Test your smarts on the rise of skeletons and raising the dead

first_img Bird poop. Every year, migratory seabirds paint Arctic rocks with their guano—or poop—as they nestle in for the summer. And that high volume of ammonia-rich poop, it turns out, has a slight cooling effect on the atmosphere. Ammonia emissions unleash summertime bursts of particles that go on to form the nuclei of clouds. These low-lying clouds reflect incoming sunlight and ultimately have a cooling effect on the region. But don’t expect the nations of the world to be investing in backed-up birds anytime soon: The clouds counteract only a fraction of the warming from carbon dioxide. Photosynthesis. Plants get hurt by too much sun just like humans, and to protect themselves, they convert some of the light hitting them into heat. That slows photosynthesis, which takes a while to rev back up. Now, scientists have found a faster way of turning over the photosynthesis engine. In genetically engineered tobacco plants, the method has increased biomass by up to 20%. That could be very good news for a planet with a population of 7.5 billion and counting. An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. Clone humans Enter for a chance to win. We’ll select a new winner each week. Ceres November 21, 2016 How did you score on the quiz? Challenge your friends to a science news duel! Question Poor weather conditions Raise the dead Australia You Official rules for the News from Science weekly quiz sweepstakes LOADING Every Monday, The Science Quiz tests your knowledge of the week’s biggest science news stories. No matter how much you know, you’re still likely to learn something–give it a try! Average Killed the dinosaurs. Armageddon it was not, at least for human film critics. But for the dinosaurs, it meant the end some 66 million years ago. Now, scientists have for the first time drilled deep into the impact left behind by the asteroid. Their discovery—rocks from deep in the crust placed out of order on top of sedimentary rocks—supports something known as the “dynamic collapse theory” of formation for the crater rings. It may also explain how similar craters scattered throughout the solar system came to be. Florida Clone cows Hyperactive mitochondria Exploding pulsars Which celestial body may soon join Europa and Enceladus in the “underground ocean club?” New planets forming Pluto. Hundreds of images from this summer’s New Horizons mission showed a large, ice-filled, heart-shaped basin on the surface of everyone’s favorite dwarf planet. It turns out that Pluto has a heavy heart. After an asteroid hit its surface billions of years ago, the resulting basin filled with nitrogen ice, creating an extra weight that tilted the dwarf planet by nearly 60°, a new study suggests. But the icy glacial pocket might be only part of the story. Another new study says that a massive underground ocean may have also helped shift Pluto’s center of gravity. Win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Just submit the required contact information to enter. The Science Quiz They’re wearing the color black. What might be one cause of fast radio bursts, hard-to-detect flashes in outer space that carry immense amounts of energy? A shift in ocean chemistry Skele-gro potion Tatooine They want to travel to a remote destination. The results of a massive study of taxi drivers in Beijing show avoiding certain passengers based on their destination is profitable. Researchers used GPS records shared by more than 12,000 taxi drivers in Beijing, who agreed to provide route data for 2 months in 2012. It turns out that trips to remote places, no matter how long the drive, pay less over the course of the day because the drivers waste time getting back to dense areas. Click to enter Uptake of electrolytes Scientists last week reported on a drilling expedition into the Chicxulub impact crater, left behind by the asteroid that did this: 0 Raise the dead. Sort of. The Indian Council of Medical Research axed a study to bring brain-dead individuals back to a minimally conscious state, in which they would be able to perform tasks like moving their eyes to track objects. There is little evidence that this could work, and scientists and physicians have raised concerns about the ethics of the trial. But leaders of the ReAnima project say the study will go on: If necessary, they will pursue their trial outside India. Soil composition Chernobyl. In April 1986, an explosion and fire destroyed the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant’s Unit 4 reactor, spreading radioactive contamination from Ukraine across a wide swath of Europe. Engineers are finally putting the finishing touches on the New Safe Confinement, an arch-shaped structure that will fully encapsulate the reactor and contain any lingering radioactive materials. How did animals get their skeletons? New research shows this landmass shifts back and forth by millimeters each year: Freeze time This famous site got a new confinement arch—a giant shield to contain hazardous material—just last week: Water transport to leaves Killed the dinosaurs Hawaii Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit Fukushima reactor Australia. A large-scale movement of water between the Southern and Northern hemispheres triggers seasonal undulations—it slowly shifts 1 millimeter to the northwest and dips down 2 to 3 millimeters on its northwestern side. When winter comes, it shuffles back by the same amount, while its southeastern coast does the downward dipping. The newly discovered motions could help track seasonal shifts in the world’s water, as well as what such shifts do to our planet’s center of mass. Top Ranker They want to travel to a remote destination. They look too “angry.” Ice T Scientists announced last week that this unexpected item might help cool the Arctic: Time’s Up! The Washington, D.C., swamp Japan Enter the information below to enter the sweepstakes:Your information has been submitted.An error occurred submitting the email. Please try again later.This email has already been entered.The email submitted is not a valid email.Incomplete form. Please fill out all fields. 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I would like to receive emails about products and services offered by AAAS advertisers.PRIVACY I have read and accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.Submit Pluto Tilted Earth 90° Gave Roger Ebert indigestion Three Mile Island Score Posh alien discos Start Quiz The faster you answer, the higher you score! Challenge your friends and sign up for your chance to win a free digital subscription to Science. The Indian Council of Medical Research this month derailed a controversial experiment that would attempt to do this: A milk-rich diet Colliding neutron stars. Fast radio bursts (FRBs) occur without warning, so seeing one is an extremely rare event. That’s why astronomers in Australia were so excited when they witnessed the brightest flash ever recorded. Because it was so bright, the scientists could observe how the signal was altered by the intergalactic medium through which it traveled, much as starlight’s passage through Earth’s atmosphere makes stars twinkle. Based on how the signal dispersed and distorted, the team confirmed that the signal had been traveling for at least a billion years—meaning its source was at least a billion light-years away. Photosynthesis ESO/José Francisco Salgado (josefrancisco.org) November 21, 2016 The Science Quiz Take the quiz to enter for a chance to win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Learn More Colliding neutron stars Scientists have significantly increased crop yield by tweaking what? Broke up Pangea Chernobyl 0 / 10 A shift in ocean chemistry. Animals with skeletons did not exist before about 550 million years ago. Then, scientists have proposed, atmospheric oxygen levels rose and the chemistry of the oceans changed in such a way that animals could harness the minerals required to build hard structural parts. A new analysis of ancient rock layers in Siberia provides support for this idea, showing that the oceans became rich in skeletal building blocks around the same time the first fossils of animals with skeletons start to appear. A new study has found that some taxi drivers consistently avoid certain passengers for this reason: Bird poop Black holes Air conditioners Mars Share your scorelast_img read more


