Baker Institute conference to look at role of advertisements in subway culture

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Franz BrotzenPHONE: 713-348-6775E-MAIL: franz.brotzen@rice.eduBaker Institute conference to look at role of advertisements in ‘subway culture’Twelve years of research on advertisements in subway stations in China and other countries will be presented at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy during a daylong conference Oct. 18 on the use of public spaces in cities for advertising. Every day, hundreds of millions of commuters pass through subway and railway stations where they encounter advertisements from local, national and transnational groups, governments and corporations, said conference organizer Steven Lewis, the C.V. Starr Transnational China Fellow at the Baker Institute. The conference will examine such questions as: What are these advertisements promoting? What do commuters think about the ad presence in these new spaces? Are subways considered to be public spaces or private spaces? Do subway stations and their advertisements contribute to civic, national or transnational identity? Or do they isolate the people who pass through them?One of the most important forces in globalization is advertising, Lewis said. Speaking in local languages, marketers hawk many of the same products and services on television, in print and from billboards around the world. Local governments, national governments and nongovernmental organizations also put out public service ads that ask people to save energy, conserve water, clean the environment, prevent diseases and contribute to disaster relief.Lewis will share his analysis of images that he and colleagues have collected from subway ads in China during the past 12 years. This year he and his fellow researchers began broadening their study this year to include surveys of ads in subway systems from all continents: from Cairo to Helsinki, from Paris to Munich, from Ankara to Kuala Lumpur, from Buenos Aires to Mexico City and from Beijing to Tokyo and Seoul. Lewis said this is the first time scholars have collected a global sample of advertisements that are seen by hundreds of millions of commuters every day. In addition to Lewis, other speakers at the conference include Anru Lee, a professor of anthropology at City University of New York, who will discuss her research on the norms and practices of commuters in the subway systems of Taipei, Taiwan; Hongmei Li, a professor of advertising at Georgia State University, who studies local and national appeals in specific outdoor advertising campaigns in Chinese cities; Tani Barlow, director of Rice’s Chao Center, an expert on the history of advertising culture in Shanghai from the Republican period; Megan Ferry, a professor at Union College, whose talk will focus on the transnational circulation of Chinese posters and visual imagery during the Cultural Revolution and more recently; and Geneva Henry, director of the Center for Digital Scholarship at Rice’s Fondren Library, who will speak on how technological advancements have enabled new forms of remote scholar-to-scholar collective archiving of digital images of advertising.Zoe Shen, director of international development at Horizon Survey Research in Beijing, will present the results of a pioneering survey of subway commuters in March 2010 in Beijing, Guangzhou, Nanjing and Shanghai. The survey asked commuters about their perceptions of the social norms and practices of commuters in these public spaces, and their views on the role that public service and commercial advertisements play in influencing themselves and their fellow commuters.“Although this conference might seem a little out of place in Houston, a city without a subway system, I think it is very relevant to the future of Houston,” said Lewis, who is also associate director of Rice’s Chao Center for Asian Studies. He pointed out that the research deals with Houston’s competitors — the global cities and frequent economic partners in Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Taipei, Singapore and other major cities. “Our research looks at the commercial and public service ads that hundreds of millions of middle-class and working-class commuters in these cities see every day on their way to work. Our unique collection of images of ads from these subway systems — started in 1998 — helps us understand how corporations, governments and nongovernmental organizations are all trying to influence this very influential population, asking them to think of themselves as local, national and global citizens.” Lewis added that all of the material is also collected in a new digital image archive built with the help of Fondren Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship and the support of the Henry Luce Foundation of New York. “Because we have collected thousands of images of these advertisements, we are able to do what commuters and policymakers cannot do. We can look at long-term and short-term trends, and compare how these ads are different across cities and even different societies,” he said.Titled “Subway Culture and Advertising Culture,” the event will begin at 9 a.m. in Baker Hall’s Kelly International Conference Facility on the Rice University campus, 6100 Main St. For directions, go to http://bakerinstitute.org/contact_directions.cfm.For more on the conference, go to http://bakerinstitute.org/events/subway-culture-and-advertising-culture.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Franz Brotzen at franz.brotzen@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.last_img read more


