Caleb Ewan sprints to victory once again on stage 11 of Giro d’Italia

first_imgCaleb Ewan picked up his second stage win of the 2019 Giro d’Italia as the Australian took the honours on what could be the last bunch finish of this year’s race.The Australian won stage 11 for Lotto-Soudal in a drag race of a sprint in Novi Ligure, the hometown of the Italian great Fausto Coppi.Tuesday’s winner Arnaud Demare of Groupama-FDJ came home second to take the lead in the points classification ahead of Bora-Hansgrohe’s Pascal Ackermann, who had to settle for third on the day. Ewan had jumped on to Ackermann’s wheel on the final approach and bided his time before launching again. Support The Guardian Cycling Giro d’Italia Was this helpful? Since you’re here… … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Twitter: follow us at @guardian_sportFacebook: like our football and sport pagesInstagram: our favourite photos, films and storiesYouTube: subscribe to our football and sport channels Quick guide Follow Guardian sport on social media Share on Facebook Thank you for your feedback. Share on Pinterest Share on Messenger news Hide Photograph: Chesnot/Getty Images Europe Share on Twitter Show “[Ackermann] is one of the quickest here and he was the first sprinter that came past me,” the Lotto-Soudal rider said. “My guys got me in a good position and it made my run a whole lot easier. I could just sit there and then time my sprint to perfection.“My team have done a great job all week and I’m a little bit more relaxed going into the stage with one win already. When you’re more relaxed you save more energy and everything seems to fall into place more easily.”But there was more frustration for the Italian champion Elia Viviani, who could only manage fourth place as he was caught out of position. The Deceunick-QuickStep rider now looks set to leave the race with three second-placed finishes to his name as he turns his attention to the Tour de France.The sprint finish meant no change to the general classification, with UAE Team Emirates’ Valerio Conti keeping the pink jersey with an advantage of 1min 50sec over the race favourite Primoz Roglic of Team Jumbo-Visma. Mitchelton-Scott’s Simon Yates remains in 13th place, more than five-and-a-half minutes off Conti’s time.It was a sprint which almost appeared to play out in slow motion as they rode into a headwind down the long final straight at the end of a 221km stage from Carpi which had hardly been raced at a rapid rate. Three riders – Marco Frapporti (Androni-Giocattoli-Sidermec), Mirco Maestri (Bardiana-CSF) and Damiano Cima (Nippo-Vini Fantini-Faizane) – had been allowed to go clear, building a lead of around six minutes on the old Roman road of Via Aemilia. Arnaud Démare wins stage 10 of Giro after Ackermann crash sparks chaos Topics Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Read more Share on WhatsApp But with the sprint teams massing on the front, aware this was their final chance, they were finally reeled in with 26km to go as a cagey battle for position began.Ackermann had launched his sprint first but though he faded he can be happy with third place given the injuries he sustained in a late crash on Tuesday. All the same, he must now hand over the points leader’s ciclamino jersey to Demare, with the Frenchman moving 11 ahead in the standings.Yates and others with time to make up will now look to Thursday’s stage as the more mountainous tests begin with a 158km stage from Cueno to Pinerolo, highlighted by the late ascent of Montoso, a category one test.Those sprinters with an interest in the points classification may well be the only ones to take the start given the climbing to come as there are few other rewards open to them between here and Verona, and many of them have eyes on the Tour de France in July. Reuse this contentlast_img read more


a month agoTottenham midfielder Moussa Sissoko: Leicester defeat painful

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Tottenham midfielder Moussa Sissoko: Leicester defeat painfulby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham midfielder Moussa Sissoko admits defeat to Leicester City was a blow.Sissoko has urged Tottenham to accept and move on quickly from their “painful” 2-1 defeat to Leicester.”There is a lot of frustration, but we need to accept it, even if it is painful because we have another game on Tuesday,” Sissoko said to Spurs TV.”Even if it is a cup game, we have to be focused on that game (now).”We need to work hard and analyse what went wrong (at Leicester) and move on.”We don’t have time to think too much because we have to recover as soon as possible and be ready for Tuesday if we want to have a good game and win.”There is a lot of frustration, but we need to move on.” last_img read more


Lyon set records in PSG win

first_imgLyon continued their impressive run over Paris Saint-Germain as they ended the Ligue 1 leaders’ 21-match unbeaten run at the Groupama Stadium.Moussa Dembele’s header and a penalty from Nabil Fekir secured victory over Bruno Genesio’s side after Angel di Maria had given the defending champions an early lead.PSG are 10 points clear of Lille at the top and have seen their hopes of going the whole campaign without losing dashed. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Meanwhile, Lyon have a six-point cushion over fourth place Saint-Etienne in the race for the final Champions League spot.2015 – Paris have lost a Ligue 1 game after scoring the opening goal for the 1st time since January 2015 against Bastia (2-4). Shake. pic.twitter.com/5MqVYGL4UX— OptaJean (@OptaJean) February 3, 2019Argentina international Di Maria opened the scoring after seven minutes, playing a role in a goal for the fourth time in as many games.But the French champions would go on to lose their first Ligue 1 game after scoring first since January 2015, when they were downed 4-2 by Bastia.4 – Lyon have beaten Paris in Ligue 1 more often than any other team since the Qatari era began in August 2011 (4 times). Kryptonite. @OL_English pic.twitter.com/vaTeGVEs0f— OptaJean (@OptaJean) February 3, 2019Leo Dubois teed up Dembele for the equaliser, as the ex-Celtic forward beat Alphonse Areola to the ball to nod into an empty net.Dembele would turn provider after being fouled by Thiago Silva to win a penalty after the break.Fekir sent Areola the wrong way from the spot to thrust Lyon ahead.3 – Aucun joueur n’est impliqué sur plus de buts que Nabil Fekir face à Paris en Ligue 1 depuis le début de la saison dernière (3 – 2 buts, 1 assist). Leader. @OL pic.twitter.com/rB9GsOSkhj— OptaJean (@OptaJean) February 3, 2019No player has contributed to more goals against PSG since the start of the 2017-18 campaign than the France international, who now has two goals and an assist during that period against Thomas Tuchel’s men,The victory was the fourth time Lyon have beaten their rivals since Qatar Sports Investments took over the club in August 2011.Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and his assistant Mike Phelan watched the defeat less than two weeks before Manchester United’s Champions League last-16 first leg clash with the Paris club.last_img read more


MHI Oshima Reach Deal on Shipbuilding Alliance

first_imgzoom Japanese shipbuilder Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has reached a basic agreement with its compatriot Oshima Shipbuilding as part of efforts to form an alliance in the commercial ship business.The deal aims at establishing a technical alliance to focus on development of new ship designs and technologies, standardization of design and construction, and efficient shared use of tools and equipment.The alliance follows on from a previous agreement reached at the end of March with Imabari Shipbuilding and Namura Shipbuilding. Contracts for specific projects will be decided on an individual basis.In late August 2016, MHI unveiled plans to launch discussions toward forming alliances with three compatriot shipbuilders – Imabari Shipbuilding, Oshima Shipbuilding and Namura Shipbuilding.The agreements are said to be targeted at achieving sustained growth “through the pursuit of mutually complementary, synergy-generating alliances while respecting each partner’s independence, in an overall effort to strengthen the competitiveness of all alliance partners in the global marketplace.”last_img read more