Massive fish dieoff sparks outcry in Australia

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Massive fish die-off sparks outcry in Australia This wasn’t supposed to happen. In 2012, the national government adopted the Murray-Darling Basin Plan, touted as a “historic” deal to ensure that enough water remained in the rivers to keep the ecosystem healthy even after farmers and households took their share. But, “The plan didn’t take enough water back for the environment, and then we didn’t use it well,” says John Williams, an ANU hydrologist.The 1-million-square-kilometer Murray-Darling Basin accounts for 40% of Australia’s agricultural output, thanks in part to heavy irrigation. By the early 2000s, water flows in the lower reaches of the basin were just a third of historical levels, according to a 2008 study. During the millennium drought, which started in the late 1990s and lasted for a decade, downstream communities faced water shortages.In 2008, the federal government created the Murray-Darling Basin Authority to wrestle with the problem. In 2010, a study commissioned by the authority concluded that farmers and consumers would have to cut their use of river water by at least 3000 but preferably by 7600 gigaliters annually to ensure the health of the ecosystem. Farmers, who saw their livelihoods threatened, tossed the report into bonfires.The final plan, adopted as national law in 2012, called for returning just 2750 gigaliters to the rivers, in part by buying water rights back from users. “It was a political compromise that has never been scientifically reviewed,” Williams says, adding that “climate change was never considered in the plan, which was a dreadful oversight.”Implementation has exacerbated the problems. Since 2012, the federal government has spent AU$6 billion on the plan, but two-thirds has gone to improving irrigation infrastructure, on the premise that efficiency would ease demands on the rivers. Critics say the money would have been better spent on purchasing water rights.Grafton says there are also suspicions of widespread water theft; up to 75% of the water taken by irrigators in the northern part of the system is not metered. Farmers are also now recapturing the runoff from irrigated fields that used to flow back into streams, and are increasing their use of ground water, leaving even less water in the system, says Mike Young, an environmental policy specialist at the University of Adelaide in Australia.In February 2018, such issues prompted a group of 12 academics, including scientists and policy experts, to issue the Murray-Darling Declaration. It called for independent economic and scientific audits of completed and planned water recovery schemes to determine their effects on stream flows. The group, which included Williams and Grafton, also urged the creation of an independent, expert body to provide advice on basin water management. Young, who wasn’t on the declaration, wants to go further and give that body the power to manage the basin’s water, the way central banks manage a country’s money supply, using stream levels to determine weekly irrigation allocations and to set minimum flow levels for every river.Before the fish kill, such proposals had garnered little attention. But Young hopes the public outrage will influence federal elections that have to take place by mid-May. The major parties “have to be seen to be committed to expedite improvements to the basin plan,” Young says. The big question then is “whether or not they carry through.” Australians knew another long drought was hammering the country’s southeast. But it took a viral Facebook video posted on 8 January to drive home the ecological catastrophe that was unfolding in the Murray-Darling river system. In the footage, Rob McBride and Dick Arnold, identified as local residents, stand knee-deep among floating fish carcasses in the Darling River, near the town of Menindee. They scoff at authorities’ claims that the fish die-off is a result of the drought. Holding up an enormous, dead Murray cod, a freshwater predator he says is 100 years old, McBride says: “This has nothing to do with drought, this is a manmade disaster.” Arnold, sputtering with rage, adds: “You have to be bloody disgusted with yourselves, you politicians and cotton growers.”Scientists say McBride probably overestimated the age of the fish. But they agree that the massive die-off was not the result of drought. “It’s about taking too much water upstream [to irrigate farms] so there is not enough for downstream users and the fish,” says Quentin Grafton, an economist specializing in water issues at Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. The Australia Institute, a Canberra-based think tank, blamed “policy failure and mismanagement” in a 19 January report, but called drought a catalyst.Excessive water use has left river flows too low to flush nutrients from farm runoff through the system, leading to large algal blooms, researchers say. A cold snap then killed the blooms, and bacteria feeding on the dead algae sucked oxygen out of the water, suffocating between 100,000 and 1 million fish. The death of so many individuals that had survived previous droughts is “unprecedented,” says ANU ecologist Matthew Colloff. And with fish of breeding age decimated, recovery will be slow. “But only a bloody fool would put a time frame on that,” Colloff says. By Dennis NormileJan. 22, 2019 , 5:30 PMcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A viral video drew attention to water woes in the Murray-Darling Basin. Rob McBride/Tolarno Station last_img read more


Artificial intelligence helps predict volcanic eruptions

first_img Lucas Bustamante/Minden Pictures By Paul VoosenDec. 11, 2018 , 4:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country New algorithms processing satellite data automatically caught the ground motion before the eruption of Wolf Volcano in the Galápagos Islands. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Satellites are providing torrents of data about the world’s active volcanoes, but researchers have struggled to turn them into a global prediction of volcanic risks. That may soon change with newly developed algorithms that can automatically tease from that data signals of volcanic risk, raising the prospect that within a couple years scientists could develop a global volcano warning system.Without such tools, geoscientists simply can’t keep up with information pouring out the satellites, says Michael Poland, the scientist-in-charge of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Yellowstone Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington, who was not involved in either study. “The volume of data is overwhelming,” he says.Andrew Hooper, a volcanologist at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom who led the development of one method, says the new algorithms should benefit the roughly 800 million people who live near volcanoes. “About 1400 volcanoes have potential to erupt above the sea,” he says. “About 100 are monitored. The vast majority aren’t.” Both methods were presented this week in Washington, D.C., at the semiannual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Artificial intelligence helps predict volcanic eruptions Over the past few years, with the launch of the European Space Agency’s satellites Sentinel 1A and Sentinel 1B, the field of volcanology has received frequent, repeated views of how the ground shifts around the world’s volcanoes. The Sentinel 1 satellites use a technique called radar interferometry, which compares radar signals sent to and reflected from Earth to track changes in the planet’s surface. The method isn’t new, but, uniquely, the Sentinel 1 satellites revisit each spot on the planet once every 6 days, and the Sentinel team releases those high-resolution observations rapidly. A research group in the United Kingdom called the Centre for Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics (COMET) had already begun to create a database of these ground-movement snapshots, called interferograms, for the world’s volcanoes. Overlaying this database with automated detection seemed natural given the success machine learning has had in other forms of pattern detection, says Hooper, who works with COMET.Changes in ground motion typically reflect magma shifting beneath the volcano and do not perfectly predict eruptions. But unlike thermal hot spots or ash plumes, which can be automatically detected with weather satellites, land shifts can help predict eruptions, not simply indicate their occurrence. “Deformation doesn’t always mean eruption,” Hooper says. “But there are few cases where we don’t have an eruption without deformation.”First, the teams had to teach their algorithms not to confuse atmospheric shifts for ground motion, something interferograms are prone to do. To do that, Hooper’s team settled on a technique called independent component analysis, which learns to break apart a signal into different pieces: such as stratified atmosphere or short-term turbulence, along with ground shifts in a volcano’s caldera or flank. The technique allows them to catch both brand-new ground motions, or changes in rate, both of which can be signs of pending eruption.Meanwhile, another COMET team led by Juliet Biggs, a volcanologist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, has built a second algorithm using a increasingly popular form of artificial intelligence called convolutional neural networks, which use layers of biologically inspired “neurons” to break apart features of images into ever-more-abstract pools, learning how to tell, for example, cats from dogs. The researchers first trained their neural network using raw interferograms from Envisat, Sentinel’s precursor, for which they had existing examples of eruptions. Although the algorithm had some success on an analysis of 30,000 Sentinel interferograms, it still produced too many false positives. There were simply too few examples to learn from, says Fabien Albino, a volcanologist who works with Biggs at Bristol. “For machine learning, 100 is nothing. They want thousands and thousands.”To overcome that problem, Biggs and her colleagues create a synthetic data set of computer-simulated eruptions, generated for a few known physical patterns. These synthetic data dropped the fraction of false positives from some 60% to 20%, as they reported today at the AGU meeting. That trend will only continue to get better as more Sentinel examples are poured into the algorithm, Albino says. “The system is just going to tune like Google, [inputting] millions of cats and dogs, and afterward the system knows. It doesn’t have to learn anymore. It’s stable.”Although some continued technical hiccups on COMET’s volcano database have prevented the teams from running their algorithms close to real time on all volcanoes, Hooper has run their technique on select spots, including the volcanic peaks known as Sierra Negra and Wolf on the Galápagos Islands. Both erupted this past year, and Hooper’s program caught both as their unrest started, he reported yesterday at the meeting.The two algorithms are complementary; the neural network, for example, cannot catch very slow changes in deformation, but the independent component analysis can. So it’s likely that COMET’s warning system will use both, Hooper says. For now, the challenge is speeding up how quickly COMET can pull the radar data from Sentinel into its database. Although these data are available from Sentinel within a few hours, it still takes several weeks for them to fully transfer. It’s painstaking work, Hooper says. “We thought we’d be further along.”Still, the work looks exactly what the world needs, Poland says. “It’s an impressive first step,” he says. “It could absolutely revolutionize detecting these events.”last_img read more


