Park-specific calibration errors such as these may explain other aberrant MLB trends. Despite the aforementioned league-wide hike in measured velocity, Chicago Cubs starters have registered lower fastball velocities than last year, sparking concern among Cubs fans. Writers have pointed to poor starts by Chicago pitchers as evidence that the velocity drop-offs are real, and even suggested that it could be part of a conscious effort by Cubs pitchers to decrease fatigue. But the far simpler explanation is bad data: If the club’s pitch tracker is poorly calibrated, it could make it look like pitchers are losing velocity when in fact the readings are just wrong. Supporting this idea is the fact that opposing teams’ pitchers in Wrigley have also registered a lower raw velocity than average. Unless the Cubs’ velocity woes are contagious, it seems likely that Statcast errors are driving some of their low numbers.The root cause of Statcast’s troubles is unknown. The problems could originate in the hardware, the computer code processing the resulting data, or any other part of a complex system. The hardware part of Statcast — the part that actually tracks pitches — is a radar system sold by a company called TrackMan. Boddy’s company, Driveline Baseball, maintains their own TrackMan machine and has previously characterized its performance. “It is well-known in the industry that TrackMan has a lot of calibration issues, especially in nonstandard deployments.” Boddy said. For a radar system that works best in empty environments, it hardly gets less standard than trying to take measurements in a crowded MLB stadium on game day.The good news is that MLB could learn from the last major technological innovation it deployed. When PITCHf/x first came out in the postseason of 2006, there were major issues with its initial calibration. “The data was open sourced and required tons of work from the public sphere to massage and get right,” Boddy said. “It was years before the data stabilized, and MLBAM has public analysts to thank for doing tons of free work.” But in contrast to a decade ago, MLB is now providing very little detail about Statcast’s internal workings. Without greater disclosure from MLB, it’s impossible to know what issues Statcast is having, or when they may be resolved. (At times, their own analysts appear to find out about changes to the public data after the fact.) Until Statcast improves, television viewers and sabermetricians alike will have to take pitch-tracking measurements with a grain of salt. read more


Which Picks Did NFL Mock Drafts Get Most Wrong

Green BayRashan GaryDE1211.2+0.8 PittsburghDevin BushLB1015.5-5.5 WashingtonDwayne HaskinsQB158.8+6.2 TennesseeJeffery SimmonsDT1929.5-10.5 With the first round of the NFL draft complete, it appears that the wisdom of the crowds wasn’t particularly wise. The first three picks went relatively as expected, but the draft went off script with the Oakland Raiders’ pick at No. 4 overall: defensive end Clelin Ferrell of Clemson — a player who mock drafters believed would go somewhere in the middle of the first round. The Raiders’ pick was the first of many that defied expectations and left amateur GMs scratching their heads.In the case of the New York Giants, some fans were banging their heads against the wall and collapsing in tears. New York, which passed on many quarterbacks a year ago to take running back Saquon Barkley, took Duke QB Daniel Jones at No. 6. Jones averaged a 20.4 pick in mock drafts taken in the last 30 days before the draft but came off the board an eyebrow-raising 14.4 picks earlier. The Giants seemed to be trying to get ahead of a quarterback run that didn’t exist: Ohio State’s Dwayne Haskins lasted until Washington took him at No. 15 (6.2 picks later than expected), and no subsequent QBs were taken on Thursday night.But the New York football Giants, armed with three picks in the first round alone, weren’t finished reaching. Using the 17th overall pick they acquired when they dealt Odell Beckham Jr. to the Browns, the Giants selected DT Dexter Lawrence of Clemson, 10.5 picks earlier than expected. The Giants were able to capture some surplus value with their third and final pick of the first round, however: Georgia CB Deandre Baker lasted 3.2 picks longer than expected and should help fill the void in the Giants secondary that was left when Eli Apple was traded to New Orleans last October for picks in the fourth and seventh rounds. Tampa BayDevin WhiteLB57.0-2.0 The NFL draft has been full of surprisesThe first round of the 2019 NFL draft by each player’s pick and his average draft position (ADP) in mock drafts since March 26, 2019 New EnglandN’Keal HarryWR3229.3+2.7 WashingtonMontez SweatDE2610.6+15.4 MiamiChristian WilkinsDT1319.0-6.0 BaltimoreMarquise BrownWR2525.4-0.4 Green BayDarnell SavageS2154.7-33.7 N.Y. GiantsDexter LawrenceDT1727.5-10.5 CincinnatiJonah WilliamsOT1113.3-2.3 The selections of Lawrence and Ferrell were part of a larger trend: NFL GMs appear to have been particularly enamored with Clemson players. Three Tiger defensive standouts from the national championship team were selected in the first round, and they went 10.5 slots earlier on average than mock drafts predicted.A dominant theme of the night, as expected, was NFL teams trying to find the next star pass rusher. But it was a pass rusher who had the biggest slide down the board among the first-round selections. Washington appears to have gotten a substantial value when it selected Mississippi State DE Montez Sweat 26th overall. In a draft class stacked with edge rushing talent, Sweat came off the board 15.4 picks later than expected.1Sweat was diagnosed with a heart condition earlier this year, which may have caused his stock to drop, but it was reported Thursday that the diagnosis could have been wrong.When we look at all 32 first-round picks, the correlation between what mock drafters expected and what actually occurred was about the same in 2019 as it was in 2018. In 2019, the average draft position in mock drafts explained 48 percent of variance, down slightly from 49 percent of variance explained in 2018. This year’s first round skewed toward reaches, with six teams trading up on draft day to get their guys. Overall, players came off the board six picks earlier than expected; last year, that difference was five spots.As a result, Day 2 of the draft should be one in which savvy teams can find more value than they may have initially anticipated. That could even drive more pick swapping, as teams look to swoop in and grab coveted players like mock draft darling D.K. Metcalf on the cheap. PhiladelphiaAndre DillardOT2217.6+4.4 CarolinaBrian BurnsLB1616.0+0.0 Sources: NFL, Ben Robinson HoustonTytus HowardOT2360.7-37.7 San FranciscoNick BosaDE22.1-0.1 OaklandJosh JacobsRB2427.2-3.2 N.Y. JetsQuinnen WilliamsDT33.7-0.7 DenverNoah FantTE2022.9-2.9 DetroitTJ HockensonTE813.0-5.0 AtlantaKaleb McGaryOT3143.3-12.3 teamplayerPositionpickADPdiff JacksonvilleJosh AllenLB73.7+3.3 BuffaloEd OliverDT99.3-0.3 L.A. ChargersJerry TilleryDT2831.6-3.6 MinnesotaGarrett BradburyC1825.7-7.7 N.Y. GiantsDaniel JonesQB620.4-14.4 SeattleL.J. CollierDE2962.9-33.9 OaklandJohnathan AbramS2733.6-6.6 OaklandClelin FerrellDE419.0-15.0 N.Y. GiantsDeandre BakerCB3026.8+3.2 AtlantaChris LindstromG1429.3-15.3 ArizonaKyler MurrayQB11.8-0.8 From ABC News: read more