American hypocrisy

first_imgThe International Religious Freedom Report which describes the status of religious freedom in every country was published by the United States creating a global furore. In essence, the report covers government policies violating religious belief and practices of groups, religious denominations and individuals, and US policies to promote religious freedom around the world. Naturally, it is critical of countries’ performance in providing religious freedom with the US accusing several countries including North Korea, Iran, Russia, Myanmar, China as well as India of gross violations against minority communities. Corroborating reports through multiple sources to increase comprehensiveness and reduce the potential for bias, it cites government and societal action that typifies and illuminates issues reported in each country. While the US regards China as a ‘Country of Particular Concern’ on religious freedom, referring to the mass detainment of more than one million Chinese Muslims (Uighurs) in Xinjiang province, it maintains Iran on the list (since 1999) regarding the regime’s crackdown on Baha’is, Christians, and others. Not sparing India for the reported outrage over mob-lynching and inflammatory speeches being made by senior officials of BJP – country’s ruling party – preceding the general elections, the report cited several irregularities in religious freedom that the US has highlighted vis a vis India. Even the mention of how “the Central and state governments and members of political parties took steps that affected Muslim practices and institutions” and how “proposals to rename Indian cities with Muslim provenance continued, most notably the renaming of Allahabad to Prayagraj”. In an expected response, and opposing the US’s stance of ‘reducing bias’ in regard to the report, BJP strongly reacted to the report citing outright bias against the current Modi-led dispensation as well as BJP. MEA’s response rejecting the report that criticised the status of minorities in India and asserting that “we see no locus standi for a foreign entity to pronounce on the state of our citizens’ constitutionally protected rights” is highly welcoming. The United States has no business commenting on other countries’ religious paradigms with regard to the rights protected under the sovereign States’ Constitution. MEA through spokesperson Raveesh Kumar elaborated on how India is a vibrant democracy where the fundamental rights of all its citizens including minorities are protected under the Constitution. That in itself signifies how we remain in absolutely no need of a critique such as the US to remind us of the disparities or sporadic inconsistencies that have been highlighted in the Western Media with regards to internal affairs. While instances cited in the report might not be false reports, it remains in the interest of the Indian government to cater to any instability that amounts to a violation of the constitutionally-backed rights. Any interference by the US, even in the form of a report that highlights internal affairs, is heavily unappreciated. The United States, no matter the liberty it exercises in terms of unilateralism, has no say in matters pertaining to India’s secular structure and its elements. Reports which draw performance sketch over crucial indicators of a country in contemporary times are usually expected off neutral organisations of global repute such as UN. Through its International Religious Freedom Report, US has tried to play the parent role emulating UN by outrightly highlighting religious inconsistencies in nations – more popularly those it has a direct interaction with irrespective of the nature of the interaction. This explains the bleak picture of communal freedom that it has drawn through its report in countries like Iran and China and even Pakistan. Ahead of Pompeo’s state visit today, the report has brought minor tension in the air by being unappreciative on the Indian side. Also Read – A compounding difficultyLooking forward to strengthening strategic ties with India while hurting its sovereign sentiment through such reports is probably not the best way to start the visit. Increasing tension over trade, data flows and arms from Russia have already muddied the water for Indo-US discussion; the report aggravating the situation, to say the least. Pompeo’s focus on laying a perfect path for Trump and Modi’s interaction at the G20 summit later in the week in Japan might be slightly hindered due to the latest theatrics the US pulled with the report. Pompeo’s “Modi hai toh mumkin hai” jibe while stressing at possibilities between the two countries in strategic partnership develops an empty-rhetoric with Pompeo himself releasing the report. Though the report does not particularly antagonise India, it is the US’s unilateralism that hurts. Being a developed nation does not provide an incentive to comment on else’s internal affairs to this extent and especially when the report does not cover their own gaps. The report particularly cites selective Muslim persecution in India but the US, out of all nations, does not get to hold the mic – global perception acknowledges the kind of religious freedom that was cherished by Muslims in the US when they were illegally detained over the rampant and desperate US-drive of selectively persecuting Muslims in the wake of 9/11 which stretched over years.last_img read more


An explainer on the Ontario governments move to review highway speed limits

first_imgAdam Burns, The Canadian Press TORONTO — Ontario’s government plans to launch a review of speed limits on provincial highways, with the transportation minister musing that some of those roads can safely handle traffic at 120 kilometres per hour. Here’s a look at the context around the issue:HOW ARE SPEED LIMITS DETERMINED?According to Mohamed Hussein, a transportation engineering professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, there are effectively three speed limits for any highway: the “design” speed, which is the maximum speed at which a road can be safely navigated and determines every element of its design; the “operating” speed, which is how fast traffic actually moves on the road; and the “posted” speed, which is displayed on roadside signs. The posted speed is a product of many factors, including a commonly used measure called the 85th percentile: the speed at which 85 per cent of traffic will travel at or below. Political considerations are also a factor, such as when the United States passed a national speed limit law in the early 1970s. The legislation was enacted in an effort to conserve fuel amid an embargo on oil shipments from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).WHAT ARE THE EXISTING LIMITS IN ONTARIO?The speed limit on the 400-series highways, including Highway 401 — part of which is considered the busiest highway in North America — is 100 km/h, while other provincial highways range between 80 and 90 km/h. According to Bob Nichols, a spokesman for the Ontario Ministry of Transportation, the original limit on highways 400, 401, 417 and the Queen Elizabeth Way was 70 miles per hour (113 km/h), but that was lowered in 1975 in response to the oil crisis. The fact that it hasn’t been raised again in the more than 40 years since then — despite the end of the oil embargo and improvements to vehicle safety and fuel efficiency —has led to calls for change. Chris Klimek, who founded the advocacy campaign Stop 100 eight years ago, said the current limit turns almost every driver in Ontario into a law-breaker. Provincial Transportation Minister Jeff Yurek acknowledged last week that the 400-series highways are designed to handle traffic at 120 km/h, while signalling the province would announce details this week of “a couple of pilot projects at different speed limits.”HAS THIS BEEN TRIED IN CANADA?Yes — In 2014, British Columbia adjusted speed limits on 33 sections of highway following a months-long public consultation that showed widespread support for increasing limits. That included increases to 120 km/h — the highest permitted speeds in the country — on certain sections of divided, multi-lane highways. However, the province has since rolled back many of those increases after research showed what B.C. Transportation Minister Claire Trevena called an “alarming” increase in serious collisions on some routes. Hussein characterized the B.C. experiment as a “disaster” and said it would be a “very bad idea” for Ontario to follow suit. “Most research shows that if you are involved within a collision and you are driving more than 120 km/h, your chances to survive are almost zero,” he said. However, another expert — Baher Abdulhai from the University of Toronto’s Transportation Research Institute — counters that 120 km/h is already the “de facto speed limit” on highways in the Greater Toronto Area.HOW DO THE RULES DIFFER IN OTHER JURISDICTIONS?Across Canada, maximum posted speed limits vary by province, from 90 km/h in Prince Edward Island to 110 km/h in B.C., Nova Scotia and elsewhere. Limits tend to be higher in the U.S., where the national speed limit law was repealed in 1995: Hawaii has the lowest limits in the country at 60 mph (97 km/h), while Texas has the highest at 85 mph (137 km/h), according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. In Europe, the most common speed limits are 120 and 130 km/h, and certain sections of the German autobahn system have no maximum, although an “advisory” speed of 130 km/h is posted. Klimek and Abdulhai both point to this as evidence that higher speed limits can work, but Hussein notes there are important design differences that distinguish the autobahn from North American highways, including less frequent interchanges. “It’s a totally different story. We cannot have this system here,” he said.WHAT WOULD NEED TO HAPPEN FOR THIS TO WORK?It’s not yet clear where or how the government will implement its pilot projects, but Abdulhai said technology can play an important role in ensuring it’s done safely. The U of T professor, who specializes in Intelligent Transportation Systems, would like to see “dynamic” speed limits implemented on major highways, adapting the posted limit based on factors such as weather and traffic. In areas where that isn’t possible due to cost, Abdulhai recommends using the 85th percentile rule, which he estimates would lead to a limit of 120 km/h on most GTA highways. Beyond that, he recommends strict enforcement, aided by technology such as radar, along with stronger intervention in what he calls “vulnerable areas” such as school and construction zones.last_img read more