After botched launch orbiting atomic clocks confirm Einsteins theory of relativity

first_img By Adrian ChoDec. 7, 2018 , 3:10 PM After botched launch, orbiting atomic clocks confirm Einstein’s theory of relativity ESA center_img Making lemonade from lemons, two teams of physicists have used data from misguided satellites to put Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity, the general theory of relativity, to an unexpected test. The opportunistic experiment confirms to unprecedented precision a key prediction of the theory—that time ticks slower near a massive body like Earth than it does farther away.As Einstein explained, gravity arises because massive bodies warp space-time. Free-falling objects follow the straightest possible paths in that curved space-time, which to us appear as the parabolic arc of a thrown ball or the circular or elliptical orbit of a satellite. As part of that warping, time should tick more slowly near a massive body than it does farther away. That bizarre effect was first confirmed to low precision in 1959 in an experiment on Earth and in 1976 by Gravity Probe A, a 2-hour rocket-born experiment that compared the ticking of an atomic clock on the rocket with another on the ground.In 2014, scientists got another chance to test the effect when two of the 26 satellites now in Europe’s Galileo global navigation system, like the one pictured above, were accidentally launched into elliptical orbits instead of circular ones. The satellites now rise and fall by 8500 kilometers on every 13-hour orbit, which should cause their ticking to speed up and slow down by about one part in 10 billion over the course of each orbit. Now, two teams of physicists have tracked the variations and have shown, to five times better precision than before, that they match the predictions of general relativity, they report 4 December in Physical Review Letters. That’s not bad, considering the satellites weren’t designed to do the experiment. However, another experiment set to be launched to the space station in 2020 aims to search for similar deviations with five times greater precision still.last_img read more


Fishing fleets have doubled since 1950—but theyre having a harder time catching

first_img Email Fishing fleets have doubled since 1950—but they’re having a harder time catching fish The number of boats harvesting seafood has increased significantly since the middle of the previous century, a new global analysis finds, and is much higher than some scientists assumed. Meanwhile, ships’ motors are getting larger, expanding their range and ability to bring more fish to port. But as competition increases, fish stocks are being taxed and it is taking more effort to find fish, the researchers warn. The trend is likely to continue, they say, and highlights the need to improve fisheries management in many places.“The new study is a big step forward” in understanding the nature of global fishing, says fisheries biologist Ray Hilborn of the University of Washington in Seattle who was not involved with the work.Previous studies of global fishing fleets have typically relied on intergovernmental agencies, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, which don’t have complete records. For the new work, Yannick Rousseau—a graduate student in the lab of Reg Watson, a fisheries ecologist at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia—gathered additional data from about 100 countries, examining local reports, national registries, and scientific papers. Rousseau was able to analyze trends for three groups of vessels: both motorized and unmotorized small-scale fishing boats, often called artisanal, and industrial fishing boats, which are typically longer than 12 meters and can go farther offshore. By Erik StokstadMay. 27, 2019 , 3:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe dbimages/Alamy Stock Photo The number of ships more than doubled to 3.7 million between 1950 and 2015, the team reports this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; in Asia, the number quadrupled. Another important trend is the spread of motors. In the 1950s, only about 20% of fishing vessels around the world had motors; by 2015, 68% did, most with power under 50 kilowatts—a small engine, or outboard motor, for example.Tabulating all these figures, Rousseau and his co-authors found that the combined engine power of small vessels equals that of the industrial fleet. “It was a very counterintuitive result,” Rousseau says, given the public and political attention attracted by large fishing vessels.Still, just because a fleet of small boats boasts as much engine power as large trawlers “doesn’t mean it will have the same impacts,” cautions Ratana Chuenpagdee, a policy expert at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John’s, Canada, who studies small-scale fisheries. The type of fishing gear influences ecological health, she notes, and politics can play a strong role, too. When a community has control over the resource, a fleet of local boats may have more incentive to conserve the fish stocks than a large ship from overseas.The huge engines used today in industrial fisheries allow boats to go much faster and farther, spend more time catching fish in distant waters, and store them in freezers. “The killing power of these vessels goes up,” Watson says. “It really ups the game.”But compared with ships in the 1950s, today’s global fleet catches only 20% as much fish for the same amount of effort. This metric—called catch per unit effort, sometimes measured by days at sea—is a key indicator of fish population size and responsible management, which limits the number of fishing vessels or stops them from overfishing. These actions have stabilized fish stocks in the past 2 decades in North America, Western Europe, and Australia, where government regulators have tightened the rules and subsidies have made it more attractive to retire ships. Not so in Southeast Asia, the Mediterranean, and Latin America.The situation could get worse. At current rates, the researchers expect a million more fishing vessels to become motorized by 2050, and engine power will increase on others. Fleets of larger vessels will continue to move into territorial waters of other countries and also into the high seas. These trends will make it harder to sustainably exploit fish stocks, Watson says. “We haven’t reached the peak of intensive fishing.”Many developing nations will need help to improve their fisheries management, Watson says, as well as better information on fish stocks. The new data on vessels could help. In places where biologists have not assessed the size of fish populations, they could use information about the fleets to estimate the pressure on local stocks.Fisheries scientists and marine ecologists will also be interested in the new data to better understand the global picture, Hilborn says. “It will be the basis of a lot of further work.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more


Sri Lanka to revive suspended visa on arrival programme to 39 countries

first_img Sri Lankan soldier arrested for attack on newspaper editor 10 years ago Related News Advertising By PTI |Sri Lanka | Published: July 10, 2019 3:47:52 pm Advertising Where India stands in battle against measles, how Sri Lanka eliminated it Sri Lanka on alert as Buddhist hardliners hold first meeting after Easter attacks The minister emphasised that a monitoring system would be put in place to prevent “undesirable people” entering the country. “We need a system to monitor who is arriving in Sri Lanka and to prevent criminals and other troublemakers entering the country,” he stressed.The countries that will be included in the visa on arrival programme include Austria, the UK, the US, Japan, Australia and Canada, the report said.The island nation received 7,40,600 foreign tourists in the first three months of 2019. Around 450,000 Indians visited Sri Lanka last year and the island nation was expecting the total Indian tourist arrivals to cross one million mark in 2019. Tourism revenues in Lanka increased to USD 362.7 million in November from USD 284 million in October 2018, according to reports Sri Lanka had on April 25 suspended its plans to grant visas on arrival to citizens of 39 countries after the devastating suicide bombings on April 21 that killed 258 people. The visa on arrival pilot programme was part of a larger initiative to increase tourist arrivals to the country during the six month off-season period from May to October.Tourism Development Minister John Amaratunga on Tuesday said that his ministry along with the Department of Immigration and Emigration are jointly working on a proposal to seek Cabinet approval to revive the free visa and visa on arrival programme, the Daily Mirror reported.He noted that the programme will be implemented as a trial for period of six months excluding the country’s top source markets of India and China. However, he said that the programme could be extended to these two counties as well in the future based on the success of the trial run. Sri Lanka to revive suspended visa on arrival programme to 39 countries excluding India Sri Lanka had on April 25 suspended its plans to grant visas on arrival to citizens of 39 countries after the devastating suicide bombings on April 21 that killed 258 people. (File/Adam Dean/The New York Times)The Sri Lankan government plans to revive the visa on arrival and free visa programme, which was suspended following the Easter Sunday blasts, for citizens of 39 countries, excluding India and China, from August 1, according to a media report. Post Comment(s)last_img read more


