Disabled activists are calling for Iain Duncan Smi

first_imgDisabled activists are calling for Iain Duncan Smith to face a criminal investigation over his refusal to address a coroner’s concerns about the safety of the “fitness for work” test, which led to “countless deaths” over the last six years.They want to hold Duncan Smith – and his former employment minister Chris Grayling – to account for their failure to improve the safety of the work capability assessment (WCA) even though they were warned that it risked causing further deaths.Tomorrow (25 March), one leading disabled activist will meet with two officers from Police Scotland so he can hand over a dossier of evidence calling for Duncan Smith (pictured) and Grayling to face charges of misconduct in public office.John McArdle, co-founder of Scottish-based Black Triangle, said he believed that Duncan Smith and Grayling had shown “reckless disregard for the lives of disabled people”.He said: “For so long, the government has acted with sheer contempt for the rule of law.“It is time they woke up and realised that the law doesn’t only apply to us, but to them equally.”McArdle said he believed there was sufficient evidence for a file to be submitted by Police Scotland to the Procurator Fiscal, the Scottish equivalent of the Crown Prosecution Service.He said he had “no doubt whatsoever” that Duncan Smith and Grayling had both “knowingly” neglected their public duty, and added: “The facts speak for themselves.”The call for a police investigation came as activists from Disabled People Against Cuts, the Mental Health Resistance Network and other grassroots organisations staged a protest on Wednesday (23 March) in the central lobby of the House of Commons during prime minister’s questions, calling for an end to deaths caused by benefit cuts.Black Triangle and other campaigning organisations and individuals spoke out after Duncan Smith resigned as work and pensions secretary in protest – he claimed – at being forced to make fresh cuts to disability benefits in last week’s budget.Disabled activists were astonished at Duncan Smith’s attempt to dodge responsibility for six years of cuts to disability benefits, and to position himself as a defender of disabled people.They pointed to his refusal – and that of Grayling – to act on concerns raised by a coroner following the suicide of Stephen Carré in January 2010.They said that this refusal amounted to misconduct in public office, a criminal offence which carries a maximum sentence of life in prison.On its website, the Crown Prosecution Service says that such an offence is committed “when the office holder acts (or fails to act) in a way that constitutes a breach of the duties of that office”.Campaigners point to a legal precedent in which a police officer was convicted of misconduct in public office when he refused to intervene during a disturbance in which a man was kicked to death.They say that that conviction has strong parallels with the failure of Duncan Smith and Grayling to act after they were warned of the WCA’s flaws following the death of Stephen Carré.So far, the call for a criminal investigation has been backed by many of the country’s leading disabled activists and disabled people’s organisations, including Inclusion London, Disabled People Against Cuts, Equal Lives, WOWcampaign, Professor Peter Beresford, the Mental Health Resistance Network, Pat’s Petition, and the Cross Border Alliance.Mark Harrison, chief executive of Equal Lives, said: “The political process has failed disabled people, so this now needs to be tested in the courts as the only way of getting justice.”Disabled researcher and campaigner Catherine Hale said the Stephen Carré scandal provided “incriminating evidence of how IDS and Grayling failed to act on a coroner’s concerns over the safety of the WCA, and put thousands of other lives at risk.“We have a duty to bring these cases to light and try to bring justice for the families involved.”When they were appointed in May 2010, Duncan Smith and Grayling assumed responsibility for responding to a letter written by coroner Tom Osborne, who carried out the inquest into Stephen Carré’s death, and had serious concerns about the safety of the WCA.Osborne asked the work and pensions secretary Yvette Cooper – who never saw the letter, as the general election was called just days after it arrived – to review the policy not to seek medical evidence from a GP or psychiatrist if someone applying for out-of-work disability benefits had a mental health condition.But Duncan Smith and Grayling dismissed the letter – according to a draft Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) response that was only sent to Osborne last month, more than five years after it was written – and failed to show it to Professor Malcolm Harrington, the independent expert they had appointed to review the WCA, while also deciding to roll out the test to hundreds of thousands of long-term claimants of incapacity benefit, many of whom had mental health conditions.Many campaigners believe that the decision of Duncan Smith and Grayling to ignore Osborne’s letter led to countless other deaths.In December 2011, a long-term incapacity benefit (IB) claimant – Ms D E – killed herself after being told she was not eligible for ESA; her case was linked by the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland to the failure to obtain further medical evidence.In 2014, another coroner wrote an almost identical letter to Osborne’s, again warning of concerns about the safety of the WCA, after the death of a north London man, who also took his own life after being found fit for work.And last November, government-funded research concluded that the programme to reassess people claiming IB using the WCA could have caused 590 suicides in just three years.Duncan Smith and his ministerial colleagues have also been trying for three years to defeat legal efforts to make the WCA safer for people with mental health conditions.A long-running judicial review case, brought by the Mental Health Resistance Network (MHRN), resulted 12 months ago in Duncan Smith agreeing to develop a pilot programme to test new ways of collecting further medical evidence. But that pilot project has still not begun.Denise McKenna, co-founder of MHRN, said: “During our judicial review into the WCA, the DWP went to exceptional lengths to argue against taking responsibility for obtaining further medical evidence for claimants with mental health problems, even going so far as to appeal the initial judgement that the WCA substantially disadvantages us.“We were shocked to learn that both before and during the case the DWP had received letters from coroners who had found the cause of individual suicides to be due to failure to obtain or take account of further medical evidence, with the coroners warning that further suicides were likely.“We cannot believe that the DWP’s solicitors were not aware of these cases while they were arguing against us in court.“If they were, they have surely withheld important information from the court, and if they were not, we would want to know why not.”She added: “We are in little doubt that many additional suicides could be linked to the DWP’s refusal to allow mental health claimants a fair opportunity to claim vital financial support.“As the DWP continues to drag its heels over making the WCA fairer for mental health claimants, we expect to hear of more people ending their lives.“It is not beyond reason to perceive the DWP as being to blame for these deaths. It is intolerable for this situation to continue, yet we are at a loss as to how to stop it.“Although we continue to fight to try to lessen the harm caused by the WCA, at the same time we recognise it as a mock assessment and want it scrapped.”Rakesh Singh, a solicitor with The Public Law Project, which represented the two claimants who took the judicial review case, said he was unable to comment on the possibility of a criminal prosecution as he was a civil lawyer.But he said that the upper tribunal had found in May 2013 in the MHRN case that the WCA unfairly discriminated against people with mental health conditions, and that recommendations made by Harrington in November 2012 could make the process fairer. He said DWP had refused to take positive steps to tackle the problem, and had since “come up with excuse after excuse for not implementing change”.  He said: “The DWP has still not started a trial of the changes that it said it would undertake and which a year ago the court said ought to happen as soon as possible. “It seems clear that the DWP under Iain Duncan Smith completely lacked any real commitment or the political will to put to an end the substantial disadvantage that persons with a mental health condition face when they are subjected to the WCA.”A DWP spokesman said: “The role of DWP press office is to deal with current departmental business.  We wouldn’t comment on former secretaries of state or ministers.”last_img read more