FATCA Morocco Joins Others in a Fiscal Agreement with the United

By Alexandra GrittaRabat – On February 21st, the Minister of Communications and Spokesman of the Government, Mustapha El-Khalfi, announced Morocco’s decision to sign on to the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).FATCA was first introduced under Obama in 2014, with a goal of preventing United States citizens from evading taxes on assets held outside of the States. In recent years, the U.S. has experienced a large gap between its projected and actual tax revenues. The U.S. Government has speculated that citizens with large investments abroad as well as “green card” holders are avoiding fully paying taxes by falsely reporting their assets. FATCA was proposed to “fix” this. In short, FATCA is a request to other Foreign Financial Institutions (FFI) to annually report information to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) about bank accounts held abroad by U.S. citizens. What motivation do countries like Morocco have to agree to FATCA? Naturally, it seems unlikely that other countries would take a special interest in helping the States to catch its non-compliant taxpayers. By identifying its tax-evading citizens, the U.S. would be able to increase its own revenues. But for other countries, FATCA would only involve more “paperwork” with no compensation. Due to a low initial participation rate in FATCA, the U.S. Government decided to modify its policy in order to motivate others to sign onto FATCA. The spokesman of the American Treasury stated to L ’Agence France Presse that, “Generally, the foreign financial institutions that have not signed with the United States have to register [individually] with American tax services […] or otherwise be subject to a 30% tax levy on payments they receive from the United States.”Therefore, unless an FFI is explicitly exempt, 30% of all U.S.-sourced income will be withheld if it opts to not participate. Since payments from the States are a huge source of income for many global banks, over 100 countries have now decided to adopt FATCA to avoid losses.While FATCA was originally introduced to FFIs to be signed, it was later changed to be more of an agreement between entire countries and the U.S. Government. Local banks are often prohibited from reporting information to non-local authorities, so Inter-Government Agreements (IGA) were introduced, allowing FATCA to be passed and enforced as local law. This meant that many local banks were forced into FATCA without reaching individual agreements.Controversy Surrounding FATCA Morocco has now signed on to FATCA after years of “radio silence.” Other countries similarly withheld from agreeing to FATCA’s terms,—and not just because of the extra work involved.A statement made by an American-Swiss man sheds some light on some of the unfairness in the system. In an interview with Swiff Info, he claims, “I was born in the United States, but I have never even lived there. I now have two layers—one in Switzerland, and one in the States,—as well an accounting firm that is helping me with my financial issues. My Swiss bank told me directly that they wanted to be more strict with their American clients, and that I had to sell all of my shares at once. So I sold every share that I owned, and transferred all of my money to the Valiant Bank AG [of Switzerland] where I held my other accounts. One year later, I received a letter from the bank telling me that I had to sign a contract that would force me to pay penalties if it was challenged by the IRS for any problems with my accounts.”Even those who do not identify as “American” are unjustly affected by FATCA simply because they happened to be born on U.S. soil. Those who are not ethnically American and do not live in the States have nothing to do with the United States economy. Forcing them to contribute to it from abroad has sparked an immense amount of controversy, and has left the impression that the U.S. is getting too extreme and greedy with its taxation laws. It also brings into question who should truly qualify as a U.S. “citizen,” as people are being exploited for financial gain. read more


England Womens football is growing

first_imgAccording to Tim Ream, Fulham’s female football ambassador, the sport will continue getting better for women ahead of the Australia meetingEngland Women’s football squad will play against Australia at Craven Cottage on October 9th.And for Fulham footballer, Tim Ream appointed the team’s female football ambassador, the sport will continue growing in England.“From the time that I’ve been in England since 2012, the women’s game has grown hugely – there weren’t that many games being televised but now it’s so different,” he said according to the team’s official website.“You look at the FA WSL and the national team and everything they’ve done up to now, it’s impressive and it’s definitely still improving.”Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“Qualifying for the World Cup is the biggest thing and they’ve been able to do that with a very impressive manager in Phil Neville, who obviously did really well in his club career,” he added.“That translates to the women’s team and they are progressing well, they’ve made it to the World Cup, which was the big battle and now they’re seeing where they can go from there.”“Phil and I never crossed over in our playing careers but he’s a big name in the game, he’s had a really good playing career and that natural next step is to try the coaching side,” he continued.“He’s done a really good job solidifying his position and getting the women to play a certain way, but everything is a process and that’s one that he’s going through currently.”“There’s now a better and stronger pathway for which players can aspire to be on and that can only help grow the game, improve the quality and produce a better project – Phil is helping in that,” he concluded.last_img read more


Teen accused of vandalizing burglarizing Miami vape shop

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – A teen is facing charges following the burglary of a Miami vape shop.The 15-year-old is allegedly part of a trio caught on camera breaking into the Vaporize Me Smoke and Tobacco store, near Southwest Eighth Street and Seventh Avenue.Related: Burglars hit Miami vape shop twice in 2 daysThe surveillance video footage showed the group disguised in Halloween masks on Oct. 3, smashing their way inside the business with hammers.The subjects managed to take off with thousands of dollars worth of merchandise.Investigators are now working to locate the remaining two burglars.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more


Former Norland Senior High assistant principal denied bond in murder of employee

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – The former school administrator accused in the murder of the Miami Gardens woman who, authorities said, worked at the same school and was a lifelong friend appeared in bond court.Ernest Roberts, a former assistant principal at Norland Senior High School, was denied bond on Saturday after being charged with one count of premeditated murder.The suspect was charged on Friday for the murder of test proctor Kameela Russell.Her body was found in a Miami Gardens canal about a mile away from Roberts’ home.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more


