Parking meters to become active in January

first_img… as installation commencesBY RAMONA LUTHIDespite obvious protests against the implementation of parking meters throughout the streets of Georgetown, the City’s Town Clerk, Royston King, has announced that by January 9, 2017, all parking meters will be fully installed and working.This was disclosed on Wednesday during the parking meter launch, when the Managing Director of Smart City Solutions, Amir Oren and his Public Relations Officer (PRO) Kit Nascimento, in the company of King and other City Hall representatives met with members of the public and the media.Prior to this, it was disclosed that the parking meters will be completely installed around the city by the end of December; as such, the controversial meters are now installed on a few streets in Georgetown, namely Avenue of the Republic and Regent Street, among others.King expressed happiness towards the implementation of the parking meters, which he described as a “bold initiative.”“This project has utility in three areas. First of all, the environment and sustainability, the other area is infrastructural development, and the third area is city economics,” he said.The Town Clerk went on to announce that the funds garnered from the initiative will be re-invested to upgrade roads and similar facilities, including the development of cycling lanes and also to introduce, install and operate the “City transit system, particularly for senior citizens and children.”King stated that for now, though, some parking meters are installed, and no one will pay for parking until next year, adding that he hoped persons will become acquainted with the electronic device.Managing Director of Smart City Solutions, Amir Oren asserted that the introductory period for the parking meters will be launched as of January 9, 2017, and members of the public will be taught how to use the machines.“The system is very easy to use. As I’ve said many times before, Georgetown is not the first, nor the last to introduce a system like this which is very important, not only to parking but mobility,” he posited.Town Clerk Royston King; Managing Directors of Smart City Solutions, Amir Oren and Simon Moshevilli and other City Hall representatives at the launch of the metersHe expressed confidence that those who are against the parking meters presently will be much more receptive of it once they become acquainted.The parking meters will be charging a fee of $50 plus Value Added Tax (VAT) every 15 minutes of parking along the streets of Georgetown. This will also be mandatory to public transportation, until preparations are made for alternative parking spaces.Recently, Oren had said that the implementation would be divided into two phases, adding that the first phase of the parking meter project will occupy 3237 parking spaces in Georgetown, utilising 157 parking meters.The machines will be stationed close to all the commercial hubs in Georgetown. The meters, intended to regulate traffic, will be situated along Quamina Street, Water Street, Hadfield Street, Camp Street, Church Street, North Road, Robb Street, Regent Street, Charlotte Street, South Road, Croal Street, Brickdam, Avenue of the Republic, Wellington Street and King Street.From its genesis, the parking meter project was rejected by citizens and the Private Sector. However, the “shady” contract was endorsed by the Government, which after scrutinising of the contract, stated that no illegalities were found, and so the project was given the “go ahead”.At that time, the project was being spearheaded by Kamau Cush, who was named the Director of Smart City Solutions. However, just a few weeks ago, the company’s PRO stated that Cush was only a shareholder of the company and was no longer operational.The company’s PRO also stated that the parking meters would be operational from 07:00h to 19:00h Mondays to Saturdays. However, parking is free any time before 07:00h and after19:00h, on Sundays and holidays.last_img read more