Disabled people across the country have marched st

first_imgDisabled people across the country have marched stopped traffic and blocked the office entrances of government contractors as part of a national day of action that drew attention to a disability benefit they say is “rotten to the core”.Campaigners believe the personal independence payment (PIP) system was only introduced as a replacement for working-age disability living allowance (DLA) as a way of removing disabled people’s entitlement to support, as part of the government’s austerity programme.They also point to the growing evidence of the “shoddy nature” of the PIP assessments, carried out by the government’s contractors, Capita and Atos, which they say are “making a killing” from the contracts.The national day of action featured protests at nearly 20 locations across the country, mostly at Atos and Capita assessment centres, including Edinburgh, Glasgow, Sheffield, Norwich, and Brighton (where protesters included retired Paralympian Kristina Veasey).There was also support from the cast of Graeae’s musical Reasons to be Cheerful, who tweeted: “@r2bcheerful cast team are in solidarity with #PIPFightback demos around UK today. ‘No’ to PIP delays, cuts & errors.”The day of action was organised by Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC) and two other user-led, grassroots organisations, WinVisible and the Mental Health Resistance Network.The largest action took place in central London, with scores of protesters blocking traffic and Capita’s main entrance.They then marched to the headquarters of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) in Westminster, before they “faced down the world’s media” on College Green, opposite parliament, as journalists gathered to cover the last day in office of prime minister David Cameron and the first day of his successor, Theresa May.Disabled activists shouted out the names of disabled people who they believe died as a direct result of the government’s social security cuts and reforms.Paula Peters, from DPAC, said she wanted Atos and Capita to lose their assessment contracts, with the process brought back in-house, and for PIP to be scrapped and replaced with the old disability living allowance (DLA).She said: “The assessments are abusive and humiliating, so we want them to stop.”Peters made it clear that disabled people’s anti-cuts protests would continue under the new prime minister.She said: “She is just as guilty as David Cameron of the horrendous human rights abuses disabled people have suffered these past six years.“We won’t stop resisting this government, no matter who the prime minister is.”In central Birmingham, protesters – including two former chairs of the British Council of Disabled People (BCODP) – were outside the PIP assessment centre used by Capita.Sandra Daniels (pictured, centre), from DPAC West Midlands, who organised the protest, said she believed the government wanted to cut the number of people receiving DLA by 25 per cent, and that mental health survivors and people with learning difficulties were among those being subjected to “sham assessments and reassessments”, a process she said was “ongoing” and “relentless”.She said: “I want disabled people to have the benefits and support to be able to be members of the community.“They should be given the resources they need to uphold their human rights and inclusion in society.“They are pushing us back to the margins of society once again. Disabled people are losing their independence and will no longer have the opportunity to reach their full potential.”Anne Pridmore, a former BCODP chair, said she believed the cuts to working-age DLA were “just the start” of a “trickle, trickle” process of cuts to DLA spending, and that the government would eventually begin cutting the higher rate mobility element of DLA from disabled people over the age of 65.She said the programme of PIP cuts “does not make sense. The government wants to get people in work, but if they take their [Motability] cars off them they are not going to be able to go to work.”Bob Williams-Findlay, another former BCODP chair, said: “PIP has had a devastating effect on people’s lives and not only those who have lost it, but people here today who are living in fear of being reassessed.“They know the criteria is so tough that unless you are immobile you are not going to get PIP.”He said PIP had proved to be not only a deliberate cut to spending on disability benefits but also an attempt to “redefine who is and who is not a disabled person”, and he called for it to be replaced with an improved version of DLA.He said: “To me, PIP is the epitome of body fascism because it focuses on the body and it doesn’t focus on the social environment and barriers.”He said he believed PIP contravenes the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which focuses on removing these barriers.Williams-Findlay said: “Looking at the costs of living as a disabled person, what is it that increases our costs? It’s the barriers.”He said he had not yet been reassessed for PIP himself, but added: “I live in fear that I will get rejected, because it takes no account of reality. Can you walk 20 metres? Can you pick up a bag of sugar?”Andrew Comer, a former committee member of Birmingham People First, before it was forced to close this year after losing its funding, said he was waiting to hear the results of his own PIP assessment.He said: “I am concerned about everything from the [closure of the] Independent Living Fund to PIP.