GHMC plans to bolster selfhelp groups in city

first_imgHyderabad: The Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation (GHMC) Commissioner M Dana Kishore on Tuesday said GHMC would strengthen the self-help groups (SHGs) financially.Addressing a meeting with the SHG members in city, he said GHMC would purchase lots of vehicles every year and this year they would procure new vehicles through SHGs and get them on the lease, which would help them become financially strong. Also Read – Hyderabad: Intermediate student dies of cardiac arrest in class Advertise With Us The Commissioner said there around 4.5 lakh women enrolled with 45,000 SHGs as members. GHMC would provide the Rs 25 lakh loan to each group towards purchase of trucks, mini lorries etc., he said. 200 more basti dawakhanas soonTo help the poor, the Commissioner said they would open 200 more basti dawakhanas in city within three months. “Now there as many as 105 basti dawakhanas operating in the city limits and we have set up women health associations to monitor the implementation of the health programmes in city, which are launched by the government,” he said. “Last year we provided Rs 376 crore bank loans to the self-help groups in city limits and GHMC would be taking all the measures to provide some more Rs 600 crore loans this year,” he added. Additional Commissioner Sikta Patnaiak, Secunderabad zonal commissioner Raghuvar and others were present at the meeting.last_img read more


BSE closes points 004 up on Jan 31

first_imgNew Delhi, Jan 31 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 0.04 points up to stand at 20498.29. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 13.20 points up to stand at 6086.90. Motherson Sumi and Suzlon Energy were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 12.28% and 9.92% along with CESC Ltd. and Indian Overseas Bank with an increase of 8.84% and 8.62% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include Essar Oil and National Alumini with a decrease of 8.38% and 5.68% along with Pipavav Defence & Offshore Engineering Company Ltd. and Jet Airways India with a decrease of 4.94% and 4.45% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 36.44 points at 11,582.79 while the banking sector is up 95.07 points at 11,713.75 and the realty sector is up 18.61 points at 1,210.80. The Indian currency is down 0.08% at Rs 62.64 per dollar.last_img read more


Ceasefire reached between Israel Hamas

first_imgThe brother of a Palestinian teenager who was killed in an Israeli air strike, reacts in Gaza City on 14 July 2018. Photo: ReutersIsrael unleashed its biggest air strikes on the Gaza Strip since a 2014 war Saturday, killing two Palestinians, while dozens of rockets targeted Israel, but Hamas said a ceasefire had been reached late in the day.The exchange of fire followed months of tension that has raised the prospect of a fourth war in the blockaded Gaza Strip since 2008.Three Israelis were wounded when a rocket hit a house in the city of Sderot near the Gaza Strip, authorities said.The two Palestinians killed were aged 15 and 16, caught in an Israeli strike on a building they were near in the west of Gaza City, the enclave’s health ministry said.Twenty-five people were wounded across Gaza, the ministry said.Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum said late Saturday the Islamist movement, which runs the Gaza Strip, had agreed to an “Egyptian offer to return to a ceasefire to stop this escalation.”An Israeli military spokesman declined to comment, but said its actions would depend on what happens on the ground.Thick plumes of smoke rose over parts of the Gaza Strip as Israel hit dozens of targets it said belonged to militants, including a high-rise building allegedly used by Hamas as a training facility with a tunnel underneath.In Israel, air raid sirens sent people rushing to shelters in areas surrounding the Gaza Strip as rockets and mortars were fired from the Palestinian enclave at nearby communities.Israel said around 100 rockets and mortars were fired, mostly mortars.Hamas said it fired in defence in response to Israeli air strikes.- ‘The hardest blow’ -Israel blamed Hamas for the escalation, pointing to months of protests and clashes along the border that its military argues the Islamist movement is seeking to use as cover for attacks.There have also been hundreds of fires at Israeli farms caused by kites and balloons carrying firebombs from Gaza, leading to political pressure on the government and military to take action against Hamas.Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Hamas had been hit with “the hardest blow” since a 2014 war “and we will increase the strength of our attacks as necessary.”Hamas’s Barhoum said the group was responsible for the barrage against Israel and that it was carried out “in response to the Israeli air strikes”.”The protection and the defence of our people is a national duty and a strategic choice,” Barhoum said.- Border protests -Tensions have been building between Hamas and Israel for months over mass protests and clashes along the border fence.The protests have called for Palestinian refugees to return to their former homes now inside Israel.Since the protests and clashes broke out along the border on 30 March, at least 141 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli fire.The majority of those killed were involved in protests and clashes but others were seeking to breach or damage the border fence.No Israelis have been killed.In addition, the arson balloons and kites from Gaza have caused 750 fires and burned 2,600 hectares, leading to hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage, according to Israel’s fire service.On 9 July, Israel closed its only goods crossing with the Gaza Strip in response to the fires.Hamas called the move a “crime against humanity,” with Gaza already suffering from deep poverty and worsening humanitarian conditions.The border protests peaked on 14 May, when the United States moved its Israel embassy to the disputed city of Jerusalem, but have continued at a lower level since then.On Friday, Israeli troops shot and killed two Palestinians, including a teenager, and wounded hundreds of others in border clashes.An Israeli soldier was also moderately wounded when a grenade was thrown at him from the northern Gaza Strip, the military said.Molotov cocktails, flaming tyres and stones were also hurled in the direction of its soldiers, according to the Israeli army.Israel says its use of live fire is necessary to defend its borders and stop infiltrations. Palestinians and rights groups say unarmed protesters are being shot while posing no real threat.Israel’s army said Saturday’s strikes targeted military facilities belonging to Hamas.Among the main targets was the “Hamas Battalion HQ in Beit Lahia, which includes urban warfare training facilities, (a) weapon storage warehouse, training compounds, command centres, offices and more”, the Israeli army said in a statement.”A weapons manufacturing site and storage facilities housing various types of weapons, including Hamas’ naval capabilities” were also hit, the statement added.The Israeli army said air strikes carried out in the morning hit “complexes used to prepare arson terror attacks and a Hamas terror training facility”.”We are talking about the biggest offensive strikes since Protective Edge,” Air Force brigadier general Tzvika Haimovic told journalists, referring to Israel’s name for its 2014 operation in the Gaza Strip.last_img read more