Kilauea eruption an opportunity for undersea scrutiny

first_imghttps://youtu.be/Pfsh5FPiigQCAPTION: Video by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan, taken from a helicopter on July 16, shows lava from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaii as it moves from the volcano to the sea. Morgan and her colleagues spent a week placing ocean-bottom seismic instruments off the southeastern shore of the island. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University)Images for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-1-web-2o6dob0.jpgLava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) Lava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) Rice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) Return to article. Long Description http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-3-web-2bj6qci.jpgRice University researchers who joined colleagues on the Big Island of Hawaii this month to place seismic instruments also took the opportunity to fly over the ongoing eruption of Kilauea July 16. With their pilot and standing from left: Jackie Caplan-Auerbach of Western Washington University, Julia Morgan of Rice, Yang Shen of the University of Rhode Island and David Blank of Rice. (Credit: Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-4-web-23ssyf1.jpgRice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) Lava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) A cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-2-web-28hl50e.jpgLava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) Rice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionBlank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. Photo courtesy of David Blank“The frequency of these failures is very low and the interval between them is very high,” Morgan said. “We think this happened at Kilauea between 25,000 and 50,000 years ago, and we know it happened on (adjacent volcano) Mauna Loa about 100,000 years ago, and probably more than once before that.”While the risk of an imminent avalanche is slim, she said, the eruption, earthquake and aftershocks presented an irresistible opportunity to get a better look at the island’s hidden terrain. Every new quake that occurs along Kilauea’s rift zones and around the perimeter of the Hilina Slump and the bench helps the researchers understand the terrain.Morgan said the United States Geological Survey, which operates the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, has a host of ground-based seismometers but none in the ocean. She said monitors at sea will reveal quakes under the bench that are too small for land seismometers to sense.“The (initial) earthquake seems to have caused earthquakes beneath the outer bench,” Morgan said. “If that outer bench is the buttress to the slump, and that bench is beginning to show seismicity, it’s moving. At what point does it collapse?”The seismometers are deployed around the Hilina Slump, close to shore where lava is entering the ocean and on the outer bench in line with the initial quake. “That way, aftershocks from the earthquake could be picked up and would record characteristics of the fault zone that slipped,” she said. Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan.“They’re still going on,” said Morgan, who returned to Houston last week after seven days aboard a vessel deployed to place instruments and map the area. “In addition, a bunch of earthquakes occurred in other portions of the (island) flank. That’s what really got my attention.”Her interest in geologic structures, particularly relating to volcano deformation and faulting, led her to study the ocean bed off the Big Island’s coast for years. In a 2003 paper, Morgan and her colleagues used marine seismic reflection data to look inside Kilauea’s underwater slope for the boundaries of an active landslide, the Hilina Slump, as well as signs of previous avalanches.The researchers determined that the Hilina Slump is restricted to the upper slopes of the volcano, and the lower slopes consist of a large pile of ancient avalanche debris that was pushed by Kilauea’s sliding, gravity-driven flank into a massive, mile-high bench about 15 miles offshore. This outer bench currently buttresses the Hilina Slump, preventing it from breaking away from the volcano slopes.“We mapped out the geometry and extent of the slump and tried to develop a history of how it came to be,” she said of the paper.“Essentially, Kilauea is a bulldozer sliding out on the ocean crust and scraping off packages of strata that have accumulated,” Morgan said. The Hilina Slump rides on top of the sliding flank, she said. Return to article. Long DescriptionLava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. Photo by David Blank-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Slope failure and volcanic spreading along the submarine south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2003JB002411Instability of Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 4 in “Characteristics of Hawaiian Volcanoes” (USGS): https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp18014Julia Morgan bio: https://earthscience.rice.edu/directory/user/100/Rice Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences: https://earthscience.rice.eduWiess School of Natural Sciences: https://naturalsciences.rice.eduVideo: Lava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionLava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. Photo by Julia Morgan“If this outer bench is experiencing earthquakes, we want to know what surfaces are experiencing them. Along the base? Within the bench? Some new fault that we didn’t know about? This data will provide us the ability to determine what structures, or faults, are actually slipping.”While Blank worked days on the ship to help deploy the instruments, Morgan chose the night shift for mapping – and a better view of lava hitting the water. After their duty at sea, both took the unique opportunity to book a helicopter flight over the volcano, following the river of lava to the sea.“If you’re following the flows, you can look down and watch the lava tear across the countryside,” she said. “Then you go out to the lava ocean entry. You see these littoral explosions as the lava is flowing into the ocean. You might get a big pulse of lava and suddenly it gets cooled and quenched so rapidly that it just explodes up into the air.”They also spent time talking with locals in Hilo, the largest city on the main island, about the eruption that has already claimed more than 700 homes. “People there know they live with Pele,” Morgan said. “I found they were generally sanguine about it. Sad, but they knew that something like this could happen.“It’s a tragedy, for sure, but it’s also nature doing what nature does.” Rice University researchers who joined colleagues on the Big Island of Hawaii this month to place seismic instruments also took the opportunity to fly over the ongoing eruption of Kilauea July 16. With their pilot and standing from left: Jackie Caplan-Auerbach of Western Washington University, Julia Morgan of Rice, Yang Shen of the University of Rhode Island and David Blank of Rice. (Credit: Rice University) Lava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) A cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801) Rice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description Rice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-6-web-1webbsy.jpgA cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-5-web-1ygq81s.jpgRice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) ShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to video and high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduKilauea eruption an opportunity for undersea scrutinyRice University researchers help deliver seismometers to analyze Hawaiian volcano, quakesHOUSTON – (July 23, 2018) – Rice University researchers joined a team of scientists placing seismometers under the ocean off the coast of Hawaii, where the ongoing eruption of Kilauea has already claimed more than 700 homes and added to the island’s landmass. The researchers hope for new insight about the landscape under the ocean floor.Video by Rice Professor Julia Morgan, taken from a helicopter on July 16, shows lava from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaii as it moves from the volcano to the sea. Morgan and her colleagues spent a week placing ocean-bottom seismic instruments off the southeastern shore of the island.Julia Morgan, a professor of Earth, environmental and planetary sciences, and student David Blank were awarded a National Science Foundation RAPID grant to join a team of researchers and seed the seafloor with a dozen seismic detectors off the southeastern coast of the island in the wake of the 6.9 magnitude earthquake that occurred at the start of the eruption of Kilauea May 4.The instruments will gather data until September, when they will be retrieved, and are expected to provide an extensive record of earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of the world’s most active volcano over two months. Return to article. Long DescriptionA cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. Click on the image for a larger version. Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey“Remarkably, after this earthquake, all the boundaries of the slump also lit up with small earthquakes. These clearly occurred on a different fault than the main earthquake, suggesting that the slump crept downslope during or after that event,” she said.Morgan said the bench appears to be stable, presumably supporting the slump — although if it collapsed, the slump would follow and the results could be catastrophic. “If the slump were to fail catastrophically, it would create an amazing tsunami that would hit the West Coast. We have not seen this in historic times,” she said. Return to article. 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