“People with all kinds of disabilities are not being listened to by the government.”Another disabled activist, known as “Angry Fish”, who has yet to be reassessed for PIP, said the austerity programme was “doing most damage, and sometimes fatal damage, to disabled people”, including the unnecessary “stress, anxiety and fear” caused by the reassessment process.He said: “People are having their lives totally ruined by the PIP process and austerity.”He pointed to the hundreds of people every week who were losing their Motability vehicles after being reassessed for PIP, which could cause many of them to lose their jobs, which could then cause their personal assistants to lose their jobs.And he called for a new programme to replace PIP, which would provide a “holistic perspective of people’s capacity to engage in society”.Mark Lynes, another Birmingham protester, said he believed PIP was introduced to “take away support from society” and was an attack on the social security system.He said: “A lot of people have lost their total independence. They are struggling and have lost their Motability cars.”Meanwhile, the former senior DWP civil servant Paul Gray has issued a call for evidence as part of his second review of PIP on behalf of the government. The first review took place in 2014.In announcing the call for evidence, work and pensions secretary Stephen Crabb also announced that his department had launched its own evaluation of PIP, with initial findings to be published by early next year.Pensions minister Baroness Altmann said the audit would ensure that the advice provided by Capita and Atos was “of suitable quality, is fully explained and is justified”.Gray, who chairs the social security advisory committee, said the audit followed his recommendation in 2014 that DWP should commission a “rigorous quantitative and qualitative evaluation strategy” to examine the experience of PIP claimants.He said the audit would run alongside his own review and “may help to inform my final conclusions”.Gray said that a “major objective” of his second review would be to assess how “further evidence” was used to reach PIP entitlement decisions which “properly reflect claimant needs and the day-to-day functional impacts of their condition”.This appears to mirror serious, long-standing concerns over DWP’s failure to ensure that the necessary further medical evidence is collected for claimants of employment and support allowance, the out-of-work disability benefit, particularly for those with mental health conditions.last_img read more


Ziplineaerial adventure park to open in Columbus County

first_img The park will offer a mix of varying obstacles, cargo nets, ladders, and zip lines, constantly challenging guests to push their limits.The adult courses increase in difficulty and height as you progress, and can take anywhere from two and a half to four hours to complete. The kids course will range from 6-15 feet in the air, and will not exceed two hours.Cape Fearless Extreme is taking reservations beginning on April 14.Related Article: Deputies search for suspect after fiery crash in Columbus CountyLearn more about the park: www.capefearless.com The park is set on 25 acres of forest and includes fourAdult Courses and one Kids Course. (Photo: Cape Fearless Extreme) RIEGELWOOD, NC (WWAY) — A new aerial adventure park is set to open in Columbus County this spring.Cape Fearless Extreme is a family-friendly adventure is set on 25 acres of forest and includes four Adult Courses and one Kids Course.- Advertisement – last_img read more


Lightning hits at least two Leland homes

first_img Grimes said lightning caused a fire at a home on Lapham Drive in the Wedgewood subdivision off Lanvale Road. A firefighter said the fire was in the home’s attic.The Leland Fire Department works on a home hit by lightning on Pullen Drive in Brunswick Forest on July 3, 2019. (Photo: Kate Cornell/WWAY)Crews from Sunny Point were called in to help Leland Fire Rescue.There’s no word yet on the extent of any damage and no reports of injuries. LELAND, NC (WWAY) — Wednesday’s severe weather led to at least two homes in Leland being hit by lighting.Leland Fire Chief John Grimes said lightning caused some structure damage but no fire at a home on Pullen Drive in Brunswick Forest.- Advertisement – last_img read more