Columbus Clippers ball boy has a Storey to share

Matt Storey is many things. He is a 22-year-old sports fanatic who can talk for hours about his favorite teams, players and even mascots. He is a ball boy at Huntington Park for the Columbus Clippers. He works at Riverside Methodist Hospital in patient transportation and environmental services. He is also developmentally disabled, which normally would keep someone from doing half the activities he does. Matt, who has trouble speaking, communicated through his parents. “He started in sixth grade being the manager for the eighth-grade basketball team,” said Ken Storey, his father. Matt participated in the Special Olympics growing up, but decided he enjoyed managing more. While at Dublin Coffman High School, he managed the football, wrestling and baseball teams. He loved going to the games and feeling like he was part of each team, even though he didn’t get to be on the field. Matt’s parents even bought him a Dublin Coffman helmet, which he wore on the sidelines with his No. 99 jersey. His hard work and personality did not go unnoticed, and his classmates voted him homecoming king in 2008. “Matt has the ability to adapt to those around him,” said Kim Storey, his mother. Matt was also able to hold jobs off the field in the school store and at Longhorn Steakhouse. “The amazing thing was that, at Longhorn, he learned the table numbers by associating them with professional athletes,” Kim said. It was during a trip to Huntington Park in 2009 that Kim felt she had found the perfect fit for Matt. “It is very hard to find employment for special needs. Everywhere I go, I wonder if it is a good place for Matt to work,” she said. “But when I was down at Huntington, I just got this feeling.” Matt’s parents put together a portfolio and sent it to George Robinson, the clubhouse manager. After looking at it and making a few phone calls, Robinson decided to give Matt a job. “He has a passion and a love for the game like I do,” Robinson said. “After we talked, we had a little special bond.” Robinson always keeps an eye on Matt by staying on the steps of the dugout or notifying the umpires about him. Matt learned quickly and did his job well. The players immediately took notice, and developed a fondness for his hard work. “All the players joke around with him,” Robinson said. “Matt is part of our family here.” When the Clippers were en route to their Governors Cup victory last year, they asked Matt to come to the ballpark and work during the playoffs. When the 2011 season was about to begin, Robinson sent the Storeys an email talking about how much the team wanted Matt back. The Storeys could not wait for Matt to don his uniform again this year. “We sit in the stands and just enjoy it,” Ken said. The journey from sixth-grade manager to working at Huntington Park has been as exciting for Matt as it has been for his parents. “The Clippers have been wonderful through all this,” Ken said. “To take a chance on a boy like Matt just speaks volumes about them.” read more