Economic and social growth of developing nations may increase obesity says new

first_imgAddThis ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduAmy Hodges713-348-6777amy.hodges@rice.eduHOUSTON – (March 14, 2012) – Developing nations experiencing economic and social growth might also see growing waistlines among their poorest citizens, according to a new study from Rice University and the University of Colorado.The researchers found that while growth of developing countries may improve conditions such as malnutrition and infectious disease, it may increase obesity among people with lower socio-economic status.“It’s a troubling finding,” said Rice sociology professor Justin Denney, who co-authored the study with University of Colorado sociology professors Fred Pampel and Patrick Krueger. Their study will appear in the April issue of Social Science & Medicine. The researchers examined data from the World Health Survey, an initiative of the World Health Organization aimed at collecting high-quality health data for people across all regions of the world. The researchers looked at data from 67 of the 70 countries surveyed during 2002 and 2003.“In many cases, developing nations are still dealing with issues such as hunger and infectious disease, especially among the most disadvantaged segments of their population,” Denney said. “At the same time, they’re dealing with a whole new set of health issues that emerge as they continue to develop.”The study also showed that people with higher socio-economic status in developing countries are more likely to be obese, whereas people with higher socio-economic status living in developed countries are less likely. Denney said that can be attributed to the different cultural values/norms at play in developing versus developed countries.“In the developing world, being large comes with its own status and prestige, whereas in the developed world, being large is stigmatized,” he said. “There’s sort of a switching of cultural ideals, and these results are consistent with that.”Denney said the reasons for increased incidence of obesity among the socio-economically disadvantaged living in developed countries are twofold: There is a lack of education about health issues and a lack of access to high-quality, healthy (and in many cases, more expensive) food.“Unfortunately, our research suggests that if a country develops to the state of the U.S., in all likelihood you’ll see the same thing that’s happening here in our country,” Denney said. “Obesity is a major problem here in the U.S., but primarily for the most disadvantaged segments of the population.”Denney hopes the study will promote further research of the worldwide obesity epidemic.“Social and economic development of a country helps many people, but it also brings these new issues that need consideration, particularly on a global scale,” Denney said. “If we’re going to start thinking about worldwide health policies, it might be beneficial for them to target specific groups of people.”The study was funded by a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to the University of Colorado Population Center.-30-Related links:Study: Obesity, SES, and economic development: A test of the reversal hypothesis: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953612000561Justin Denney bio: http://sociology.rice.edu/denneyRice University Department of Sociology: http://sociology.rice.eduEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: http://www.nichd.nih.govUniversity of Colorado Population Center: http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/cupcLocated on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is known for its “unconventional wisdom.” With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 4 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to www.rice.edu/nationalmedia/Rice.pdf.last_img read more


Rice U professors share LemelsonMIT award donate prize money

first_imgA low-cost fluorescence microscope that uses a battery-powered LED flashlight. The Global Focus Microscope can be manufactured for about one-10th the cost of a conventional fluorescence microscope. Some 20 prototypes of the device are in field tests worldwide.“What is striking about these great professors is their vision that undergraduates can develop robust, inexpensive, technical solutions to solve real problems, and that the students can go to places like Malawi, deploy their prototypes and make the necessary modifications and improvements to deliver sustainable, practical, working devices,” said Ned Thomas, the William and Stephanie Sick Dean of Rice’s George R. Brown School of Engineering.The Lemelson-MIT Program and its awards are named for Jerome H. Lemelson, one of U.S. history’s most prolific inventors. Lemelson and his wife, Dorothy, founded the Lemelson-MIT Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994.“By introducing their undergraduate students to the health care challenges that exist in low-resource areas, and training those students in the invention process both inside and outside of the classroom, Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden have created a group of young inventors who are developing solutions that save lives,” said Joshua Schuler, executive director of the Lemelson-MIT Program. “The Lemelson-MIT Program’s award winners are chosen based on their own technological inventiveness and their ability to inspire the next generation of inventors. With several inventions in the field and many of the Beyond Traditional Borders students going on to include technology and global health as a focus of their careers, Rebecca and Maria are outstanding award winners and role models.”###The following VIDEOS are available at:Day One: The story behind the projecthttp://youtu.be/nE4TePkhHWoDay One: bubble CPAP in Malawihttp://youtu.be/B0rGMRdZiOYHigh-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0501-LEMELSON-two-lg.jpgCAPTION: Maria Oden (left) and Rebecca Richards-Kortum at Rice University’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen in Houston.CREDIT: Jeff Fitlow/Rice UniversityTo learn more about Rice 360°’s Day One project, visit:http://www.rice360.rice.edu/dayoneprojectFor information about the Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation, visit:http://web.mit.edu/invent/ ShareMEDIA CONTACTS:Jeff Falk713-348-6775jfalk@rice.eduJade Boyd713-348-6778jadeboyd@rice.eduRice U. professors share Lemelson-MIT award, donate prize moneyDuo gives $100,000 prize to launch Day One Project, build nursery at Malawi hospitalHOUSTON — (May 1, 2013) — Rice University bioengineering professors Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden, the winners of the 2013 $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation, are donating their prize money toward the construction of a new neonatal ward at the African hospital that has helped implement Rice’s low-cost, student-designed health care technologies since 2007.Maria Oden (left) and Rebecca Richards-Kortum at Rice University’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen in Houston.The Lemelson-MIT Program today announced that Oden and Richards-Kortum won the prestigious award in honor of their life-saving inventions and pioneering efforts to inspire and lead Rice students to invent and deliver low-cost technological innovations to improve health care for people in developing nations.