100 Black Men of Coastal North Carolina raising funds to send teens

first_img00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings LELAND, NC (WWAY) — The 100 Black Men of Coastal North Carolina Chapter will be holding its 2nd Annual Awards Recognition and Fundraiser this Saturday at Wrightsville Beach.The concept of “The 100” began in 1963 in New York City when a group of concerned African American men began to meet to explore ways to improve conditions within their community.- Advertisement – “The organization was founded with the principals of mentorship, economic empowerment and health/wellness,” said Yusef Abdur-Razzaaq, a member of the 100 Black men of Coastal North Carolina Chapter.The local chapter was established in 2008.“A group of professional men wanted to do more to help out youth in the community so they started the 100 Black Men of Coastal North Carolina,” Abdur-Razzaaq said. “We have a mentorship program, Saturday Success Academy, so we do our part to help out the youth in the local area.”In addition to mentoring programs for youth, the chapter also raises funds to send students to college.“Our Saturday Success Academy has students in junior high and high school,” he said. “After they complete that program, we help them to apply for college scholarships and we reward them with scholarships when they complete the program.”While Abdur-Razzaaq says his parents did a fantastic job raising him and his brothers, other mentors in his childhood were also valuable to his character development as a youth.“I always had a football coach or someone a little older than me like an honorary big brother, if you will, that can help guide you and give you that mentorship that you desperately need especially at those crucial ages at high school, junior high school to make sure that you make the right decisions that you need to make in life,” Abdur-Razzaaq recalled.To assist with the group’s ongoing mission to mentor teens in the Cape Fear, they are hosting their annual fundraising breakfast Saturday from 9 am to 12 pm at Shell Island Resort located at 2700 North Lumina Avenue, Wrightsville Beach. While the breakfast is free to attend, they will be accepting donations to help with programs planned for the upcoming school year.WWAY Meteorologist Monique Robinson will also serve as Mistress of Ceremonies for the breakfast.If you would like to attend, RSVP through eventbrite.com. The name of the event is The 100 Black Men of Coastal North Carolina Awards Recognition and Benefit Breakfast and the location is Wilmington North Carolina. If you cannot attend but would like to make a donation, click here. You may also email onehundredbmcnc@yahoo.com.last_img read more


Nokia releases an Asha phone with a dedicated WhatsApp button

first_imgAdvertisement HTC and Nokia have previously released handsets with Facebook-devoted buttons, but this marks a first for WhatsApp thanks to  Nokia  releasing a mobile phone with a dedicated WhatsApp physical button.The feature triggers the cross-platform messaging app which offers a free alternative to SMS texts.Analysts suggested the move would make WhatsApp the text app of choice on the handsets, but suggested it would have limited impact on the wider mobile phone market due to it’s limitation to a few mobile phone models.Nokia’s Asha 210 runs on the firm’s proprietary Series 40 operating system and will be targeted at consumers in emerging markets looking for a cheaper alternative to the Finnish firm’s Windows Phone range and other companies’ smartphones. The OS supports third-party web apps and software written in the Java programming language. – Advertisement – To achieve a targeted retail price of £47 ($72) Nokia decided that the device’s 2.4in (6.1cm) screen would not be touch-enabled.Users have to use its built-in Qwerty keyboard and navigation button to launch and operate apps, so having a dedicated key gives WhatsApp an edge over alternatives on the handset.In addition owners of the phone are offered a subscription to the app for the device’s lifespan rather than having to pay the normal annual fee.Nokia  however refused to reveal the financial terms of the arrangement and said it would monitor customer response before deciding whether to include the feature on any of its other devices.According to a study published by tech consultancy Ovum, WhatsApp is the world’s third most popular social messaging service after Facebook Chat and Google Chat.“WhatsApp is doing quite well in emerging markets, but you have local players who are outstripping it simply because they are more culturally specific and can therefore outshine the US firm,” said Neha Dharia, an analyst at Ovum.Since Nokia’s Asha range is predominantly targeted at consumers in Asia, Africa and the Middle East any benefits from the tie-up will come from those territories.WhatsApp Messenger is a cross-platform mobile messaging app which allows you to exchange messages without having to pay for SMS. WhatsApp Messenger is available for iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and Nokia and those phones can all message each other because WhatsApp Messenger uses the same internet data plan that you use for email and web browsing, there is no cost to message and stay in touch with your contactsInformation from BBC News was used in this Article.last_img read more