Postgame Quotes Louisville vs Duke

first_img(On extending the defense): “Going into the game, we felt that the 2-2-1, we don’t do it very much, but we actually practiced it for this game. So, we felt we could do it. We did it one time in the first half and everything we did in the first half was not good. And maybe the sense of urgency… sometimes something you do doesn’t work because of the attitude you have when you do it. So, the sense of urgency made the defense work. My guys want to win. They’re good guys. They’re really good guys.” Print Friendly Version Louisville Head Coach Chris Mack(Opening Statement) “As tough as it was on Saturday to swallow, tougher. I’m really proud of my team. They competed their tails off.  We played as hard as we’ve played all year. We dominated the best team in the country for 30-something minutes, and we have to figure out how to close games. I say we, that’s me, that’s all of our players. We’ve got to figure out how to finish games and close games when teams are in panic mode and they’re drawing up defenses in the sand. Give Duke great credit, their kids never quit. They battled, they turned us over it seems like 1,000 times in the last four or five minutes. I’m stunned, but I love my group, I feel for them. As I said, I thought we outplayed the best team in the country for a long time and our team will grow from this. As hard as it is to accept, we’re going to grow from it and there will be better times.” (On the press and Goldwire’s performance) “Well, we’ve found something maybe in the press to have (freshman guard) Tre (Jones)…Jordan’s a really good athlete. He had the best look of anyone on the bench. Sometimes when you look down and he was sitting at the edge of his seat wanting to get in. So, let’s get him in, and then you didn’t want to take him out. And then, Tre is such a good defender. He was everywhere. He’s just everywhere. They were looking where our guys were and not attacking them. That’s because of the effort of all these guys.”(On the impact of the win) “I told my team, I said ‘You’re not losers, but you’re playing like losers.’ February is a crazy month, because it’s a long haul before March, and everybody is hungry. They’re trying to make their marks. These kids can already feel like they’ve made a mark. And so, you’re playing against somebody that can be hungrier than you, and our thing going into the game was ‘Play harder than them,’ and we weren’t able to do that. So, that’s a lesson for our guys. However, the other lesson is maybe Goldwire can play more, the 2-2-1 may be added to what we’re doing. What’ve we played? 24 games? They’ve played 24 games in their career. So, we can still learn a lot. We learned a lot tonight, and they didn’t give up, and they made really pressure free throws, pressure free throws. Then, Cam hit… his teammates you could even see right there, ‘Where is he?’, and just shoot it. So, confidence-wise, I think it adds a lot, and it gets Goldwire in the rotation there.”(On the team’s defensive performance earlier in the game) “Yeah, a little bit. Like, we missed a lot of shots. Like (freshman forward) RJ (Barrett), some of RJ’s shots around the bucket. Nothing. And then, we missed almost every free throw. We were in the 30s, and we’re a really good offensive team. It’s not about just jump shooting…and they were playing hard, it wasn’t just us missing. The defense, we didn’t talk right away. They have a really good offensive set because their centers can hit threes. I think they probably hit three tonight, and we didn’t defend that, and (junior center) Marques (Bolden) looked tired. And again, it’s been a long haul. We’ve been playing like crazy, and he’s a big guy. But, he wasn’t who he has been. The change in defense helped because we were still able to attack, and I think, then when we stayed in zone, we attacked more in the zone, instead of more just coming back in the zone. I don’t know, I think that that’s what happened. Who the hell knows?” (On the Virginia loss last year being similar and how to move on) “It’s sports. Adversity is a fact of life, man. You’re talking to a guy that had three ACL tears in college. Thought he was going to the NBA and, boom, God had a different plan. So if we have the opportunity to learn from some tough times and tough moments, then that is exactly what we are going aim to do. My belief in these guys is crazy strong and that’s not going go away after a really tough loss.  But hey man, you lose some tough ones. If you’re going be in sports at this level, it’s going happen.” (On recalling a similar type of game): “I’m not a big guy, I hope it’s not just because I’m getting older and my memory is not as good, I try not to think about the past. When people say do you remember the score? No. I do not. Sometimes a guy will come up to me and say, ‘I played against your team in ’84, do you remember me?’ No. No.” Duke Head Coach Mike Krzyzewski(Opening Statement) “Well, we were very fortunate. That was a great win for us, that their team played us for 30 minutes, not just outplayed, they outcompeted us. I commend them. They probably were more deserving of winning. But, in the last 10 minutes, we were spectacular, and in order to overcome that difference in competitive spirit, needed to be spectacular because it was that pronounced. We were down 23, and they played so well. We went to our 2-2-1, and we felt that that might help us before the game, but (sophomore guard) Jordan Goldwire really helped us. We had two guards out there that put a lot of pressure, and then, (freshman forward) Zion (Williamson) played the last part of the game with four fouls and played it great, and (freshman forward) Cam (Reddish) hit dagger shots. We did enough to overcome, really not just a point deficit, but an effort and competitive deficit. Again, there’s not a value there, but you could see it obviously—I saw it, and we won. The last 10 minutes, we were spectacular. Crazy, it’s a crazy game. Human beings are great. They can go from one thing to another. They’re really good. He’s (Louisville head coach Chris Mack) done such a good job here. This crowd, it’s one of the really great venues for college basketball, and so appreciative of the game. And what they’ve done is incorporate and brought back the past: what Denny (Crum) and Rick (Pitino) and people before them, and what they’ve made Louisville, one of the great programs in the history of college basketball. So, to get a chance and win a game like that here, I feel very proud that we were able to do that. I also understand the whole thing and I feel bad for them because they were so damn good, and I feel a little bit better for us. But, that doesn’t mean I don’t feel bad for them.” (On the explanation for last call was a charge on [Cam] Reddish and after went to the monitor and the foul was called it on Ryan [McMahon) “They said that Ryan’s heel was in the restricted arc, and obviously, it’s a reviewable play, I guess. And so I trust those guys and it’s on video so they’re not going to make that up.” Story Links (On believing the team would win with 10 minutes left to play) “It’s interesting. At the shootaround today, I was talking to Rece Davis, they were talking about leadership, and I said one of the things—I had Roger Federer on my show last week and I talked about his strong face. I said, ‘In order to be really good, you have to have a strong face and strong mannerisms, even if you don’t feel strong.’ And at West Point, that was one of things I learned as a cadet: even when you don’t feel like it’s going to go, your men better not see that in you, and as a result, you can speak into action sometimes. I did think that we could play better. I was hoping we wouldn’t lose by 35—I’m not kidding, we could have. So, you’re talking positive, but I don’t believe it. Once that press was going, I said, ‘We’ve got a chance here. We can get it.’ But, at that point, I think I may have been telling them a lie. As a cadet, it would be social honor, it wasn’t really something I needed to do. This is a crazy night, really as a coach, because I’ve been doing it so long. I really feel bad for them. I literally feel bad for them. They were so damn prepared for us, so well prepared, and my level of respect was already high, but it’s even higher after this game.” (On whether some of the late turnovers came from being panicky) “I don’t think they were trying to make bigger plays. I think they were playing timid. You know, we haven’t played timid all year. But, when you get in that situation, they’re humans. They’re great humans. It’s one of those things where, when they saw the lead evaporate, they’re trying to make the best play they can. But my job is to keep these guys up. I told them, that’s the best team in the country and for 30 some odd minutes we were clearly better.” (On if he is surprised by Mack’s success in year one): “I’m not surprised because he was terrific at Xavier. And you know, look, if you coach here, you’re going to be good. You’re going to be good. This one of the great programs. Kids want to come here. Fans want to go in those stands and they want to go nuts and they want to support their team. He’s good. Other than that, I don’t know what else you need.”center_img (On being to be able to handle the full-court press) “Same things we’ve been doing for six months since our staff arrived. We’re not going to get a magic potion sprinkled over our guys. Or come up with some elaborate press-break . We just have to be men with the ball. We’ve got to meet our passes. We have to pass fake and we have to make the right decisions.” (On Duke’s pressure being bothersome) “We’ve been bothered by several long athletic teams. We have smaller guards but it’s no excuse. We’ve got to be able to catch the ball in our spot just like we did for the first 30 minutes. When they extend full court pressure we’ve got to be able to break it and get us in something and find the soft spots, be able to pass fake, meet passes and finish.”  (Are you concerned that this is going linger and how do you stop that from happening) “Sure it’s a concern.  But, I also feel like I have some of the best guys in the country in that locker room. They have great character. We come back on Thursday, we practice again and keep stressing the same things we do every single day. And just try to grow from it and get better.” (On Louisville defense in the first half compared to the second): “They were playing great defense and they are really good. They didn’t let you get into the lane. Very similar to what Virginia did Saturday except we hit 13 out of 21 threes. On Saturday, we didn’t hit anything. Panic isn’t the right word, but we lost confidence. And we just looked bad. We just looked bad. In the second half, because we got runs, their defense wasn’t set up, we got it off of turnovers, rebounds. And we got shots before their defense was set up and attacked the basket. One of the biggest plays of the game was Tre’s steal when it was 69-64. I think if he doesn’t do that then we’re not going to win. I thought they was a huge play.” (On Duke switching to the full-court pressure into the zone) “That’s a great question. I think that our spacing was pretty good, we were just tentative. Every pass was like they wanted it to get to their teammate and that tentativeness becomes a negative when you have such a great anticipating team. We had to be a lot more sure with what we want to do. If he’s 50-50 in the passing lane; pass, fake hard, get him out of the passing lane, bounce pass to the logo and then play from there and we didn’t do that.” (On what Chris Mack tells his team after this loss): “Look, he’s a hell of a coach. They were worthy of winning. I mean, they were worthy of winning. The crowd was great. It was close to being like an amazing celebration of how well they played and how well Louisville supports their team. Look, we were spectacular for nine-and-a-half minutes. And it was just good enough to make do.” (About fighting the urge to nurse the clock) “That’s when I tried to relay to our guys during the course of the play is that, ‘are you open? Sure.’ But Malik, and this isn’t all on one guy this is on all of us, but a shot with 26, 25 seconds on the shot clock from your center from the three, you can probably get that look really any time. So, let’s try to prey on their panic and in passing lanes, pass fake, and get layups and open shots at the end of the clock.”  (On the way things went for the first 35 minutes) “I thought, we’d get up 23, we took some quick shots. Our maturity, our ability to be in that moment, maybe for the first time for some but some of us it wasn’t handled the best way. You know you’re up 23, 19 whatever it is, you don’t want to call a timeout in that situation. You want to get that message relayed to our guys but I thought there were a few times where we took quick shots and although they may have been open shots, it didn’t allow us to get where we needed to get defensively in transition to get matched up and make it a five-on-five game. Again there are a lot of different areas that we’ve got to learn from and that part when we went from 23 to about 12, that’s a big area we’ve got to grow from.”  (On the half-court offense becoming stagnant when Duke went into a zone) “We were out of sorts because the time we crossed the ball across the half-court line, we were limited in our time in our shot clock. They were in a very, very extended 2-3 zone and their hands were everywhere. Although we talked about getting the ball to the logo a few of the times that we did, we missed a shot in there, we turned it over when we got the ball in there. With how spread out they were, that’s where we needed to get it, and we didn’t handle their zone. We just didn’t do it. You give them great credit. They have makeup ability and athleticism, length that most teams in college don’t have. Had we handled it better, maybe made a few shots when we did get open looks, then we’d be sitting here with a much different feeling.”last_img read more