“When Maria and I learned we had won this award, we both knew exactly how we wanted to use the prize money,” Richards-Kortum said. “Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) in Blantyre (Malawi) is an extraordinary place that is committed to caring for the world’s most vulnerable patients. The physicians there have shown us how simple innovations can dramatically improve neonatal health, and they’ve inspired us to engage our students in solving the challenges of newborn care in low-resource settings.”Oden and Richards-Kortum are two of the driving forces behind the Rice 360° Institute for Global Health Technologies and Rice 360°’s award-winning, hands-on engineering education program Beyond Traditional Borders (BTB). BTB is an engineering-design program founded in 2006 with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. More than 10 percent of Rice undergraduates — including many non-engineering students — have participated in BTB, which has produced 58 low-cost health technologies, including two that are already being broadly distributed by national health authorities in the developing world.“Each year, more than 3 million babies die within the first month of life,” Oden said. “Ninety-nine percent of those deaths happen in the developing world, and many of them could be prevented if hospitals in low-income countries had access to a few low-cost technologies that combat the most common causes of infant mortality.”Oden and Richards-Kortum said the new QECH nursery will provide excellent care for newborns and serve as an innovation hub for the design, evaluation and implementation of Rice 360°’s Day One Project, an ambitious $375,000 effort to improve the lives of newborns in the developing world from the day they are born. Through the Day One Project, Rice 360° aims to create a collection of low-cost, neonatal technologies that a district hospital serving 250,000 people can implement for about $5,000.“Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden have applied outstanding research and motivated our innovative students to use simple technology to improve health care in the world’s poorest regions,” said Rice President David Leebron. “As teachers, they have challenged their students to become leaders who use their skills in the service of others and betterment of our world, in this case saving babies’ lives, and that is a fundamental part of Rice’s mission.”Richards-Kortum, the Stanley C. Moore Professor and chair of Rice’s Department of Bioengineering, also directs Rice 360°. Oden, professor in the practice of bioengineering and director of Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen, coordinates the technical design efforts of BTB students.BTB students work in teams to design technologies that address health care challenges identified by clinicians in the developing world. Each summer, about a dozen Rice students take the year’s most promising BTB designs to Africa and Latin America for evaluation under the guidance of physicians and nurses in clinics and hospitals. More than 90 percent of BTB summer interns plan to incorporate global health activities into their careers after graduation.The Lemelson-MIT Program celebrates outstanding innovators and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention. The program recognized Richards-Kortum and Oden for several BTB technologies, including Rice’s “bubble CPAP” system, or bCPAP, a respiratory support system for newborns that uses low-cost aquarium pumps to generate “continuous positive airway pressure” (CPAP).CPAP technology helps keep a child’s lungs inflated and makes it easier for them to breathe. The technology, which is particularly beneficial for premature newborns with immature lungs and for infants who are fighting severe respiratory infections, is widely available in the developed world, but the machines there cost about $6,000 and are too expensive for most developing world hospitals.Doctors at QECH challenged Rice’s BTB students to come up with a lower-cost alternative, and they created bCPAP, a $400 system that delivers the same therapeutic flow and pressure as systems used in the developed world. BTB evaluated the device at QECH in a clinical trial funded by Saving Lives at Birth, a joint program of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Norwegian government, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Grand Challenges Canada and the World Bank. The clinical trial found that bCPAP greatly improved the survival rates for premature babies. BTB is now working with Malawi’s Ministry of Health to implement Rice’s system in all of the country’s hospitals.Richards-Kortum and Oden said the Day One project is designed to replicate the success of bCPAP. Day One uses the methods pioneered in the bCPAP project to refine, implement and evaluate other neonatal technologies developed at Rice that will address the primary causes of infant mortality.“We are accepting the $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation on behalf of all of the people at Rice, the Texas Medical Center and around the world who have helped to make BTB’s work possible,” Oden said. “Our decision to donate the prize money to QECH is a way to recognize the efforts of our students and collaborators, while ensuring that more life-saving technologies like bCPAP will be used to improve neonatal care in the developing world.”Other BTB innovations recognized by the Lemelson-MIT Program include:DoseRight Syringe Clips, which improve dosing accuracy in the delivery of AIDS-fighting drugs that must be delivered in precise quantities to prevent the transmission of HIV from infected mothers to their babies. The clips are being used in Swaziland, Africa. FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more