Google Is Challenging Every Student To Change The World

first_imgAdvertisement Google is back with its annual Science Fair, with the fifth consecutive year of the program opening the door for submission today. The event is run in partnership with Lego Education, National Geographic, Scientific American and Virgin Galactic. It invites any students between 13 and 18 from anywhere in the world to enter submissions online to compete for prizes in a number of categories, ranging from $100,000 in scholarships and grants to once-in-a-lifetime trips of remote destinations, or a first-hand look at Virgin Galactic’s new spacecraft.The Science Fair has produced some incredibly impressive winners in years past, including a flashlight that requires only the ambient heat from a user’s palm gripping the handle to power its beam, as well as wearable tech that can provide real-time effective healthcare response to serious problems associated with an aging population and the onset of Alzheimer’s. This isn’t the kind of science fair where you see a lot of clay volcanoes or scale models of how waves are formed, in other words. – Advertisement – Instead, Google’s Science Fair has the potential to actually solve more problems than you or I could ever hope to even assist with in our lifetime. This year there are new categories, too, meaning more potential for world-changing award winners. A live event on September 21, 2015, will see the final winners announced, after regional finalists are declared on July 2, and 20 ultimate finalists named on August 20.Credit: Techcrunchlast_img read more


New York designer sculpts African Wildlife storm trooper helmets

first_imgBlank William has reinterpreted the familiar features of star wars stormtroopers as a series of wild animal armor. Image Credit: Blank William Advertisement New york-based designer Blank William has reinterpreted the familiar features of star wars stormtroopers as a series of wild animal armor. Three species — a rhino, hippopotamus and elephant — have each been sculpted with the same aesthetic qualities as the fictional film soldiers, characterized by glossy surfaces and gilded gold details. ‘the new order’ collection has been realized in two versions, white and black, each which see animals’ facial features warp and distort to suit the style of stormtroopers’ distinctive plastoid body armor. for the ‘black’ set, elephant tusks, the rhino horn and hippo ears are wrapped in a glistening golden hue; in the ‘white’ series, these same parts are coated in a cool chrome finish.Image Credit: BlankWilliamImage Credit: BlankWilliamImage Credit: BlankWilliamImage Credit: BlankWilliamImage Credit: BlankWilliam[DesignBoom]last_img read more


Toyota set to invest and partner with Uber

first_imgAdvertisement Toyota has today announced that it’s investing an unspecified amount of money in Uber through Toyota Financial Services and Mirai Creation Investment Limited Partnership.The automaker also pannounced that it was partnering with Uber around ridesharing.Toyota said in a statement that the partnership will explore collaboration, starting with trials, in the world of ridesharing in countries where ridesharing is expanding, taking various factors into account such as regulations, business conditions, and customer needs. – Advertisement – It continues that there will be new ways to lease Toyotas and then earn money to cover their monthly payments by driving for Uber, and Uber will buy new Toyotas and Lexuses.The two companies will be “sharing knowledge and accelerating their respective research efforts.”last_img read more


LG Electronics says to jointly develop connected car platform with Volkswagen

first_imgAn employee works at a store of LG Electronics in Seoul July 25, 2012. LG Electronics, the world’s No.2 TV maker, said on Wednesday quarterly profit more than doubled on a jump in TV sales but its cellphone business swung to a worrying loss, squeezed by growing competition from Apple and Samsung as well as low-cost producers in China. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA – Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS LOGO) Advertisement South Korea’s LG Electronics Inc said on Wednesday it will work with German car-maker Volkswagen AG to jointly develop a connected car platform to enable vehicles to communicate with external devices.LG, in a statement, said it and Volkswagen will work to jointly develop over “the next few years” technologies allowing drivers to control and monitor devices in their homes such as lights and security systems, as well as in-vehicle entertainment technologies and an alerting system for drivers providing “recommendations” based on real-time situations.Automakers and technology companies have been forming partnerships in recent years, as the race to develop self-driving cars has created need for more sophisticated components and software that will allow vehicles to seamlessly communicate with various external devices and servers via the internet. – Advertisement – LG Electronics, along with affiliates LG Display Co Ltd and LG Innotek Co Ltd, has identified the auto industry as a new growth driver and has been pushing to grow new businesses amid continued struggles for its mobile phones division.LG and its sister companies last year clinched a deal to supply key components ranging from the battery cells and the electric motor for General Motors Co’s 2017 Chevrolet Bolt electric car, burnishing their credentials. LG companies also supply products such as car audio systems and batteries to Volkswagen.In the statement on Wednesday, Thomas Form, Volkswagen’s head of electronics and vehicle research, called LG a strong partner and said the pair will work to integrate smart home solutions into Volkswagen vehicles.[Reuters]last_img read more


Prisma Now Available for Download to Android Users

first_imgAdvertisement Photo filter app ‘Prisma‘ has created a name for itself around the world within weeks of its release despite being available for iOS users till now. The developers behind the tremendously successful app have now released the app for Android users with Android 4.1 or later and they can get their hands on the app directly from Google PlayStore.The basic concept behind Prisma is fairly simple and it is not something that has not been tried before. The app makes your images look like paintings “using the styles of famous artists: Munk, Picasso as well as world famous ornaments and patterns,” as per its description on Google Play.According to the Next Web, the app has been downloaded around over 10.6 million times just on iOS and has around 1.55 million daily active users. – Advertisement – The photo-app is getting favorable ratings on the Google Play Store and is seen as a serious threat to its competitors.last_img read more