Immunotherapy medicine found to be effective in treating uveitis

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 19 2018A team of researchers from the UCH CEU’s Biomedical Sciences Institute has tested the efficiency of Bevacizumab, medicine used against cancer and in ophtalmology, to treat uveítis, thus stopping the inflammation from spreading.Uveitis is an inflammation of the uvula – the ocular tissue located between the sclera and the retina -, due to infections or autoimmune diseases. The uvula provides a majority of the blood supply to the retina, so early treatment of its inflammation could be key to prevent consequences in other ocular tissues, because, if it is not treated on time, the inflammation can spread to the vitreous and the retina. Researchers of the Biomedicine Sciences Institute of the Universidad Cardenal Herrera CEU university (UCH CEU) in Valencia have tested for the first time on an experimental model the efficiency of Bevacizumab in treating uveitis. The results, which provide a new strategy for treating uveitis and preventing its effects, have been published in the international scientific journal Frontiers in Pharmacology.Related StoriesChaos in the house and asthma in children – the connectionNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedStudy shows potential culprit behind LupusAccording to professor Francisco Bosch, head of the UCH CEU’s Biomedical Sciences Institute, “Bevacizumab is a medicine used in combined immunotherapy for treating tumours, which also has several ophthalmologic uses for treating ocular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, macular oedema or glaucoma.” The research team of the UCH CEU, headed by doctor Bosch, has studied the medicine’s anti-inflammatory capacity for the first time, compared to its potential risks regarding toxicity, in induced uveitis on an experimental model.Anti-inflammatory effectAs professor Bosch highlights, “the cellular and histopathological count results obtained by our team proves the capabilities of the medicine to prevent inflammation, not only of the uvula, but also the retina and the vitreous chamber. And it also makes it possible to rule out the risk of retinal degradation that could be associated to the use of the medicine.”These results also provide relevant data regarding the controversy surrounding the use of injectable medicines with vascular endothelium anti-growth factor, the anti-VEGF. “Even though bevacizumab, commercialized as Avastin, was initially developed to treat several types of cancer, it is commonly used in ophthalmology despite this use not being recommended. Our results verify that in this field it is as effective and safe as other anti-VEGF medicines such as Lucentis, which was designed specifically for ophthalmologic purposes, but is more expensive,” stresses doctor Bosch.Source: http://ruvid.org/ri-world/immunotherapy-medicine-proves-effective-against-ocular-inflammation/last_img read more


Researchers develop promising targeted strategy to treat chemoresistant blood cancer

first_img Source:http://www.ohri.ca/newsroom/story/view/1054?l=en Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 22 2018Researchers from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have developed a promising targeted strategy to treat chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and a diagnostic test to determine which AML patients would most likely benefit from this treatment. In a mouse model, the experimental treatment eliminated all signs of disease (complete remission) in 100 percent of animals, while those that received the standard treatment all died. The results are published in the leading cancer journal Cancer Discovery.”We were blown away when we saw the results,” said senior author Dr. William Stanford, a senior scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and professor at the University of Ottawa. “If these findings hold up in clinical trials, we could have a new treatment for people who would almost certainly die of their disease today.”AML is the most common type of leukemia in adults, killing more than 10,000 people each year in Canada and the U.S. It starts in blood stem cells found in the bone marrow. Chemotherapy has been the first-line treatment for more than 40 years. However, about a third of people do not respond initially, and another 40 to 50 percent relapse (their cancer comes back) after an initial response. Most of these people eventually die of their disease.Dr. Stanford’s research focuses on a protein called MTF2, which places chemical tags near certain genes to help control their expression (called epigenetics). Dr. Stanford previously found that MTF2 plays a role in blood development. He then teamed up with Dr. Mitchell Sabloff, a hematologist at The Ottawa Hospital, to see if it also plays a role in blood cancer.Using AML samples from patients treated at The Ottawa Hospital, the team found that people with normal MTF2 activity were three times more likely to be alive five years after their initial chemotherapy treatment than people with low MTF2 activity.”Initially we thought that MTF2 could be an important biomarker to identify patients who might benefit from experimental therapies,” said Dr. Stanford. “But then we started thinking that if we could understand what MTF2 was doing, maybe we could use this information to develop a new treatment.”Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryDr. Stanford and his colleagues then discovered that MTF2 helps to place a chemical tag near a gene called MDM2, which is known to help cells resist chemotherapy. In AML cells with normal MTF2, this tag lowers MDM2 levels and ensures that cells die when they are damaged by chemotherapy. On the other hand, AML cells with low MTF2 can’t put tags on MDM2 to decrease its expression. These cells keep on living and dividing even when exposed to high levels of chemotherapy.Since drugs that block or inhibit MDM2 are already being tested in clinical trials for other types of cancer, the team tested these in mouse models of AML using cells derived from patients whose cancer was resistant to chemotherapy. Mice treated with the MDM2 inhibitors plus chemotherapy all survived until the experiment ended four months later, and had no evidence of cancer, while those treated with chemotherapy alone all died.”The preclinical animal data is very encouraging,” said Dr. Caryn Ito, a senior investigator at The Ottawa Hospital who developed the mouse models and co-led the study. “Our dedicated team of basic and clinical researchers worked extremely hard on this project. We were totally surprised by the findings, which we hope to translate to the clinic soon.”The researchers are now trying to obtain pharmaceutical-grade MDM2 inhibitors to conduct trials in people with AML at The Ottawa Hospital. They are also screening libraries of approved drugs to see if any of these can block MDM2. And they are working with a biotech company to develop a test to identify chemotherapy-resistant AML patients, who would respond to these kinds of drugs. They have also filed a patent related to their discovery.”We still have a lot of research to do, but if this works it could make a difference for patients around the world,” said Dr. Sabloff, who is also an associate professor at the University of Ottawa, Director of The Ottawa Hospital’s Leukemia Program and the Co-Director of the hematology bio-bank at the hospital. “I want to thank the many patients at The Ottawa Hospital who have and continue to generously donate blood and bone marrow for this research.”last_img read more


Onequarter of patients with diabetes report using less insulin due to high

first_img Source:https://news.yale.edu/2018/12/03/one-four-patients-say-theyve-skimped-insulin-because-high-cost Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 3 2018For patients with diabetes, insulin is a life-saving medicine and an essential component of diabetes management, yet in the past decade alone, the out-of-pocket costs for insulin have doubled in the United States. One-quarter of patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes have reported using less insulin than prescribed due to these high costs, Yale researchers write in JAMA Internal Medicine, and over a third of those patients experiencing cost-related underuse said they never discussed this reality with their provider.”You might have heard stories of patients rationing their insulin,” said Yale endocrinologist and senior author Dr. Kasia Lipska. “The stories are really powerful, but they don’t tell us how common this problem has become. Our findings show that these are not isolated incidents and that skimping on insulin is frighteningly common. As clinicians, we have to advocate for change because the status quo is simply cruel and not acceptable.”Related StoriesNo lasting improvement in insulin secretion with diabetic medicationResearch on increasing insulin’s shelf life may have significant implications for health careDiscovery could change the way fibromyalgia and chronic pain are treatedResearchers surveyed a diverse sample of patients from across New Haven County, Connecticut, who use the Yale Diabetes Center for treatment. They asked patients about many different types of cost-related insulin underuse: using less insulin than prescribed, trying to stretch out one’s prescribed insulin, taking smaller doses of insulin than prescribed, stopping the use of insulin, not filling an insulin prescription, and/or not starting insulin. One in four respondents indicated they’d done at least one of those underuse behaviors in the past year due to insulin’s out-of-pocket cost.”The data we collected speak loud and clear to the fact that cost is a huge barrier to insulin accessibility,” said Pavithra Vijayakumar, co-first author and Yale medical student. “I hope this spurs more action to help patients afford this life-sustaining medication.”The survey found that the quarter of patients who’d indicated they engaged in any type of insulin underuse were much more likely (43% versus 28%) to have poor glycemic control, an important indicator of the effectiveness of diabetes management. Additionally, they found that lower-income patients were more likely to report cost-related underuse, and nearly two-thirds of those patients reported that they also experienced difficulty affording other diabetes management equipment.”It was really eye-opening to hear patients’ stories as they turned in completed surveys,” said Darby Herkert, co-first author of the study and Yale undergraduate. “I’ve worked in various global health settings, but this brought home to me how much patients struggle with costs right here in New Haven.”last_img read more