Kilauea eruption an opportunity for undersea scrutiny

first_imghttps://youtu.be/Pfsh5FPiigQCAPTION: Video by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan, taken from a helicopter on July 16, shows lava from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaii as it moves from the volcano to the sea. Morgan and her colleagues spent a week placing ocean-bottom seismic instruments off the southeastern shore of the island. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University)Images for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-1-web-2o6dob0.jpgLava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) Lava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) Rice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) Return to article. Long Description http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-3-web-2bj6qci.jpgRice University researchers who joined colleagues on the Big Island of Hawaii this month to place seismic instruments also took the opportunity to fly over the ongoing eruption of Kilauea July 16. With their pilot and standing from left: Jackie Caplan-Auerbach of Western Washington University, Julia Morgan of Rice, Yang Shen of the University of Rhode Island and David Blank of Rice. (Credit: Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-4-web-23ssyf1.jpgRice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) Lava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) A cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-2-web-28hl50e.jpgLava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) Rice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionBlank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. Photo courtesy of David Blank“The frequency of these failures is very low and the interval between them is very high,” Morgan said. “We think this happened at Kilauea between 25,000 and 50,000 years ago, and we know it happened on (adjacent volcano) Mauna Loa about 100,000 years ago, and probably more than once before that.”While the risk of an imminent avalanche is slim, she said, the eruption, earthquake and aftershocks presented an irresistible opportunity to get a better look at the island’s hidden terrain. Every new quake that occurs along Kilauea’s rift zones and around the perimeter of the Hilina Slump and the bench helps the researchers understand the terrain.Morgan said the United States Geological Survey, which operates the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, has a host of ground-based seismometers but none in the ocean. She said monitors at sea will reveal quakes under the bench that are too small for land seismometers to sense.“The (initial) earthquake seems to have caused earthquakes beneath the outer bench,” Morgan said. “If that outer bench is the buttress to the slump, and that bench is beginning to show seismicity, it’s moving. At what point does it collapse?”The seismometers are deployed around the Hilina Slump, close to shore where lava is entering the ocean and on the outer bench in line with the initial quake. “That way, aftershocks from the earthquake could be picked up and would record characteristics of the fault zone that slipped,” she said. Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan.“They’re still going on,” said Morgan, who returned to Houston last week after seven days aboard a vessel deployed to place instruments and map the area. “In addition, a bunch of earthquakes occurred in other portions of the (island) flank. That’s what really got my attention.”Her interest in geologic structures, particularly relating to volcano deformation and faulting, led her to study the ocean bed off the Big Island’s coast for years. In a 2003 paper, Morgan and her colleagues used marine seismic reflection data to look inside Kilauea’s underwater slope for the boundaries of an active landslide, the Hilina Slump, as well as signs of previous avalanches.The researchers determined that the Hilina Slump is restricted to the upper slopes of the volcano, and the lower slopes consist of a large pile of ancient avalanche debris that was pushed by Kilauea’s sliding, gravity-driven flank into a massive, mile-high bench about 15 miles offshore. This outer bench currently buttresses the Hilina Slump, preventing it from breaking away from the volcano slopes.“We mapped out the geometry and extent of the slump and tried to develop a history of how it came to be,” she said of the paper.“Essentially, Kilauea is a bulldozer sliding out on the ocean crust and scraping off packages of strata that have accumulated,” Morgan said. The Hilina Slump rides on top of the sliding flank, she said. Return to article. Long DescriptionLava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. Photo by David Blank-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Slope failure and volcanic spreading along the submarine south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2003JB002411Instability of Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 4 in “Characteristics of Hawaiian Volcanoes” (USGS): https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp18014Julia Morgan bio: https://earthscience.rice.edu/directory/user/100/Rice Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences: https://earthscience.rice.eduWiess School of Natural Sciences: https://naturalsciences.rice.eduVideo: Lava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionLava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. Photo by Julia Morgan“If this outer bench is experiencing earthquakes, we want to know what surfaces are experiencing them. Along the base? Within the bench? Some new fault that we didn’t know about? This data will provide us the ability to determine what structures, or faults, are actually slipping.”While Blank worked days on the ship to help deploy the instruments, Morgan chose the night shift for mapping – and a better view of lava hitting the water. After their duty at sea, both took the unique opportunity to book a helicopter flight over the volcano, following the river of lava to the sea.“If you’re following the flows, you can look down and watch the lava tear across the countryside,” she said. “Then you go out to the lava ocean entry. You see these littoral explosions as the lava is flowing into the ocean. You might get a big pulse of lava and suddenly it gets cooled and quenched so rapidly that it just explodes up into the air.”They also spent time talking with locals in Hilo, the largest city on the main island, about the eruption that has already claimed more than 700 homes. “People there know they live with Pele,” Morgan said. “I found they were generally sanguine about it. Sad, but they knew that something like this could happen.“It’s a tragedy, for sure, but it’s also nature doing what nature does.” Rice University researchers who joined colleagues on the Big Island of Hawaii this month to place seismic instruments also took the opportunity to fly over the ongoing eruption of Kilauea July 16. With their pilot and standing from left: Jackie Caplan-Auerbach of Western Washington University, Julia Morgan of Rice, Yang Shen of the University of Rhode Island and David Blank of Rice. (Credit: Rice University) Lava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) A cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801) Rice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description Rice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-6-web-1webbsy.jpgA cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-5-web-1ygq81s.jpgRice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) ShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to video and high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduKilauea eruption an opportunity for undersea scrutinyRice University researchers help deliver seismometers to analyze Hawaiian volcano, quakesHOUSTON – (July 23, 2018) – Rice University researchers joined a team of scientists placing seismometers under the ocean off the coast of Hawaii, where the ongoing eruption of Kilauea has already claimed more than 700 homes and added to the island’s landmass. The researchers hope for new insight about the landscape under the ocean floor.Video by Rice Professor Julia Morgan, taken from a helicopter on July 16, shows lava from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaii as it moves from the volcano to the sea. Morgan and her colleagues spent a week placing ocean-bottom seismic instruments off the southeastern shore of the island.Julia Morgan, a professor of Earth, environmental and planetary sciences, and student David Blank were awarded a National Science Foundation RAPID grant to join a team of researchers and seed the seafloor with a dozen seismic detectors off the southeastern coast of the island in the wake of the 6.9 magnitude earthquake that occurred at the start of the eruption of Kilauea May 4.The instruments will gather data until September, when they will be retrieved, and are expected to provide an extensive record of earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of the world’s most active volcano over two months. Return to article. Long DescriptionA cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. Click on the image for a larger version. Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey“Remarkably, after this earthquake, all the boundaries of the slump also lit up with small earthquakes. These clearly occurred on a different fault than the main earthquake, suggesting that the slump crept downslope during or after that event,” she said.Morgan said the bench appears to be stable, presumably supporting the slump — although if it collapsed, the slump would follow and the results could be catastrophic. “If the slump were to fail catastrophically, it would create an amazing tsunami that would hit the West Coast. We have not seen this in historic times,” she said. Return to article. Long Description FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more