STARTERS ORDERS Friday

first_img[dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Friday 9 JanuaryRACING1.45 LingfieldPharmaceutical 2/1 > 5/41.55 HuntingdonArbeo 9/2 > 11/43.25 LingfieldGiant Sequoia 12/1 > 9/2FOOTBALL12.45pm3/1 Sunderland 10/11 Liverpool 13/5 DRAWWhat’s your view?CALL STAR SPORTS ON 08000 521 321last_img


£50 FREE BET Man U v Everton

first_img£50 FREE BET IFMAN U WIN 2-0To celebrate the launch of our brand new betting site starsports.bet we are giving all NEW CUSTOMERS a £50 FREE BET if MAN U WIN 2-0.You simply need to open an account and place a bet at evens or above, of at least £10, on any market at starsports.bet between 9am on Sunday 28 October and 4pm on Sunday 28 October. TERMS AND CONDITIONS(1) This promotion is for new account holders only. To qualify, you must open a new account at starsports.bet anytime from 9am on Sunday 28 October to 4pm (GMT) on Sunday 28 October.(2) In addition you must place at least one bet online with starsports.bet before 4pm (GMT) on Sunday 28 October. The bet must be for a stake of £10 (or more), on a selection at evens or above, on any market as displayed on the starsports.bet web site.(3) The bonus promotional offer of £50 will be paid as a Free Bet if MAN U WIN 2-0 (Man U v Everton 4pm). The Free Bet will be valid for a period of 7 days from the point of issue and must be used within this period otherwise will expire.(4) If, for any reason, the event(s) do not take place or are declared void for betting purposes this offer will also be voided.(5) The bonus Free Bet, if successful, will be credited within 48 hours, direct to your online account.(6) Free Bets may not be used in conjunction with any other current promotion.(7) Star Sports reserve the right to withdraw or refuse any Free Bet promotion at any point.(8) Free Bet stakes are not returned with winnings.(9) Free Bet awards cannot be exchanged for cash.(10) Free Bet awards can be used online, tablet or mobile only.(11) The Free Bet must be used within the timeframe specified on the promotion details and may not be either part used or carried forward.(12) This promotion can only be used once per person and per account. Only one bonus can be awarded per person, household, shared computer or shared IP address. In the event of a customer opening more that one account to claim multiple offers we reserve the right to suspend/close duplicate accounts and void any bets placed.(13) Usual Star Sports Betting Rules and Terms and Conditions apply, these can be viewed at starsports.bet.(14) If you have any further questions about this promotion you can contact our customer service team cs@www.starsportsbet.co.uklast_img read more


Baker Institute conference to look at role of advertisements in subway culture

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Franz BrotzenPHONE: 713-348-6775E-MAIL: franz.brotzen@rice.eduBaker Institute conference to look at role of advertisements in ‘subway culture’Twelve years of research on advertisements in subway stations in China and other countries will be presented at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy during a daylong conference Oct. 18 on the use of public spaces in cities for advertising. Every day, hundreds of millions of commuters pass through subway and railway stations where they encounter advertisements from local, national and transnational groups, governments and corporations, said conference organizer Steven Lewis, the C.V. Starr Transnational China Fellow at the Baker Institute. The conference will examine such questions as: What are these advertisements promoting? What do commuters think about the ad presence in these new spaces? Are subways considered to be public spaces or private spaces? Do subway stations and their advertisements contribute to civic, national or transnational identity? Or do they isolate the people who pass through them?One of the most important forces in globalization is advertising, Lewis said. Speaking in local languages, marketers hawk many of the same products and services on television, in print and from billboards around the world. Local governments, national governments and nongovernmental organizations also put out public service ads that ask people to save energy, conserve water, clean the environment, prevent diseases and contribute to disaster relief.Lewis will share his analysis of images that he and colleagues have collected from subway ads in China during the past 12 years. This year he and his fellow researchers began broadening their study this year to include surveys of ads in subway systems from all continents: from Cairo to Helsinki, from Paris to Munich, from Ankara to Kuala Lumpur, from Buenos Aires to Mexico City and from Beijing to Tokyo and Seoul. Lewis said this is the first time scholars have collected a global sample of advertisements that are seen by hundreds of millions of commuters every day. In addition to Lewis, other speakers at the conference include Anru Lee, a professor of anthropology at City University of New York, who will discuss her research on the norms and practices of commuters in the subway systems of Taipei, Taiwan; Hongmei Li, a professor of advertising at Georgia State University, who studies local and national appeals in specific outdoor advertising campaigns in Chinese cities; Tani Barlow, director of Rice’s Chao Center, an expert on the history of advertising culture in Shanghai from the Republican period; Megan Ferry, a professor at Union College, whose talk will focus on the transnational circulation of Chinese posters and visual imagery during the Cultural Revolution and more recently; and Geneva Henry, director of the Center for Digital Scholarship at Rice’s Fondren Library, who will speak on how technological advancements have enabled new forms of remote scholar-to-scholar collective archiving of digital images of advertising.Zoe Shen, director of international development at Horizon Survey Research in Beijing, will present the results of a pioneering survey of subway commuters in March 2010 in Beijing, Guangzhou, Nanjing and Shanghai. The survey asked commuters about their perceptions of the social norms and practices of commuters in these public spaces, and their views on the role that public service and commercial advertisements play in influencing themselves and their fellow commuters.“Although this conference might seem a little out of place in Houston, a city without a subway system, I think it is very relevant to the future of Houston,” said Lewis, who is also associate director of Rice’s Chao Center for Asian Studies. He pointed out that the research deals with Houston’s competitors — the global cities and frequent economic partners in Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Taipei, Singapore and other major cities. “Our research looks at the commercial and public service ads that hundreds of millions of middle-class and working-class commuters in these cities see every day on their way to work. Our unique collection of images of ads from these subway systems — started in 1998 — helps us understand how corporations, governments and nongovernmental organizations are all trying to influence this very influential population, asking them to think of themselves as local, national and global citizens.” Lewis added that all of the material is also collected in a new digital image archive built with the help of Fondren Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship and the support of the Henry Luce Foundation of New York. “Because we have collected thousands of images of these advertisements, we are able to do what commuters and policymakers cannot do. We can look at long-term and short-term trends, and compare how these ads are different across cities and even different societies,” he said.Titled “Subway Culture and Advertising Culture,” the event will begin at 9 a.m. in Baker Hall’s Kelly International Conference Facility on the Rice University campus, 6100 Main St. For directions, go to http://bakerinstitute.org/contact_directions.cfm.For more on the conference, go to http://bakerinstitute.org/events/subway-culture-and-advertising-culture.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Franz Brotzen at franz.brotzen@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.last_img read more