Game of Thrones Is Coming Back to HBO in April 2019

first_img Winter is coming for your TV screens: HBO announced that the final season of Game of Thrones will launch in April 2019.Today, HBO teased a trailer for Season 8 of Game of Thrones on Twitter, which shows crazy shots of Daenerys Targaryen, Jon Snow, and The Night King as they fight for the battle of their lives. The trailer is captioned with “Every battle. Every betrayal. Every risk. Every fight. Every sacrifice. Every death. All #ForTheThrone.”Every battle.Every betrayal.Every risk.Every fight.Every sacrifice.Every death.All #ForTheThrone. pic.twitter.com/WReVt473SH— Game Of Thrones (@GameOfThrones) November 13, 2018HBO hasn’t disclosed which day in April Game of Thrones will premiere on, so fans will have to wait. However, HBO has started to prepare some of its prequel series pitches for Game of Thrones spinoffs, according to Vulture. So, the Game of Thrones story isn’t quite over yet.More on Geek.com:Dragons Make ‘Game of Thrones: Conquest’ a Real ScorcherConquer Westeros On Your Phone With Game of Thrones: ConquestSee How Extra Game of Thrones Is With This Anime-Styled Opening ‘Game of Thrones’ Director Explains Why Arya Ambushed the Night King’Game of Thrones’ Star Sophie Turner Predicts Sansa Stark’s Future Stay on targetlast_img read more


Women paid low despite equal education

first_imgWomen are at par with men in education but have failed to secure equal access to quality jobs and representation in the government, finds a global study that suggests the need for greater policy interventions to close gender barriers.The findings, from more than 150 countries, showed that women have reached 91 per cent of the education that men have. Yet, they have reached only 70 per cent of the male rate of employment. In more than half the world’s countries, female education rates are now similar, or greater, than men, up from 33 per cent in 1990. Despite these gains, the paper published in the Journal of African Development, showed that women’s employment rates are 30 per cent lower than men’s – even less in some regions of Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The share of women employed in the relatively high-paying industrial sector compared to men has dropped 20 percentage points since 1990. “Men have more of the high paying jobs, so women are squeezed into lower-paid positions. And female unemployment continues to be about 30 per cent higher than men’s, worldwide; so those women are not able to earn their own livelihood,” said Stephanie Seguino, economist at University of Vermont in US. Greater exclusion from high-paying jobs and a disproportionate amount of unpaid household work, including care for children and ageing parents, offer two key reasons for women’s lower employment and income, the researchers said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixFurther, the gender gap is seen to be widest in political representation. Overall, women share of parliamentary seats is 25 per cent compared to men’s. But, political representation for women has increased from 14 per cent in 1990 when compared to men. Legislative bodies in some nations, including Haiti and Qatar, still have no female members.Whereas countries such as Canada, Rwanda, Norway have adopted political gender based quotas to improve female representation in government. “Without women, governments are more likely to spend taxpayer money in ways that disproportionately benefit men – or at least ignore the extra burdens on women,” Seguino explained.last_img read more