Ideas to curb surprise medical bills percolate with rare bipartisan push

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 5 2019Surrounded by patients who told horror stories of being stuck with hefty bills, President Donald Trump recently waded into a widespread health care problem for which almost everyone — even those with insurance — is at risk: surprise medical billing.Trump’s declaration that taming unexpected bills would be a top priority for his administration echoed through the halls of Congress, where a handful of Republican and Democratic lawmakers have been studying the problem the past couple of years.The sudden presidential interest has lawmakers on both sides of the aisle expressing optimism about attacking a problem that has affected 57 percent of American adults, according to a University of Chicago survey conducted last summer. Sen. Lamar Alexander, the Tennessee Republican who chairs the influential Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, recently told reporters that he expects to see surprise billing legislation “in the next several months.”Alexander is encouraged by the movement on both sides of the aisle, said a committee spokesman — giving a particular nod to the efforts of Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.). “The chairman looks forward to reviewing their work and hopes it leads to a bipartisan consensus on how to address the issue,” the spokesman added.”Indications in Congress have always been that this would be something they could do on a bipartisan basis,” said Paul Ginsburg, a health economist at the Brookings Institution, a D.C.-based think tank.Attention to this practice, which involves charging patients for care that is more expensive than anticipated or not covered by their insurance, has grown following an ongoing Kaiser Health News-NPR “Bill of the Month” investigation into medical billing at large.While appetite for policymaking is on the upswing, the details of a possible solution remain up in the air.The Trump administration has not laid out precisely how it would take on surprise bills. But key lawmakers, including Alexander and Cassidy, have met with administration officials to discuss how to reduce health care costs.With an eye toward drafting legislation, these two senators and several others have been consulting with billing experts, as well as state and local officials, about the biggest challenges and most promising approaches being used around the country.And, though Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has yet to address the issue, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said it would be a priority.”Ending surprise billing is an important part of Democrats’ ongoing effort to lower out-of-pocket health costs, and we’ll be working on it in the coming Congress,” said Henry Connelly, a Pelosi spokesman.Previously introduced bills would impose new notification requirements, as well as limitations on what doctors and hospitals might charge patients. They would regulate bills for either emergency care at an out-of-network facility, or non-emergency care when the facility is in-network but the doctor is not. A draft bill pushed by Cassidy — a gastroenterologist by trade and the leader of a small, bipartisan group of senators studying the issue — would cap what patients pay, and prohibit balance billing, when a patient is expected to make up the difference between what the provider charged and what the insurer paid. Instead of arbitration, the state would set the amount a health plan must pay. In the absence of a local policy, health plans would default to a federal formula outlined in the bill. (This is similar to laws passed in California and Connecticut.) A bill from Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.) would tackle the issue by preventing a hospital, physician group or other medical provider from charging patients more for an emergency procedure than they would have expected to pay for in-network care. It would then establish an arbitration process to determine what the patient’s health plan should pay. (This is similar to laws passed in New York and New Jersey.) A bill from Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-Texas), the chairman of the House Ways and Means’ health subcommittee, introduced during the last Congress with Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), would require hospitals to notify patients whether they, and the doctors and other providers the patient would see there, are in-network, as well as how much patients could expect to pay out-of-pocket. Without at least 24 hours’ notice and the patient’s consent — or if the patient was receiving same-day, emergency treatment — the hospital would be able to charge the patient no more than an in-network provider would. Related StoriesGender biases are extremely common among health care professionalsFeeling safe and good sleep at night matter most to sick kids in hospitalBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryTo draw attention to the issue, Hassan planned to bring a guest to Tuesday’s State of the Union address who was billed more than $1,600 for a trip to an in-network emergency room. The patient learned after the fact that the doctor she briefly saw there was out-of-network.”There does seem to be across-the-board understanding that what’s happening to patients right now isn’t right or fair,” Hassan told KHN.Other members of Congress, including Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), will bring guests with painful, personal stories regarding the high cost of prescription drugs.For its part, the administration says its commitment to addressing surprise medical bills is firm.”President Trump has identified surprise medical bills as a serious concern of the administration. Protecting patients from these outrageous and unexpected bills and charges is a top priority for Secretary [Alex] Azar,” said Caitlin Oakley, a Department of Health and Human Services spokeswoman.Hassan said she has not heard anything from the White House. But as Congress shifts its focus away from the partial government shutdown, she predicted, surprise billing could emerge as a legislative priority, adding that she and Cassidy have coordinated on the issue.Both Hassan’s and Cassidy’s bills “would go a long way toward protecting patients,” suggested Zack Cooper, a Yale health economist who researches surprise billing. Hassan’s legislation, he said, has the additional benefit of likely bringing down health care costs.”There are a lot of issues that can’t be fixed or at least can’t be fixed easily. This is an issue that causes immense pain and is quite visceral and can be fixed,” Cooper said.And federal legislation is likely necessary, experts say. Some states have passed laws meant to curb surprise billing, and to protect patients from the costs — but those laws don’t affect self-insured large employers, which fall under federal jurisdiction and affect more than 60 percent of people who get insurance through work.The presidential bully pulpit could be hugely influential — in particular, Ginsburg suggested, by “leaning on Congress” to bring legislation to Trump’s desk.And new legislation probably is the most effective vehicle, health policy experts said. It’s unclear whether or what kind of executive action HHS could take without Congress.”Some creative lawyers could come up with creative interpretations [of existing laws] and lead to smart policy,” said Barak Richman, a Duke University law school professor who focuses on health policy.But re-interpreting federal law would almost certainly invite legal challenges, he added.Already, competing industry groups are lobbying to put their stamp on any federal policy. The emergency physicians’ trade group has backed an approach like Hassan’s, while the insurance lobby is calling for a Cassidy-style bill. When asked about the industry’s response, Hassan said she has gotten “a variety of feedback — as you would expect.”center_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more


