GFF took the correct action with Commission of Inquiry

first_imgFruta Conquerors Secretary, Daniel Thomas sat down with Stabroek Sport for an exclusive interview, in which he discussed the current issue of inappropriate conduct being alleged against several members of the Guyana Football Federation (GFF) secretariat. 1. Given the recent scandals involving high ranking members of the Football Fraternity for inappropriate behavior. What are your thoughts on these issues?“Well, personally for me I think that there should be a zero tolerance towards that type of behaviour whether it be towards females, or children in our society, and especially in clubs, and associations where those forms of behaviour should never ever be condoned.”“I have not been fully briefed on those issues surrounding that at the GFF, however from what has been said by way of the press I do think that the Guyana Football Federation did take the correct action by holding the Commission of Inquiry.  With that being done the corrective steps would be taken, and hopefully recommendations and guidelines on how to handle such issues in the future. So let’s await the outcome of the Inquiry before we attempt to cast guilt upon any one.” 2. How should the GFF deal with these matters given the nature of the allegations? Do the allegations if proven accurate, warrant a ban from the sport for the individuals involved?“I am quite sure that at the end of the Inquiry, the necessary corrective action would be taken by the executive committee of the GFF.  Those persons who comprise the Commission are Women whom I have the greatest respect for, and I am sure that they shall be fair and impartial in both their findings and recommendations.”“Credit should be given to the GFF for at least having the Commission of Inquiry, the easiest route could have been to have the Exco make a decision on the issue, but in all fairness to everyone this is the correct course of action. In the broader scheme of Guyana’s football it does provide us with an opportunity to get such issues and allegations handled correctly and professionally.” 3. How badly has the image of the GFF been tarnished by these episodes given that the individuals accused are high ranking officials of the Secretariat?“These things do happen, it wouldn’t be the first or it shall not be the last. We have seen the recent allegations being leveled against a prominent high school teacher, so in all situations the process must be one that is fair and just and gives all sides to be heard, and then a decision made, whether it is through the Courts system or a Commission of Inquiry. The important aspect is that persons must have confidence in the system, and be patient on the outcome.”4. Several weeks prior the club staged important workshop tackling sexual protection and overall conduct of coaches towards children. How important was the launching of that forum in hindsight given the recent scandals plaguing the local fraternity? “From our club’s perspective I am very happy that I was able to have the foresight and the vision to launch such a programme. For far too long the issues surrounding the allegations of perverted and predatory behaviour being done to players has often times gone under the radar.  To me no one has had the fortitude to deal with the issues, but in the developed world and those advanced societies such behaviours are never permitted because there are requisite systems, and protocols in place to deal with such allegations.”5. Did the GFF assist in any way to aid in the staging of the workshop? Also, has the federation contacted you on possibly staging other forms of a similar nature following its conclusion?“No the GFF never did assist, I am not sure that they were aware of our workshop. This workshop was the concept of the club. We have the largest pool of junior players in Guyana both male and female, and the time was right for us to put the necessary mechanisms in place to protect these children and at the same time educate all the coaches and the team managers. No I have not been contacted by the GFF to assist on anything of a similar nature, maybe they have their own ideas that they are working on to soon implement.”last_img read more


Newseum hailed free press, but got beaten by free museums

first_imgWASHINGTON | In 2008, the Newseum — a private museum dedicated to exploring modern history as told through the eyes of journalists — opened on prime Washington real estate.Sitting almost equidistant between the White House and the Capitol on Pennsylvania Avenue, the glass-walled building became instantly recognizable for its multi-story exterior rendition of the First Amendment.Eleven years later that experiment is coming to an end. After years of financial difficulties, the Newseum will close its doors Tuesday.“We’re proud of how we did our storytelling,” said Sonya Gavankar, the outgoing director of public relations. “We changed the model of how museums did their work.”The building was sold for $372.5 million to Johns Hopkins University, which intends to consolidate its scattered Washington-based graduate studies programs under one roof.Gavankar attributed the failure to a “mosaic of factors” but one of them was certainly unfortunate timing. The opening coincided with the 2008 economic recession, which hit newspapers particularly hard and caused mass layoffs and closures across the industry.She also acknowledged that the Newseum’s status as a for-pay private institution was a harder sell in a city full of free museums. A Newseum ticket costs $25 for adults, and the building is right across the street from the National Gallery of Art and within blocks of multiple Smithsonian museums.“Competing with free institutions in Washington was difficult,” Gavankar said.Another problem, organizers said, is that the Newseum struggled to attract local residents, instead depending on a steady diet of tourists and local school groups. Actual Washington-area residents, who do frequent the Smithsonian and elsewhere, mostly came on school trips and rarely returned as adults.Claire Myers fits that profile. The D.C. resident recalls coming to the Newseum in high school in a senior-year class trip. She only returned in late December for a final visit because she heard it was closing at the end of the year.“I do think part of the reason was because it’s a paid museum,” she said. “Why go out of my way to do this when I could just go to any other free museum?”The $25 price tag, Myers said, creates a pressure to set aside the whole day and take in every exhibit, whereas at one of the free Smithsonian museums, she knows she can come back another time to catch whatever she missed. But Myers said she was deeply impressed by the exhibits, particularly the Newseum’s signature gallery of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs.“I do wish it wasn’t going away,” she said.The museum’s focus evolved over the years, showcasing not just journalism and historic events, but all manner of free speech and civil rights issues and some whimsical quirks along the edges. Exhibits during the Newseum’s final days included an exploration of the cultural and political influence of Jon Stewart and “The Daily Show,” a look at the history of the struggle for LGBTQ rights and a display depicting the history of presidential dogs.Gavankar said the Freedom Forum, which originally maintained the Newseum in northern Virginia for years, would continue its mission in different forms. The educational foundation maintains a pair of exhibits on the Berlin Wall in both Reagan and Dulles airports. Next year, those displays will be replaced by exhibits on the women’s suffrage movement. The current Rise Up! exhibit on LGBTQ rights will move to a new long-term home in the Museum of Pop Culture in Seattle. In this Friday, Dec. 20, 2019, photo, the Newseum is seen in Washington. The Newseum will close the Pennsylvania Avenue location on Dec. 31, 2019. It attracted millions of visitors but lacked a solid financial plan to stay afloat. The mission of the Newseum is to increase public understanding of the importance of a free press and the First Amendment. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) 1 of 3 FILE – In this Friday, Dec. 20, 2019, photo, people visit the Pulitzer Prize Photography exhibition at the Newseum, in Washington. The Newseum will close the Pennsylvania Avenue location on Dec. 31, 2019. It attracted millions of visitors but lacked a solid financial plan to stay afloat. The mission of the Newseum is to increase public understanding of the importance of a free press and the First Amendment. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) In this Friday, Dec. 20, 2019, photo, people visit the Newseum, in Washington. The Newseum will close the Pennsylvania Avenue location on Dec. 31, 2019. It attracted millions of visitors but lacked a solid financial plan to stay afloat. The mission of the Newseum is to increase public understanding of the importance of a free press and the First Amendment. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)last_img read more