Economic and social growth of developing nations may increase obesity says new

first_imgAddThis ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduAmy Hodges713-348-6777amy.hodges@rice.eduHOUSTON – (March 14, 2012) – Developing nations experiencing economic and social growth might also see growing waistlines among their poorest citizens, according to a new study from Rice University and the University of Colorado.The researchers found that while growth of developing countries may improve conditions such as malnutrition and infectious disease, it may increase obesity among people with lower socio-economic status.“It’s a troubling finding,” said Rice sociology professor Justin Denney, who co-authored the study with University of Colorado sociology professors Fred Pampel and Patrick Krueger. Their study will appear in the April issue of Social Science & Medicine. The researchers examined data from the World Health Survey, an initiative of the World Health Organization aimed at collecting high-quality health data for people across all regions of the world. The researchers looked at data from 67 of the 70 countries surveyed during 2002 and 2003.“In many cases, developing nations are still dealing with issues such as hunger and infectious disease, especially among the most disadvantaged segments of their population,” Denney said. “At the same time, they’re dealing with a whole new set of health issues that emerge as they continue to develop.”The study also showed that people with higher socio-economic status in developing countries are more likely to be obese, whereas people with higher socio-economic status living in developed countries are less likely. Denney said that can be attributed to the different cultural values/norms at play in developing versus developed countries.“In the developing world, being large comes with its own status and prestige, whereas in the developed world, being large is stigmatized,” he said. “There’s sort of a switching of cultural ideals, and these results are consistent with that.”Denney said the reasons for increased incidence of obesity among the socio-economically disadvantaged living in developed countries are twofold: There is a lack of education about health issues and a lack of access to high-quality, healthy (and in many cases, more expensive) food.“Unfortunately, our research suggests that if a country develops to the state of the U.S., in all likelihood you’ll see the same thing that’s happening here in our country,” Denney said. “Obesity is a major problem here in the U.S., but primarily for the most disadvantaged segments of the population.”Denney hopes the study will promote further research of the worldwide obesity epidemic.“Social and economic development of a country helps many people, but it also brings these new issues that need consideration, particularly on a global scale,” Denney said. “If we’re going to start thinking about worldwide health policies, it might be beneficial for them to target specific groups of people.”The study was funded by a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to the University of Colorado Population Center.-30-Related links:Study: Obesity, SES, and economic development: A test of the reversal hypothesis: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953612000561Justin Denney bio: http://sociology.rice.edu/denneyRice University Department of Sociology: http://sociology.rice.eduEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: http://www.nichd.nih.govUniversity of Colorado Population Center: http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/cupcLocated on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is known for its “unconventional wisdom.” With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 4 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to www.rice.edu/nationalmedia/Rice.pdf.last_img read more