US Student Freed From North Korea Has Severe Brain Injury

first_img Share Show Discussion Otto Frederick Warmbier, a University of Virginia student who has been detained in North Korea since early January, attends a news conference in Pyongyang, North Korea, in this photo released by Kyodo on Feb. 29, 2016. (Mandatory credit REUTERS/Kyodo) US Student Freed From North Korea Has Severe Brain Injury By Reuters June 15, 2017 Updated: June 15, 2017 Share this articlecenter_img WYOMING, Ohio—An American university student who was detained for 17 months in North Korea and suffered a serious neurological injury was “brutalized” while in custody, his father said on Thursday.Despite the “severe” injury, Otto Warmbier, 22, is stable and receiving treatment at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, center spokeswoman Kelly Martin said at a news briefing at Warmbier‘s high school in Wyoming, Ohio.Doctors will provide further details about Warmbier‘s condition on Thursday afternoon.Dr. Jordan Bonomo (L), a Neurointensivist, Dr. Daniel Kanter (C), Medical Director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, and Dr. Brandon Forman (R), a Neurointensive Care Specialist, field questions about the condition and treatment of Otto Warmbier during a news conference at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston) Dr. Jordan Bonomo (L), a Neurointensivist, Dr. Daniel Kanter (C), Medical Director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, and Dr. Brandon Forman (R), a Neurointensive Care Specialist, field questions about the condition and treatment of Otto Warmbier during a news conference at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)Warmbier has been in a coma since March 2016, shortly after he was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor in North Korea, the family said on Tuesday after he was released.He was arrested for trying to steal an item with a propaganda slogan, North Korean media reported. The University of Virginia student was “brutalized and terrorized” by the North Korean regime, his father Fred Warmbier said at the news conference two days after his son was returned.Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston) Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)Fred Warmbier said the family did not believe North Korea’s story, that his son had fallen into a coma after contracting botulism and being given a sleeping pill.“We don’t believe anything they (North Korea) say,” said Fred Warmbier, who was wearing a sport coat Otto Warmbier had worn during a broadcast confession of his crimes last year in North Korea.The New York Times previously cited a senior U.S. official as saying Washington had received intelligence reports Warmbier was repeatedly beaten while in captivity.‘Stunned’Fred Warmbier said he was stunned when told of his son’s condition one week ago.“I don’t know what being in shock is, but I’m pretty sure I was,” Fred Warmbier said, referring to being informed Otto Warmbier was in a coma.Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston) Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)“There is no excuse for any civilized nation to have kept his condition secret and denied him top-notch medical care for so long,” he added.He said his wife, Cindy, had not left their son’s side since his return to the United States.Blue and white ribbons, representing the colors of the high school, were tied around trees and telephone polls throughout Wyoming, a northern Cincinnati suburb of about 8,000 people.Related CoverageSuspected North Korea Drone Spied on US Anti-Missile SystemFred Warmbier said of his son’s release by the regime: “They did not do this out of the kindness of their hearts.”President Donald Trump spoke to Fred Warmbier on Wednesday night, Warmbier said. Trump discussed how Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Joseph Yun, the U.S. State Department’s special envoy on North Korea, worked together to help secure Otto’s release,Warmbier said.By Ginny McCabe  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   US last_img read more


Colonial Pipeline Shuts Down Major Fuel Line Over Harvey

first_img Share this article A pipeline that provides gasoline to the southern United States was shut down Thursday, Aug. 31 amid concerns over Harvey’s effect on its facilities in Louisiana.Georgia-based Colonial Pipeline said in a statement that the pipeline will be shut off on Thursday. It had already shut down its other main line, which transports other types of fuel.Refinery outages triggered the pipeline shutdown.The pipeline provides about 40 percent of the South’s gasoline, connecting to Atlanta, Nashville, Charlotte, Greensboro, Raleigh-Durham, Dulles, and the Baltimore-Washington airports. Houses are seen submerged in flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. (REUTERS/Adrees Latif) Houses are seen submerged in flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. (REUTERS/Adrees Latif) About half of the company’s 26 refineries that supply its pipeline are located between Houston and Lake Charles, Louisiana.“Once Colonial is able to ensure that its facilities are safe to operate and refiners in Lake Charles and points east have the ability to move product to Colonial, our system will resume operations,” the operator said. It estimates being able to return to service from Houston on Sunday.Parts of Colonial Pipeline were shut down for several days during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005.Volunteer rescuers evacuate people from a flooded residential area during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Floodwaters have breached a levee south of the city of Houston, officials said Tuesday, urging residents to leave the area immediately. (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images) Volunteer rescuers evacuate people from a flooded residential area during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)Colonial, by volume, is the largest pipeline operator in the United States, delivering more than 100 million gallons of fuel and gas each day.Some experts said that the shutdown might spike gas prices.Colonial, however, notes on its website that it is one part of the fuel delivery system. “There are multiple means of supplying the market to mitigate concerns with supply, including other pipelines, trucks, and barges.”According to AAA, nationwide gas prices have climbed by about 3 percent in the last week to $2.40 for a gallon of regular.Josh Carrasco, a spokesman for AAA AutoClub Group, told NBC that gas prices for Labor Day will be the highest since 2014.“At this point, we’re at a wait-and-see situation to see how much damage is done to those refineries in the Gulf Coast area,” Carrasco said. “And then we’ll have more clarity down the road.”Harvey made landfall in southern Texas as a Category 4 hurricane the night of Aug. 25 and dumped a huge amount of rain—more than 50 inches in some parts—triggering widespread flooding in Houston and other areas. Louisiana was also hit by the storm, albeit not as hard. Overall, 32,000 people have been sent to shelters, and over 30 people have been confirmed dead. Colonial Pipeline Shuts Down Major Fuel Line Over Harvey By Jack Phillips August 31, 2017 Updated: August 31, 2017 Share  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   center_img US (Colonial Pipeline) Show Discussionlast_img read more