Pregnant women face greater risk of having hemorrhagic stroke reveal studies

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 8 2019Pregnant women face a much greater risk of having a fatal, but less common, type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain, according to results of two studies presented by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) at the International Stroke Conference 2019.A study led by senior author Farhaan Vahidy, PhD, MBBS, MPH, found that pregnant women and those who recently gave birth were three to 10 times more likely to suffer intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which occurs when a blood vessel inside the brain bursts and spills blood into or around the brain. Vahidy is an associate professor of neurology at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth and director of the Population Health & Health Services Research Division at UTHealth Institute for Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease.”It’s important to remember that stroke is uncommon among the younger female population. Women undergo a number of physiological changes while pregnant, so we hypothesized that pregnancy would confer a higher ICH risk,” said first author and presenter Jennifer Meeks, MS, a research coordinator in the Department of Neurology at McGovern Medical School. “However, the scale of the increase was highly significant and strikingly greater than what was anticipated.”Women with a history of other medical conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes were found to be at a greater risk of ICH. Those who had preeclampsia or eclampsia were 10 times more likely to suffer ICH, according to the study.Using publicly available administrative data, researchers analyzed more than 3.3 million deliveries among women in hospitals in New York, California, and Florida. The same women, age 28 on average, were followed and served as their own controls when no longer pregnant or postpartum.”The results showed that the risk of ICH starts to increase during the third trimester and continues to rise into an extended postpartum period. Other attributes, such as race, also appeared to influence the likelihood. For instance, black women were twice as likely as white women to suffer ICH and Asian women were 1.68 times more likely,” Meeks said. “Further research is required to more precisely predict those groups of women who are at an increased risk of ICH during pregnancy so preventive measures may be taken.”Related StoriesNew method improves detection of atrial fibrillation in stroke survivorsNew approach to post-stroke rehabilitation proposedNew promising approach repairs system of blood vessels following strokeThere are two types of stroke, hemorrhagic and ischemic, which occurs when a blood vessel carrying blood to the brain is blocked by a clot. Around 15 percent of all strokes are hemorrhagic, but they account for approximately 40 percent of all stroke deaths, according to the National Stroke Association.In the second study, researchers found women with arteriovenous malformation (AVM), an abnormal tangle of blood vessels in the brain, had increased incidence of ICH from AVM rupture during pregnancy.Results showed women with AVMs were almost 3½ times more likely to have ICH associated with pregnancy and delivery.”Researchers have suspected that brain AVMs are more likely to bleed with pregnancy, but because they are uncommon, this connection was hard to prove. In our study, we looked at millions of women; the data confirmed this and were very compelling,” said Sunil Sheth, MD, the senior author, who is an assistant professor of vascular and interventional neurology at McGovern Medical School.The study analyzed data from nearly 6.3 million women, age 28 on average, with first-time pregnancy in hospitals in New York and Florida. Of these patients, 1,024 (0.02 percent) had an AVM, which was linked to a 340 percent increased risk of ICH during the pregnancy period.”An AVM is like having a little bomb in the head, which creates an explosion of blood in the brain if it ruptures. When this happens it can put the mother and baby in considerable danger,” Sheth said.The abstract called for further research and improved methods to reduce ICH risk.”We need to understand exactly what is happening – why do AVMs bleed in the first place and what is causing this substantially higher risk among pregnant women who have them?” Sheth said. “These findings could change the conversation of care for a very particular patient group. If we know a woman with a brain AVM is planning a pregnancy, it may be appropriate to treat the AVM before pregnancy or counsel for close monitoring during pregnancy.”Source: https://www.uth.edu/news/story.htm?id=5d2d8b9a-d1b4-4dc9-86fc-344378006898last_img read more


Appbased ridehailing services linked to more congestion and traffic deaths

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 9 2019While the era of app-based ridehailing services, such as Uber and Lyft, has been credited with keeping more impaired drivers off the road, increasing job opportunities and offering new levels of convenience, it is also linked with more congestion and traffic deaths.The arrival of ridehailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.The researchers used the staggered roll-out dates from Uber and Lyft to review the eight quarters before and after ridehailing adoption in large U.S. cities from 2001 to 2016- analyzing traffic volume, transportation choices and accidents to arrive at their conclusion.The documented increase in accidents appears to persist and even increase over time, and that rate has stayed steady through weekdays, weeknights, weekend days and weekend nights, according to John Barrios, assistant professor at Chicago Booth, and Yale V. Hochberg and Hanyi Yi, both of Rice University, in the working paper, The Cost of Convenience: Ridehailing and Traffic Fatalities.For perspective, while in 2010 the number of roadway deaths in the U.S. stood at 32,885 (the lowest level since 1949), that number increased to more than 37,400 in 2016. The authors find that the introduction of ridehailing services in 2011 accounts for roughly 3 percent annual increase in auto deaths nationwide, or 987 people each year.Economic theory and the data point to many reasons for ridehailing’s contribution to the growth in traffic fatalities. Ridehailing has put more cars on the road, and that has meant more accidents, injuries, and deaths involving drivers, passengers, bikers, and pedestrians, the study says.Related StoriesComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyThe most significant increase in accidents occurred in larger cities, which saw a rise in new-car registrations when ridehailing was available, despite having public-transportation systems. Meanwhile, in cities that have introduced ridehailing, bike and pedestrian fatalities from accidents involving cars have increased at a similar rate to all driving fatalities.”Surveys report that fewer than half of [ridehailing] rides in nine major metro areas actually substitute for a trip that someone would have made in a car,” the study says.Also, Uber and Lyft need to keep large numbers of cars on the roads so they can get to riders quickly. Thus, the companies subsidize drivers to stay on the road between fares. As a result, ridehailing drivers are often driving alone as they search for riders, resulting in more cars on the road than usual at any given time.Finally, the researchers quantify the financial costs of the additional fatalities. Based on U.S. Department of Transportation estimates for the value of a statistical life, they found fatalities due to ridehailing amount to about $10 billion. That figure does not include costs from non-fatal accidents.While the authors note that ridehailing benefits are undeniable, such as providing safe and affordable transportation options, more carpooling for riders, and job opportunities for drivers, they emphasize that, “still, the annual cost in human lives is nontrivial.” Instead, they view the essential contribution of their study as “pointing to the need for further research and debate about the overall cost-benefit tradeoff of ridehailing.” Source:University of Chicago Booth School of Businesslast_img read more


German startup AUTO1 gets 558 million Softbank investment

© 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Japan’s Softbank is investing 460 million euros ($558 million) in German used car trading platform AUTO1. Explore further Japan’s SoftBank Group soars on listing reports Citation: German startup AUTO1 gets $558 million Softbank investment (2018, January 15) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-german-startup-auto1-million-softbank.html The Berlin-based company was launched in 2012 and operates in over 30 countries, selling more than 40,000 cars a month on its associated sites.AUTO1 said in a statement Monday that the investment from Softbank Vision Fund values its business at 2.9 billion euros. The company had revenue of 1.5 billion euros last year.Akshay Naheta, a partner at SoftBank Investment Advisors, was quoted as saying that AUTO1’s platform adds “efficiency and transparency to the fragmented used car market, which is worth more than $300 billion annually.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more