Ohio States Chris Fields finds moment when Buckeyes need him late in

Chris Fields hadn’t caught a ball all year long. Not a single one. In an Ohio State offense averaging 39 points a game, the redshirt junior wide receiver found himself reception-less and yard-less two-thirds into the Buckeyes’ 2012 campaign. Cast in the shadow of younger receivers like sophomore Devin Smith and junior Corey “Philly” Brown, Fields, for all intents and purposes, had been a non-factor for an undefeated OSU team. Until Saturday’s 29-22 overtime win against Purdue, at least. And after making the biggest catch of his OSU football career, Fields said he’s used to throwing himself after the ball. “I don’t know if anybody knows but 13 years of baseball paid off for that one. I used to be a center fielder,” Fields said with a wide smile. “I used to dive all over the place, so I’m used to it.” Down 22-14 with 47 seconds to play, though, that opportunity appeared to be doubtful while the first loss of the Urban Meyer era in Columbus seemed like a sure thing. After all, a typically explosive Buckeyes offense had managed to scrap together just two touchdowns points over the course of 59 minutes and 13 seconds. Without sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller, who was carted off the field and taken to the Wexner Medical Center at the end of the third quarter, it appeared it would take a small miracle for OSU to eke out a victory against Purdue on the cloudy afternoon at Ohio Stadium. In the Heisman candidate’s place was the man Fields calls his best friend, redshirt junior quarterback Kenny Guiton, who had already thrown an errant interception earlier in the fourth quarter. Sportswriters were writing obituaries for the Buckeyes’ would-have-been perfect season. Hordes of frustrated, exasperated fans headed toward the exits after watching more than 59 minutes of incompetency from the home team. For as shaky as OSU’s offense appeared, though, Fields’ play seemed to be just the opposite. Coming into the contest against the Boilermakers, he had just 11 career-receptions to hang his hat on. Including Saturday’s tilt, the Painesville, Ohio, native had only seen action in five games for the Buckeyes this season. With eight seconds to play, Fields’ moment, as he called it, came. Guiton had improbably driven a once-lifeless OSU offense down to the 2-yard line. “Kenny! Kenny!” chants reverberated off the cement stands of the 90-year-old Horseshoe. The backup signal-caller rolled to his left and saw an open Fields matching his every step along the edge of the goal line – just the way it was drawn up. “I had the like an arrow route, it’s kinda like a flat route and Kenny noticed man coverage,” he said. Eight seconds had become four as Guiton zipped the ball to Fields. Its trajectory, while likely not intended, hurled it toward the red turf of the end zone. In a diving effort, though, Fields pulled the pass into his gut and hugged the ball to the ground. While the catch was immediately reviewed, Fields said there was never a doubt in his mind that he hadn’t made the grab. “Yeah, I knew I caught it. I had it. No question,” he said. Guiton, who Fields called his “brother from another mother,” said he felt the same. “After that catch, I probably told him ‘thank you’ a million times. On the pass, I was just hoping he could get it, and when I saw his hands under it, I knew he caught it,” Guiton said. Having not pulled in a reception all season, what could be a historic grab was Fields’ third and final catch as the junior managed to pull in two earlier receptions to help push the Buckeyes into the red zone early in the third quarter. Arguably, it was Fields’ best day since arriving on campus in 2009. “Chris Fields is a product of, I’d like to say, our program,” Meyer said during the Buckeyes’ postgame press conference. “That means three weeks ago, he wouldn’t have been on the field.” Not anymore, though. “He just changed his whole dynamics, the way he works, his practice habits and his performance,” Meyer said. “You can go out there and work all you want and not make plays. But he’s earned that right to be on the field. He was even playing before that, before Philly (Brown) went down, he was on the field, where three, four weeks ago he wasn’t on the field. “It’s just that whole systematic approach that we have … very proud of him.” The spring rumors that flooded message boards that Fields was leaving the team, now, seemed to be a foreign, distant memory. Even it just was for one day. “The first couple games (leaving) did go through my mind,” Fields said. “Not so much of leaving, just so much of like my future, like after football. You know, I would never leave this university. I mean, this university, it’s so great. And I’d be dumb to leave this wonderful university. So, I mean, I just was thinking about some plans after football and stuff.” For now, though, Fields might need to think more about the immediate future with a 5:30 p.m. contest at Penn State looming Saturday. The catch, perhaps, could be the first of more to come from the receiver. “It just means that you should start putting a package in for me and Kenny,” Fields said teasingly. “I just know that I just can’t, you know, fall down. I gotta keep on going up.” read more