Teen Firefighter Trainee Battling Cancer—With Some Help From His Friends

first_img US News The Hy-View Fire Department at work (http://www.hyviewfire.org) Show Discussion Share this article Sharecenter_img  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Teen Firefighter Trainee Battling Cancer—With Some Help From His Friends By Chris Jasurek March 8, 2018 Updated: March 8, 2018 Sixteen-year-old Timothy Richardson is on leave from the Hy-View Fire Company’s Explorer program, while he fights leukemia—in a different shirt every day.Timothy is the son of a firefighter, and all he has ever wanted to do with his life was to follow in his dad’s footsteps—risking his own safety to help others.“Knowing that people are on their worst days, just knowing that, and you can help them in their worst times, it really just gives you a sense of pride,” Timothy told WGRZ.It will be a while before Timothy resumes his fireman training, though.Timothy will be spending a lot of time flat on his back in a hospital bed while chemotherapy drugs are pumped into his body to battle the cancer cells. The Maryvale, New York High School junior will spend the next month in Oishei Children’s Hospital in Buffalo. He will be under treatment for a total of about two years.Timothy could have asked for any kind of help. He could have asked for money, free transportation and lodging for his parents, anything. His fellow firefighters would have happily done whatever they could.What kind of help has he asked for? T-shirts.While he’s in the hospital, Timothy hopes to be able to wear the shirt of a different firehouse every day.“I put the feelers out, town of Hamburg, town of Amherst, West Seneca, anybody that I knew and the outpouring has just been phenomenal,” said Hy-View safety officer and Explorer advisor Joe Lent told WKYC.“I didn’t expect anything less. Timmy’s going to have a lot of shirts to wear.”Richardson’s father, Matthew is a firefighter at U-Crest Fire Company in Cheektowaga. His sister Michelle, 19, is a former firefighter Explorer. Now Timothy is learning that all firefighters are part of his family.“He knows he has his brotherhood of the fire department behind him,” Timothy’s mother, Deanna, told WKYC.From a Runny Nose to a Dangerous DiseaseTimothy’s ordeal started on Feb. 15 when he had a doctor check out what looked like a sinus infection, according to his Facebook page.He was back in less than a week with swollen glands in his neck.A series of biopsies over the next few weeks eventually revealed the dreaded diagnosis: the teen had leukemia.Doctors are adamant that Timothy has leukemia, not lymphoma. Leukemia is much more easily treatable.His Facebook page, “Timmy’s Battle,” says, “Timmy is allowed to have visitors and is encouraged to have visitors.” The family just asks that people call ahead to make sure he is feeling well enough at the moment.For anyone who wants to send a T-shirt: Tim’s size is mens XL and his address is:Timothy Richardson at John R. Oishei Children’s Hospital818 Ellicott St Buffalo NY 14203ATT: J 12 SouthRoom 1210From NTD.tvRecommended Video: Snowboarder Survives Avalanche in Canadalast_img read more