Researchers use simulations to study brain damage from bomb blasts and materials

Journal information: Journal of the American Ceramic Society Ashfaq Adnan, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), and his postdoctoral associate Yuan Ting Wu published research findings in Scientific Reports in July 2017 revealing how battlefield blasts may cause bubbles in the brain’s perineuronal nets which, in turn, may collapse and damage neurons.”This study reveals that if a blast-like event affects the brain under certain circumstances, the mechanical forces could damage the perineuronal net located adjacent to the neurons, which could lead to damage of the neurons themselves,” Adnan said. “It is important to prove this concept so that future research may address how to prevent cavitation damage and better protect our soldiers,”Cavitation is the development of bubbles, much like those that form around a ship’s spinning propellers. Existing scans cannot detect whether cavitation bubbles form inside the brain due to blasts or how these blasts affect a person’s individual neurons, the brain cells responsible for processing and transmitting information.Adnan’s research used supercomputer-powered molecular dynamics simulations to study structural damage in the perineuronal nets (PNN) area in the brain. He then determined the point at which mechanical forces may damage the PNN or injure the neurons.The research was supported by a grant through the Office of Naval Research’s Warfighter Performance Department and UTA.MODELING THE EFFECTS OF BOMB BLASTSUnderstanding the details of the substructure of the PNN requires extremely high-resolution modeling, which were enabled by more than 1 million compute hours on the National Science Foundation-funded Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). Adnan and his team were able to access TACC resources through a unique initiative, called the University of Texas Research Cyberinfrastructure (UTRC), which gives researchers from the state’s 14 public universities and health centers access to TACC’s systems and staff expertise. (a) Neurons surrounded by the ECM in the CNS. The region in ECM in the immediate vicinities of neurons are called Perinuronal Net (PNN). The components of PNN are shown in the magnified view (adapted from Fig. 1 of 37) (Permitted reprint) and (b–d) Schematic of pre-, during, and post-collapse bubble. Credit: University of Texas at Austin Explore further The team focused on the damage in hyaluronan, which is the net’s main structural component. Their results show that the localized supersonic forces created by an asymmetrical bubble collapse may generate a phenomenon known as a “water hammer” – a powerful pressure wave – which can break the hyaluronan. The research improves current knowledge and understanding of the connection between damage to the perineuronal net and neurodegenerative disorders.”Dr. Adnan’s recently published findings offer important insight into how the brain is affected in combat scenarios,” said Duane Dimos, UTA vice president for research. “Understanding the effects of blast injuries on the brain and knowing that cavitation occurs is an important step toward finding better ways to prevent traumatic brain injuries on the battlefield.”STUDYING SPACE SHUTTLE MATERIALS WITH SUPERCOMPUTERSParallel to his brain research, Adnan works on way to develop strong ceramic-based materials for advanced structural applications, notably for space shuttle reentry vehicles.His computational designs of novel multiphase ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials are helping to better understand these materials, so new, better ones can be created. Citation: Researchers use simulations to study brain damage from bomb blasts and materials for space shuttles (2018, January 24) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-simulations-brain-blasts-materials-space.html The team ran 36 sets of simulations, each modeling the interactions of more than a million atoms, and used thousands of computer processors simultaneously.”The study suggests that when a shock waves comes in the brain, the wave can reach the atomistic scale and interact with the water molecules, biomolecules and even the ions,” Adnan said. “The science spans from the atomistic scale to the macroscopic scale—nine orders of magnitude larger. At different length scales, we have different physics and time-frames that we have to capture and we can’t ignore one over the other. So, we have to model this complicated system in the most detailed way possible to see what’s going on.” In January 2018, Adnan and his PhD student Md. Riaz Kayser published a paper in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society, in collaboration with experimentalists from Missouri Science and Tech describing a molecular study of the mechanical properties of ZrB2 (Zirconium diboride) and ZrC-ZrB2 (a Zirconium carbide-Zirconium diboride nano-composite).”These materials belong to a class of refractory ceramics called Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics or UHTCs, one of only a few material systems that can be used for hypersonic vehicles,” Adnan said. “The vehicles go at such high speed that they need to survive temperatures above 3600 degree Fahrenheit and most materials will just melt. UHTCs are the only materials that can survive under extreme conditions.”Though tough and heat-resistant, these metal-ceramic hybrids are fragile. In the Columbia shuttle disaster of 2003, a ceramic tile broke and came off and the material underneath melted, leading to the crash. Adnan’s overall goal is to improve the properties of the material so they don’t easily shatter.”We revealed through our study that the conventional wisdom, that if you put a nanoparticle in the system you’d always get better results, is not necessarily guaranteed,” he explained. “What we observed is that the strength of grain-boundary materials at the nanoscale are weaker than any other part of the material. As such, the presence of nanoparticles doesn’t improve their strength. The paper is about finding the fundamental reason behind why nano-reinforcement isn’t always very effective. We need to design our manufacturing process to get the best out of the nanoparticle infusion in ceramic materials.”Though this line of research seems a far cry from simulations of brain-damaging bomb blasts, it is actually much more similar than it first appears.”My interest is in the behavior of materials at the atomic scale. The tools that I use are the same, it’s just the application that are different,” Adnan said. “We have the experience in our group and among our collaborators that allows us to be highly diversified and multidisciplinary.” Explosions produce unique patterns of injury seldom seen outside combat. They have the potential to cause life-threatening injuries and take a particular toll on the brain. Cavitation-collapse triggered by shock. Shock velocity?=?5.35?km/s, bubble radii?=?10?nm (top two) and 5?nm (bottom two). Scale for velocity color map is Km/s. Credit: Ashfaq Adnan and Yuan Ting Wu This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. As tensile stress is applied across the ends of the nanocomposites, failure locations are visitable at the particle-matrix interaction and across the grain boundaries. This images confirms why presence of nanoparticle did not give any enhancement in strength. Credit: Ashfaq Adnan and Md. Riaz Kayser , Scientific Reports Provided by University of Texas at Austin Brain damage could occur from blast-induced cavitation More information: Md. Riaz Kayser et al, Grain boundary driven mechanical properties of ZrB2 And ZrC-ZrB2 nanocomposite: A molecular simulation study, Journal of the American Ceramic Society (2018). DOI: 10.1111/jace.15443 Yuan-Ting Wu et al. Effect of Shock-Induced Cavitation Bubble Collapse on the damage in the Simulated Perineuronal Net of the Brain, Scientific Reports (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-05790-3 read more


Facebook suspends hundreds of apps over data concerns

first_imgFacebook says it has suspended more than 400 of thousands of applications it has investigated to determine whether people’s personal information was being improperly shared Explore further Facebook on Wednesday said it has suspended more than 400 of thousands of applications it has investigated to determine whether people’s personal information was being improperly shared. © 2018 AFP Facebook suspends 200 apps over data misuse (Update)center_img Applications were suspended “due to concerns around the developers who built them or how the information people chose to share with the app may have been used,” vice president of product partnerships Ime Archibong said in a blog post.Apps put on hold at the social network were being scrutinized more closely, according to Archibong.The app unit launched in March by Facebook stemmed from the Cambridge Analytica data privacy scandal.Facebook admitted that up to 87 million users may have had their data hijacked by Cambridge Analytica, which was working for Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.Archibong said that a myPersonality app was banned by the social network for not agreeing to an audit and “because it’s clear that they shared information with researchers as well as companies with only limited protections in place.”Facebook planned to notify the approximately four million members of the social network who shared information with myPersonality, which was active mostly prior to 2012, according to Archibong.Facebook has modified app data sharing policies since the Cambridge Analytica scandal.”We will continue to investigate apps and make the changes needed to our platform to ensure that we are doing all we can to protect people’s information,” Archibong said.Britain’s data regulator said last month that it will fine Facebook half a million pounds for failing to protect user data, as part of its investigation into whether personal information was misused ahead of the Brexit referendum.The Information Commissioner’s Office began investigating the social media giant earlier this year due to the Cambridge Analytica data mishandling.Cambridge Analytica has denied accusations and has filed for bankruptcy in the United States and Britain.Silicon Valley-based Facebook last month acknowledged it faces multiple inquiries from regulators about the Cambridge Analytica user data scandal.Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg apologized to the European Parliament in May and said the social media giant is taking steps to prevent such a breach from happening again.Zuckerberg was grilled about the breach in US Congress in April. Citation: Facebook suspends hundreds of apps over data concerns (2018, August 23) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-facebook-hundreds-apps.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Common sense in robots isnt so common but this Pictionarylike game could