Hopping Over UC Hurdles

first_img 6 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. By Rivka LittleThere’s a moment in the adoption process of most technologies when employees stop looking upon it as a burden and begin wondering how they ever lived without it. For smaller business users, it’s this “aha moment” that seems to pull them past their initial apathy toward unified communications (UC) — the integration of multiple modes of communications (voice, e-mail, instant messaging, etc.) with business processes. But user resistance is only one piece of the UC rollout puzzle: There’s also setting user access policy and security. The catch is that security and access guidelines often differ by industry, which makes setting hard-and-fast rules challenging, but these policies are vital to driving user acceptance toward that aha moment and keeping the momentum going beyond it.The experience of Ohio-based Celina Insurance Group, a 168-employee firm, illustrates how initially disinterested, even resistant, employees come to value UC. The company rolled out IBM’s Lotus Sametime offering in 2000 and immediately met employee indifference. “The average age in the company was 56 years old — not your ideal group to roll out instant chat — so it presented some challenges,” says Robert Shoenfelt, Celina’s CIO.Celina works with a large pool of independent agents, who sell policies from dozens of insurance companies. To be competitive, the company must act as swiftly as its much larger rivals. IBM’s Sametime provided Celina with multiuser meetings, instant chat, and integration of data for presence awareness among other applications via a Web interface. Agents in the field could use instant chat to contact Celina underwriters about customer problems or new policies. Celina employees could also IM each other internally to solve problems while they had an agent in a separate chat. “At first, our underwriters were not happy when we put it online for agents” because they felt continually interrupted, Shoenfelt says. The CIO quashed their annoyance. “When you can tell me when the phone is going to ring, I’ll tell you when you’re going to get a message,” he told them.Then there was the top-down acceptance at Celina when employees realized that the company CEO had learned the technology. “There was a picture of him in his leather jacket and sunglasses [with his identity on the site]. People said, ‘If he’s going to use it, I guess I’m going to do it, too,'” Shoenfelt laughs.Ultimately, acceptance came once incoming requests were handled more easily, eliminating backlog, and people could suddenly work at home as efficiently as at the office. “Everybody latched on,” Shoenfelt says, adding that Sametime changed the culture of the company.Akiba Saeedi, IBM’s program director of unified communications and collaboration, calls it the “stickiness factor.” UC is more likely to be accepted when you “inject it into the [existing] business process” to simplify employees’ lives.Cisco VP of SMB solutions marketing Rick Moran says vendors must spend time with clients assessing their actual needs and then fitting the solution to their business model. “You have to go in and ask customers the exact problems that they’re trying to deal with.” Cisco offers an answer to the immediate problem and then tries to make the solution scalable to deal with expected growth over the next few years, Moran says.If convenience isn’t enough, economic incentive tends to inspire acceptance pretty quickly, says Christian Chase, managing partner of Florida-based Everything Tradeshows, which implemented Cisco’s Unified Communications 500 Series for Small Business. Cisco’s solution converged voice and data, voice mail and automated attendant, and implemented VoIP. Immediately, Everything Tradeshows’ telemarketer increased her speed and productivity. When she was able to dial calls straight from Outlook, it made a difference, considering she generally makes upward of 200 calls a day, Chase says. “As soon as employees realize they can make more money, they know they need this,” he adds.Gartner analyst and research VP Bern Elliot says real user acceptance comes from solid training and the understanding that some user groups will have a longer adoption period. “If you force it, it will create stress,” says Elliot. “Prolonged training reduces stress.” Training updates are also crucial “because people forget,” he adds.But before companies can convince users to be comfortable with the technology, they have to deal with security issues and user access policy. Elliot says security policy should come from the IT side of a company even if there is telephony involved. “Telecom is often already protected, but data is more flexible and more challenging to protect,” he says.Celina Insurance’s Shoenfelt says the company feels safe with Sametime’s built-in security for data, but chat does concern him. The company is concerned about “what’s discoverable from a legal standpoint.” Though Celina is comparatively small, it’s impossible to monitor all 168 employees in addition to outside agents in every chat session. “We don’t save chats,” Shoenfelt says. “It’s become our way of doing business. We worry about what’s appropriate and what’s not.”Moran says Cisco’s firewall offers protection, but human error is always a threat. He offers up two tips for SMBs. “Don’t have things hanging open. Turn on the firewall and wireless security,” he says. Then he stresses, “Don’t underestimate backup.” When companies have tons of data living on a laptop, that laptop “can get dropped” and then, regardless of your UC solution and security, it’s lost.Though most out-of-the-box UC solutions now marketed to SMBs have built-in security, some industries have extra data security needs. Saeedi notes that health care companies must follow legal regulations for keeping customer information safe. Government agencies and banks have unique protection needs as well. These companies should hire consultants or attorneys that specialize in setting data security policy and strategy for their particular industry. Often these consultants work with channel partners that offer ongoing IT maintenance for UC applications.Security also comes into question when companies decide how much data should be exposed to various groups of employees. Chase says his company carefully determined what kinds of data access each employee needed. Then users were given passwords that allowed access only to their specific data needs.Saeedi points out that deciding user access can also be about how much bandwidth the company wants utilized. She says IT staff should ask themselves, “Do you want to turn video on? In some cases, maybe only some users will be enabled for video.” Sametime enables IT staff to offer different users individualized groups of applications.Despite the initial challenges, Chase and Shoenfelt agree that implementing UC enabled their companies to compete efficiently against much larger competitors. More importantly, their newfound efficiency has given customers in both instances the experience of having worked with a major company with lots of support resources despite the small size of each firm. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. April 2, 2008 Enroll Now for Free Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowlast_img read more