FBI Mueller Team Obscured Two Key Papadopoulos Meetings in Legal Documents

first_img Share News AnalysisTwo key meetings involving Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos appear to have been intentionally obscured in legal documents unsealed by the FBI and special counsel Robert Mueller.The documents also shed light on the unusual timing of Papadopoulos’s agreement with Mueller’s team, which was reached within hours after he was arrested—without a lawyer present.On July 27, 2017, Papadopoulos flew into Washington Dulles International Airport at 7 p.m. from Munich, Germany. He was arrested by the FBI immediately upon arrival. No warrant, indictment, or criminal complaint was used during his arrest.Papadopoulos was booked several hours later, at 1:45 a.m. on July 28, and was checked out to “federal authority” at 8:27 a.m. that morning. Papadopoulos then made a same-day appearance in court, with all of that done without a defense attorney present.Despite the lack of legal representation, Papadopoulos agreed to cooperate with the Mueller investigation and his case was sealed. On Oct. 5, 2017, Papadopoulos—in a closed courtroom—entered a plea of guilty for lying to the FBI. Documents surrounding the Papadopoulos case then were unsealed on Oct. 30, 2017—the same day an indictment was unsealed against Paul Manafort and Rick Gates.The specific timing of Papadopoulos’ arrest appears strangely coincidental. It was that same day—July 27, 2017—that Special Counsel Mueller and Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein were informed by Inspector General Horowitz of his discovery of the Page–Strzok texts. From a Dec. 13, 2017, letter that Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz sent to Senators Ron Johnson and Chuck Grassley:“On July 27, 2017, upon our identification of many of the political text messages, the Inspector General met with the Deputy Attorney General and the Special Counsel to inform them of the texts that we had discovered, and provided them with a significant number of the texts, so that they could take any management action they deemed appropriate.”Five days after the arrest of Papadopoulos, Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein quietly issued the Aug. 2, 2017, revised “Scope of Investigation & Definition of Authority” memo to special counsel Mueller.This sequence of events wasn’t Papadopoulos’ first interaction with the FBI.Papadopoulos had been extensively interviewed by FBI Agent Robert M. Gibbs exactly six months earlier, on Jan. 27, 2017. During the interview, Papadopoulos made “material false statements and omitted material facts” to the FBI.A follow-up FBI interview took place on Feb. 16, 2017. The next day, Papadopoulos deleted his Facebook account. According to the FBI, “that account contained communications with Russian nationals and other foreign contacts during the Campaign that contradicted statements he had made to the FBI.”Papadopoulos had maintained the same Facebook account since 2005. A few days later, on Feb. 23, 2017, Papadopoulos got rid of his cell phone and changed phone numbers.There are two legal versions of events relating to Papadopoulos.One from the July 28, 2017, affidavit signed by FBI Agent Robert M. Gibbs, and one from the Oct. 5, 2017, Statement of the Offense “signed” by Robert Mueller–and undersigned by Jeannie S. Rhee, Andrew D. Goldstein, and Aaron S.J. Zelinsky.To the casual eye, these documents provide a relatively similar version of events, although there are some differences:Maltese academic Joseph Mifsud is known as “Foreign Contact 1” in the July 27, 2017, Affidavit and “the professor” in the Oct. 5, 2017, unsealed Statement of Offense.Olga Polonskaya, introduced as “Putin’s niece” is known as “Foreign Contact 3” July 27, 2017, Affidavit and “Female Russian National” in the Oct. 5, 2017, unsealed Statement of Offense.Ivan Timofeev is referred to as “Foreign Contact 2” in the July 27, 2017, Affidavit and the “Russian MFA Connection” in the Oct. 5, 2017, unsealed Statement of Offense.The Mueller version has a tendency to emphasize Papadopoulos’s Russian contacts and the Gibbs version presents events in a slightly differing timeline format, but the overall presentation of events remains reasonably similar through June 1, 2016.However, after June 1, 2016, the Mueller version suddenly becomes vague, in relation to direct foreign contacts by Papadopoulos:“From mid-June through mid-August 2016, PAPADOPOULOS pursued an ‘off the record’ meeting between one or more Campaign representatives and ‘members of president putin’s office and the mfa.’ For example, on or about June 19, 2016, after several email and Skype exchanges with the Russian MFA Connection, defendant PAPADOPOULOS emailed the High­-Ranking Campaign Official, with the subject line ‘New message from Russia.’”The Gibbs version contains a bit more information for this period, listing four separate contacts with Timofeev in July 2016 and one belated contact with Mifsud in October 2016.The final contact with Timofeev (Foreign Contact 2) in July 2016 is documented as follows:“On or about July 22, 2016, PAPADOPOULOS messaged Foreign Contact 2 on Facebook to ask whether Foreign Contact 2 knew a particular individual with extensive ties to Russian-based businesses and persons. PAPADOPOULOS asked Foreign Contact 2 ‘[i]f you know any background of him that is noteworthy before I see him, kindly send my way.’”The Mueller version simply doesn’t address this contact and the Gibbs version fails to identify or provide any more detail on the “particular individual with extensive ties to Russian-based businesses and persons.”But an article in The Daily Caller provides some crucial information:“Mangiante [now married to Papadopoulos], an Italian national, confirmed to The DCNF that [Sergei] Millian is the individual Papadopoulos described in a July 22, 2016, Facebook message that is cited in documents the special counsel’s office released in October.“Papadopoulos and Millian met days after the July 22, 2016, Facebook message.”The Wall Street Journal has reported on Millian as being both Source D and E in the Steele dossier. There are all kinds of questions surrounding Millian. The fact that he was meeting with Papadopoulos in July 2016 is material. So why did the Mueller team specifically ignore this entire sequence of events in their Oct. 5, 2017 unsealed Statement of Offense. The Gibbs version provides a bit more detail but also fails to note the Millian meeting.The same day that Papadopoulos sent his Facebook message to Timofeev regarding Millian, Australia supposedly told the FBI of comments Papadopoulos made during his fateful meeting with Alexander Downer. These comments would be offered as the basis for the opening of the FBI’s Counterintelligence investigation on July 31, 2016.Second or even third-hand comments from Millian had already made their way into the July 20, 2016 memo in the Steele dossier, forming some of the most outlandish bits of the document.Additional information stemming from Millian would appear in later dossier memos as well. But the legal descriptions of events specifically ignore the potentially important meeting between Papadopoulos and Millian.One other meeting also ignored in the legal documents—the May 10, 2016 meeting between Papadopoulos and Alexander Downer. That’s the same meeting the FBI used as justification in the opening of their Counterintelligence investigation into an opposing candidates political campaign.Jeff Carlson is a CFA® Charterholder. He has worked for 20 years as an analyst and portfolio manager in the high-yield bond market. He runs the website TheMarketsWork.com Trump Presidency FBI, Mueller Team Obscured Two Key Papadopoulos Meetings in Legal Documents By Jeff Carlson August 15, 2018 Updated: June 18, 2019 Former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos leaves after his sentencing hearing at U.S. District Court in Washington on Sept. 7, 2018. (Reuters/Yuri Gripas) center_img Share this article Show Discussion  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   last_img read more