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. At the Allen Institute of Artificial Intelligence, a private research center perched on the north shore of Lake Union in Seattle, computer scientists are working on imbuing software with humanlike abilities to recognize images and understand language that could someday make that sort of collaboration possible.Their latest effort is a game modeled on the guessing-and-drawing diversion Pictionary, itself a Seattle product. Iconary can be played in collaboration with a collection of algorithms nicknamed AllenAI, capable of deciphering symbols and language, and even deploying something approaching common sense, said Ani Kembhavi, senior research scientist at the institute.The game is available online and is free to play at iconary.allenai.org/ . Players depict a word or phrase using a selection of icons and symbols such as arrows, musical notes, human figures and buildings (actual human drawings, like those used in Pictionary, confused the system. Human players still draw, but the drawings pull up a menu of symbols like in the an auto-complete feature of text messaging programs). AllenAI guesses at the phrase or individual words within it. The human player can swap roles with AllenAI to guess phrases that the system depicts.In a demonstration, Kembhavi tried to get AllenAI to guess the phrase “children singing in a classroom.” He selected icons for two boys and a girl, a couple of musical notes, a desk and a laptop computer and submitted the scene. AllenAI guessed “people singing at a table,” “crowd singing in a room,” “audience singing in a restaurant.””All plausible, on the right track,” Kembhavi said. AllenAI “understood that someone is singing somewhere.”He drew again, adding an icon of a white board to try to better depict the classroom part of the phrase. Kembhavi said the back-and-forth between human player and machine is exciting; AllenAI uses all of a player’s past drawings and its past guesses to inform its next guess. After another tweak, the system guessed correctly. Picture-guessing game play with computer will help AI effort grow some common sense Explore further “It’s collaborative, it’s communicative, it’s not adversarial,” he said.In recent years, advanced software systems—given the ill-defined label of artificial intelligence (A.I.) – have famously bested humans at chess and Go. These games, however, have rigid and explicit rules and clearly defined winners and losers within their limited contexts.AlphaGo, DeepBlue and more recent A.I. systems that play large-scale online strategy games such as StarCraft represent remarkable achievements, Kembhavi said, but show the limits of these systems as much as their potential. There is little of the real-world’s ambiguity and nuance in a given chess position.”The algorithms that work, they’re quite intellectually stimulating, but they cannot be picked up and used on a robot or A.I. agent for a real-world application,” Kembhavi said.They’re also adversarial, zero-sum exercises pitting people against machines, evoking fictional depictions of killer robots and A.I. systems that subjugate humanity.In contrast, a player works with the Iconary A.I. system to accomplish a task. That’s an attribute of the system the researchers are excited to build on as more people play the game, providing feedback and data to improve it. Their goal is a “collaborative experience so natural and compelling you wouldn’t know there wasn’t a human on the other end,” writes Kembhavi, collaborator Carissa Schoenick and Allen Institute head Oren Etzioni in a blog post.Pictionary, the game on which Iconary is based, was created in Seattle in 1985 by Robert Angel, who was waiting tables at the time. Tens of millions of copies have been sold and the game is still on the market today, now owned by Mattel.The visual and linguistic aspects of Pictionary make it “a compelling sandbox for our experiments,” Kembhavi said. A good Pictionary player, he said, has many of the attributes—communication, common sense and the ability to complete tasks—that you would want in a digital assistant or robot.AllenAI merges linguistic and visual skills in the context of the game, with a dose of what Kembhavi terms “common sense reasoning.” That’s a very human concept, approximated in this system by word associations. For example, the word “dinner” is a meal associated with evening, which is associated with the moon. So AllenAI might guess “dinner” for a depiction of a meal and a moon.The system employs natural language understanding to associate words in human speech with their various meanings and connotations. Such systems “learn” word meanings by processing large bodies of text—often annotated by humans for the purpose of training algorithms—and parsing attributes such as sentence structure and word patterns.Kembhavi sees AllenAI as a step on the path toward a more general artificial intelligence—which is one of the goals Paul Allen set out for the institute when he launched it in 2013. It now employs more than 100 people.”We’re trying to come up with a system that can learn how to use common sense knowledge in effective ways,” he said.The name AllenAI is an homage to Paul Allen, selected after his death last year. “We were all obviously very affected by the news,” Kembhavi said, adding that he believes Allen would have been “quite excited with this progress.”center_img ©2019 The Seattle Times Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Citation: Common sense in robots isn’t so common, but this Pictionary-like game could help change that (2019, February 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-common-robots-isnt-pictionary-like-game.html Super Bowl commercials this year featured robots and intelligent assistants interacting with humans in ways that far surpass the capabilities of real-world systems today. In one rather meta advertisement for a telecom provider, robots brainstorm with humans to come up with the premise for another commercial.last_img read more


Kemba Walker will forever love Michael Jordan

first_imgThe three-time All-Star guard paid tribute to Hornets owner and NBA great Jordan on Wednesday at his introductory Celtics press conference.”He had a great influence on me. First of all, he drafted me. He gave me my opportunity to play in this league,” Walker said. Related News “You can see all the banners upstairs and in the arena. It’s a winning organization and I want to win ⁠- that’s what I’m about.”Throughout my basketball career and as a pro, I haven’t won consistently, and I just want to get a taste of that. I thought that this was the best place for me to do that.” “He allowed me to play through mistakes, allowed me as a person, as a man. I love that dude, that’s my guy, we have a great relationship.”I’ll forever love him because of the opportunity he gave me.”sharp dressed man pic.twitter.com/UmY3C1vWXE- Boston Celtics (@celtics) July 17, 2019Walker has reportedly signed a four-year, $141 million max contract with the Celtics, who are 17-time NBA champions.The 29-year-old said he was eager for success with Boston after reaching the playoffs just twice in eight seasons in Charlotte.”For me, it’s the competitiveness of this organization, they’ve been winning for years,” Walker said. Celtics guard Kemba Walker will “forever love” Michael Jordan for giving him a chance in the NBA.Walker joined the Celtics via sign and trade earlier this month, ending an eight-season stay in Charlotte with the Bobcats and Hornets. Celtics rumors: Boston ‘is not done making moves’ this offseason Enes Kanter trolls Kyrie Irving as he explains why he’ll wear No. 11 with Celtics Tacko Fall could make Celtics’ roster, team taking ‘his development very seriously,’ Danny Ainge sayslast_img read more


Portugal charges 89 Hells Angels after Lisbon attack last year

first_img Related News World 10 Jul 2019 Moroccan jailed by Portugal for recruiting for Syrian war LISBON (Reuters) – Portuguese prosecutors have charged 89 members of the Hells Angels motorcycle club with involvement in organised crime, attempted murder, robbery and drug trafficking, the public prosecutor’s office said on Thursday.The indictments follow a long investigation that has already led to dozens of arrests of Portuguese and foreign bikers. The prosecutor’s indictment alleges that in March last year, armed with knives, axes and batons, the accused attempted to kill four people and seriously injured others at a restaurant on the outskirts of Portugal’s capital Lisbon. The restaurant was destroyed in the attack.”According to the indictment, the accused belong to Hells Angels Motorcycle Club,” the statement said. World 21 May 2019 Portugal arrests 17 Hells Angels biker gang members in raids across country Of the 89, 37 are in pre-trial detention, five are at home under electronic surveillance and two are detained in Germany awaiting extradition to Portugal, the prosecutors said. The authorities said at the time the attacks were part of a turf war for control of illicit guns and drug trade. The bikers were also charged with qualified extortion, possession of illegal weapons and ammunition. The Hells Angels Motorcycle Club was formed in the United States in 1948 and has branches around the world, including in Portugal since 2002. The US-based club nor their lawyers in Portugal could not immediately be reached for comment. (Reporting by Catarina Demony; Editing by Andrei Khalip and Alexandra Hudson)center_img World 29 May 2019 Dutch court bans “violent” Hells Angels motorcycle club Related News {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more


3 labourers from Rajasthan run over by train near Surat

first_img Next Press Trust of India SuratJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 18:06 IST Image used for representation.Three persons were killed after being hit by a speeding train near Surat railway station Saturday morning, railway police said.The victims got down from a train between Surat and Udhna stations and were crossing the tracks when they were hit by the Karnavati Express.They were part of a group of six labourers from Rajasthan who were heading for Valsad for a job. One of them died on the spot, while the other two succumbed to injuries at the civil hospital here.The deceased were identified as Kuldip Kulsingh (18), Pravin Narayan Singh (19) and Pravin Dheer Singh (19).The group had travelled to Surat by the Ajmer Puri Express and took another train to go to Valsad.When some passengers told them that the train did not halt at Valsad, they got down before Udhna station as the train slowed down, police said.Also Read | Two labourers enter borewell without safety aids in Noida, dieAlso Watch | One dead, two missing after being swept away while working on a Delhi Jal Board projectFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhan 3 labourers from Rajasthan run over by train near SuratThe victims got down from a train between Surat and Udhna stations and were crossing the tracks when they were hit by the Karnavati Express.advertisementlast_img read more