What Is Intel Optane The Memory That Gives Hard Drives SSD Speeds

first_imgThe Intel Optane component you can purchase separately lets you upgrade your desktop’s hard-drive speeds. However, there is a set of minimum system requirements for getting the memory module working on your rig. You need a 7th Gen Intel Core CPU (Core i3, i5 or i7) or later, an Intel 200-series chipset or newer, and an M.2 2280 slot with two or four PCIe data lanes. Desktops and laptops equipped with Celeron, Pentium or older Core processors won’t support Optane. Your rig must also run the 64-bit Windows 10 operating system and have Intel Rapid Storage Technology 15.5 or newer installed.Intel Optane cost and availabilityBuying a laptop or desktop with Optane memory will simplify things, but you can always add it to your device if it meets the aforementioned requirements.One major benefit of Optane is that you don’t need as much memory to see performance gains. This helps keep pricing relatively low. The 16GB M.2 memory, which Intel claims is best used for mainstream usage, costs $34 on Amazon at the time of writing. The larger 32GB model, which is better for gaming and professional use, goes for $54.Designed for the most demanding workloads, Intel’s Optane-based SSDs are extremely fast and exorbitantly priced. A 960GB version of the 905P model costs a resounding $1,300.Credit: Intel; ShutterstockPorts GuideScreen GuideUSB Type-C FAQ Is your computer sluggish? It could be that your old spinning hard drive isn’t cutting it anymore. As we’ve said before, the easiest way to improve the performance of a PC is to purchase a solid-state drive; however, SSDs are considerably more expensive than hard-disk drives in terms of dollar per gigabyte.Fear not, Intel has a solution. First unveiled in 2017, Optane is a memory module designed to ramp up PC speeds for less money. It promises a better computing experience for every user, from gamers to power users. Sound too good to be true? Here’s what you need to know about Intel Optane.MacBook Air vs MacBook Pro: Which 13-inch MacBook Is Right For You?Apple’s entry-level MacBook Air and Pro look pretty similar, but our testing proved they differ in crucial ways.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Which Cheap Tablet Is Best? Amazon Fire 7 vs Walmart Onn02:45关闭选项Automated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/intel-optane-memory-faq?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0003:4603:46 Quick Summary:Intel Optane is a new, superfast memory module. The main benefit of Optane is improved storage performance. Laptop makers sell notebooks with Optane memory, or you can buy it online. Intel Optane costs $34 and $54 for 16GB and 32GB, respectively.What is Intel Optane?At its core, Intel Optane is a technology system designed to greatly improve storage speeds by caching your computer’s most frequently used processes for the hard drive. The technology uses 3D XPoint, a new type of memory that its creators, Micron and Intel, claim is 1,000 times faster than traditional NAND flash.With its new memory type, Optane enables what Intel calls “system acceleration,” or faster task completion and reduced wait times when compared to spinning hard drives without Optane. For everyday users, this means your favorite applications will load significantly faster than they did before.Buy Intel Optane Memory Module 16 GB on Amazon.comIt’s important to note that Intel Optane is not a replacement for DRAM — rather, it works in conjunction with it. Using intelligent algorithms, Optane accesses and remembers long-term memory, or what remains on your computer after it’s powered off. This results in decreased wait times when you load games, documents, pictures and apps. Despite how some OEMs misleadingly list Intel Optane, it does not act as primary system memory, like DRAM, which accesses short-term memory until your laptop is turned off.Buy Intel Optane Memory Module 32 GB on Amazon.comIntel Optane is used in two different ways. Since it launched last year, Optane has been available as 16GB and 32GB PCIe M.2 memory modules used to accelerate a conventional hard drive in the same manner as an SSD cache. Intel claims that a desktop or laptop equipped with a hard drive as primary storage and a secondary Optane cache could load Windows 10 faster than a laptop with an SSD.MORE: Which Laptop CPU is Right for You?The other form Optane takes on is in a series of Intel SSDs equipped with 3D XPoint memory. The latest product in the SSD lineup, the 905P, is lightning-fast and remarkably expensive.How much faster will Optane make my PC?Thanks to the superfast memory, laptops with Optane technology are much faster and more responsive than those without it. Specifically, Optane enables faster boot times, application load times and data load times, and can improve the PC experience for a variety of users, from those who simply browse the web to professional power users.According to Intel, an 8th Gen Intel Core processor with Optane performs everyday tasks 2.2 times faster than a CPU without the memory tech. Additionally, large files are estimated to open three times faster than they would without Optane.Buy Intel Optane SSD 900P Series on Amazon.comGamers on a budget should also consider a laptop equipped with an Optane cache. According to Intel, 8th Gen Intel Core processors armed with Optane memory allow for 4.7 times faster loading times than computers without it. Better yet, since Optane works with traditional hard drives, gamers can keep their large storage capacities without sacrificing SSD-type speeds.MORE: Laptops with the Longest Battery LifeWhile that all sounds impressive, what is more relevant to consumers is how Optane performs in the real world. So far, the technology has impressed. Our sister site, Tom’s Hardware, called the Intel Optane SSD 905P — a high-end drive for desktops and workstation — the “fastest SSD ever made.” And, using the SYSmark benchmark, AnandTech determined that a 32GB Optane memory module improved the response time of a conventional HDD across the board and even outperformed SSDs on some tests. Unfortunately, those gains come at the expense of power consumption, so expect Optane-powered laptops to have worse battery life.What system requirements are there for Optane?If you’re buying a new laptop with Optane, the technology will come preinstalled. Laptop makers — Dell, HP, Lenovo — already sell laptops outfitted with Optane cache drives alongside high-capacity HDDs. Specific laptops with configurations that include Optane memory include the Dell Inspiron 15 5000, the Lenovo Ideapad 330s and the HP 15-da0032. Note, however, that adding Optane to an old laptop is tricky, since OEMs need to push a BIOS update for Optane to work with their motherboard. It’s possible, but even the most tech-savvy customers will find it difficult to add Optane into an existing laptop. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GameIf you’re over 40 – this game is a must!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoKelley Blue Book5 Mid-engine Corvettes That Weren’tKelley Blue BookUndoGrepolis – Free Online GameGamers Around the World Have Been Waiting for this GameGrepolis – Free Online GameUndoCNN International for ANAWhy Tennis Pundits Are Tipping This WomanCNN International for ANAUndoVerizon WirelessThis new phone will blow your mind.Verizon WirelessUndoTODAYPolice Identify Girl Licking Ice Cream Tub In Viral VideoTODAYUndoAdvertisementlast_img read more


SwissRay Highlights Latest DR X Ray Technology

first_img Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. During RSNA 2012, SwissRay featured its new DDR Versa Motion Plus X-ray system. The technologist selects a body part to be images and the X-ray head automatically swings into the proper imaging position. The head includes a touch-screen where information can be entered at the patient bedside. Also featured were the DDR Cruze mobile DR X-Ray system and the DDR Shift retrofit kit that enables conversion of mobile CR systems to wireless DR. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Information Technology View all 220 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Recent Videos View all 606 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting.center_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Sponsored Content | Videos | Digital Radiography (DR) | December 07, 2012 SwissRay Highlights Latest DR X -Ray Technology Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. SwissRay Highlights Latest DR X -Ray TechnologyVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:04Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:04 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more


Business high for tourism brochure distribution company

first_imgVisitorPoint’s distribution services hit a record high for December 2017. Image credit: Colin WalkingtonBusiness high for tourism brochure distribution companyNew Zealand-based brochure distribution company VisitorPoint finished 2017 with its biggest month on record.The company’s distribution services hit a record high for December 2017, close to 1.3 million brochures dispatched in December alone, up 11 percent on December 2016.More than 10.9 million brochures were distributed in 2017.VisitorPoint is New Zealand’s only national distributor of travel and tourism information, having distributed brochures throughout New Zealand for more than 30 years.Delighted about placing more tourism products in market than ever before, business development manager Jenni Powell said the increase was a big accomplishment, especially in today’s digital age.“Printed tourism brochures are certainly not a thing of the past in New Zealand,” she said.“More than 38 percent of visitors are using travel brochures as a primary source of information for bookings.“December is always a particularly busy month for us but to see such a significant percentage increase nationally is really impressive.“We’ve been working really hard to help spread national growth into the regions, alongside Tourism New Zealand’s efforts to promote regional growth.”Distribution in Northland, Marlborough and Dunedin grew significantly with over 30 percent increase in each region.Mrs Powell said the growth was a result of growing demand, the company’s suite of products and increased accessibility of advertisers to potential clients and trade.“After a bumper year of growth, we’re looking ahead to our target of 11 million brochures for 2018, and continuing to grow and develop in the regions beyond the popular tourist spots.”With offices in Queenstown, Christchurch and Auckland, the company has over 2000 physical display outlets nationally, and 30 staff including 19 high-profile merchandisers who are constantly on the road supplying its 36 distribution circuits.Source = VisitorPointlast_img read more