QualityAuto 1080p720p480p360p240pRewind 10 Seconds

first_img  QualityAuto 1080p720p480p360p240pRewind 10 SecondsNext UpLive00:0000:0000:00ChromecastClosed CaptionsSettingsFullscreen  click to watch video Which Products Are Subject to Recall?The recall covers 5-pound plastic packages of Tyson White Meat Panko Chicken Nuggets. The products feature the “Best if used by” date stamp of “Nov. 26, 2019.”FSIS said the recalled nuggets have a case code “3308SDL03” and time stamps “23:00 through 01:59 (inclusive).” It added that the products were shipped nationwide and have the establishment number “P-13556” inside the USDA mark of inspection. food labels of recalled chicken Labels of recalled processed chicken products that may contain rubber. (USDA)recalled food label FSIS warns some of the product may be in peoples’ freezers and should be thrown away or returned to its place of purchase. (USDA)What Should Consumers Do?No reports have been received so far about any illness or adverse health reactions by consumers who may have eaten the contaminated nuggets.But federal health officials warn some products may be in consumers’ freezers and are warning people not to eat them.“These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase,” the Food Safety and Inspection Service said.Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tyson Consumer Relations at 1-888-747-7611, FSIS said.Recent RecallsThe recall comes days after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that cartons of fresh peaches, nectarines, and plums sold in dozens of states were being recalled over possible listeria contamination.The FDA said on Jan. 24 that Jac. Vandenberg Inc. of Yonkers, New York, was recalling 1,727 cartons of peaches, 1,207 of nectarines, and 365 cartons of plums due to the possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, a germ that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections for young children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems.Listeria or listeriosis is a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated by the germ Listeria monocytogenes. The illness mainly affects pregnant women, young children, the elderly, and people with a weakened immune system, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Invasive listeriosis, meaning the bacteria has spread beyond the gut, is a much more serious version of the disease.People infected by invasive listeriosis can experience a variety of symptoms, depending on the person and the part of the body affected. It can cause fever, diarrhea, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, muscle aches, and convulsions. Follow Tom on Twitter: @OZImekTOM Certain batches of Tyson brand processed chicken nuggets have been recalled due to concern about possible contamination with rubber. (USDA) Show Discussion US News Share Tyson Foods has recalled more than 36,000 pounds of chicken nuggets because they may be contaminated with rubber.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said in a news release on Tuesday, Jan. 30, that the problem was discovered when the company received consumer complaints that Panko Chicken Nugget products contained an extraneous foreign material that did not seem to be chicken.“Tyson Foods Inc., a Sedalia, Mo. establishment, is recalling approximately 36,420 pounds of chicken nugget products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically rubber,” FSIS said. The government agency added that FSIS received notification on Jan. 29 that there was a problem with the processed meat product.Tyson representatives cited by ABC6 described the material as “small pieces of soft, blue plastic in the nuggets.”  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Share this article Tyson Chicken Nuggets Recalled Because They May Contain Rubber By Tom Ozimek January 30, 2019 Updated: January 30, 2019last_img read more


He did postdoctoral research at Stanford and began

first_imgHe did postdoctoral research at Stanford and began the gene editing project after returning to his homeland for a job at Southern University of Science and Technology of China in Shenzhen.Several Stanford professors including He’s former adviser, Stephen Quake; bioethicist Dr. William Hurlbut and genetics expert Dr. Matthew Porteus have said they were in contact with He over the last year. Stanford University has started a review of interactions that some faculty members had with He Jiankui, the Chinese scientist who claims to have helped make gene-edited babies.Several Stanford professors have said they knew or strongly suspected He wanted to try gene editing on embryos intended for pregnancy.The work has been widely criticized since November, when He revealed the births of twins whose DNA he said he altered to try to help them resist possible future infection with the AIDS virus.Most scientists think gene editing for reproductive purposes is too risky to be tried yet because of the danger of harming other genes and because the DNA changes may be passed to future generations. Share this article Last month, Chinese investigators said He had evaded supervision of his work and violated research norms because he wanted to be famous. The report said He could face consequences, although it didn’t say which regulations he may have broken.By Marilynn Marchione Show Discussion An embryo receives a small dose of Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a sperm injection microscope in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China’s Guangdong province. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein) Share Stanford Probes Faculty Ties to China Gene-Edited Baby Work By The Associated Press February 7, 2019 Updated: February 8, 2019  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Dr. William Hurlbut responds to readers’ questions about gene-editing & evolution @BQOmagazine: https://t.co/uItoqZWED1— Big Questions Online (@BQOmagazine) March 17, 2017 Hurlbut said Thursday that university officials suggested that he refer inquiries to them instead of responding himself. Porteus declined to comment. Quake did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Hurlbut and Porteus said they disapproved of and discouraged any such experiment. Quake said he only discussed the matter in broad, general terms with He.After He’s work was revealed, Rice University in Houston announced an investigation into interactions between He and his former adviser at that school, Michael Deem.On Thursday, Stanford spokesman E.J. Miranda said in an email that Stanford is reviewing “the circumstances around Dr. He’s interactions with researchers at the university.” Miranda said he had no additional information on questions about who would do the review, what would be examined and how long it would take. US News Stanford’s @DavidRelman and @HankGreelyLSJU discuss the ethics of DIY gene-editing kits in @mercnews: https://t.co/rwkcK2uWzv— Stanford Medicine (@StanfordMed) January 13, 2016 “I think the most frightening thing is that we would use it in such a way that it transforms the world in a way that walks us right out of our own story,” Dr. William Hurlbut, adjunct professor at Stanford University, on CRISPR. pic.twitter.com/9IdEUL9rTf— CBS News (@CBSNews) November 9, 2017last_img read more