Rice U professors share LemelsonMIT award donate prize money

first_imgA low-cost fluorescence microscope that uses a battery-powered LED flashlight. The Global Focus Microscope can be manufactured for about one-10th the cost of a conventional fluorescence microscope. Some 20 prototypes of the device are in field tests worldwide.“What is striking about these great professors is their vision that undergraduates can develop robust, inexpensive, technical solutions to solve real problems, and that the students can go to places like Malawi, deploy their prototypes and make the necessary modifications and improvements to deliver sustainable, practical, working devices,” said Ned Thomas, the William and Stephanie Sick Dean of Rice’s George R. Brown School of Engineering.The Lemelson-MIT Program and its awards are named for Jerome H. Lemelson, one of U.S. history’s most prolific inventors. Lemelson and his wife, Dorothy, founded the Lemelson-MIT Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994.“By introducing their undergraduate students to the health care challenges that exist in low-resource areas, and training those students in the invention process both inside and outside of the classroom, Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden have created a group of young inventors who are developing solutions that save lives,” said Joshua Schuler, executive director of the Lemelson-MIT Program. “The Lemelson-MIT Program’s award winners are chosen based on their own technological inventiveness and their ability to inspire the next generation of inventors. With several inventions in the field and many of the Beyond Traditional Borders students going on to include technology and global health as a focus of their careers, Rebecca and Maria are outstanding award winners and role models.”###The following VIDEOS are available at:Day One: The story behind the projecthttp://youtu.be/nE4TePkhHWoDay One: bubble CPAP in Malawihttp://youtu.be/B0rGMRdZiOYHigh-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0501-LEMELSON-two-lg.jpgCAPTION: Maria Oden (left) and Rebecca Richards-Kortum at Rice University’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen in Houston.CREDIT: Jeff Fitlow/Rice UniversityTo learn more about Rice 360°’s Day One project, visit:http://www.rice360.rice.edu/dayoneprojectFor information about the Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation, visit:http://web.mit.edu/invent/ ShareMEDIA CONTACTS:Jeff Falk713-348-6775jfalk@rice.eduJade Boyd713-348-6778jadeboyd@rice.eduRice U. professors share Lemelson-MIT award, donate prize moneyDuo gives $100,000 prize to launch Day One Project, build nursery at Malawi hospitalHOUSTON — (May 1, 2013) — Rice University bioengineering professors Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden, the winners of the 2013 $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation, are donating their prize money toward the construction of a new neonatal ward at the African hospital that has helped implement Rice’s low-cost, student-designed health care technologies since 2007.Maria Oden (left) and Rebecca Richards-Kortum at Rice University’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen in Houston.The Lemelson-MIT Program today announced that Oden and Richards-Kortum won the prestigious award in honor of their life-saving inventions and pioneering efforts to inspire and lead Rice students to invent and deliver low-cost technological innovations to improve health care for people in developing nations.“When Maria and I learned we had won this award, we both knew exactly how we wanted to use the prize money,” Richards-Kortum said. “Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) in Blantyre (Malawi) is an extraordinary place that is committed to caring for the world’s most vulnerable patients. The physicians there have shown us how simple innovations can dramatically improve neonatal health, and they’ve inspired us to engage our students in solving the challenges of newborn care in low-resource settings.”Oden and Richards-Kortum are two of the driving forces behind the Rice 360° Institute for Global Health Technologies and Rice 360°’s award-winning, hands-on engineering education program Beyond Traditional Borders (BTB). BTB is an engineering-design program founded in 2006 with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. More than 10 percent of Rice undergraduates — including many non-engineering students — have participated in BTB, which has produced 58 low-cost health technologies, including two that are already being broadly distributed by national health authorities in the developing world.“Each year, more than 3 million babies die within the first month of life,” Oden said. “Ninety-nine percent of those deaths happen in the developing world, and many of them could be prevented if hospitals in low-income countries had access to a few low-cost technologies that combat the most common causes of infant mortality.”Oden and Richards-Kortum said the new QECH nursery will provide excellent care for newborns and serve as an innovation hub for the design, evaluation and implementation of Rice 360°’s Day One Project, an ambitious $375,000 effort to improve the lives of newborns in the developing world from the day they are born. Through the Day One Project, Rice 360° aims to create a collection of low-cost, neonatal technologies that a district hospital serving 250,000 people can implement for about $5,000.“Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden have applied outstanding research and motivated our innovative students to use simple technology to improve health care in the world’s poorest regions,” said Rice President David Leebron. “As teachers, they have challenged their students to become leaders who use their skills in the service of others and betterment of our world, in this case saving babies’ lives, and that is a fundamental part of Rice’s mission.”Richards-Kortum, the Stanley C. Moore Professor and chair of Rice’s Department of Bioengineering, also directs Rice 360°. Oden, professor in the practice of bioengineering and director of Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen, coordinates the technical design efforts of BTB students.BTB students work in teams to design technologies that address health care challenges identified by clinicians in the developing world. Each summer, about a dozen Rice students take the year’s most promising BTB designs to Africa and Latin America for evaluation under the guidance of physicians and nurses in clinics and hospitals. More than 90 percent of BTB summer interns plan to incorporate global health activities into their careers after graduation.The Lemelson-MIT Program celebrates outstanding innovators and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention. The program recognized Richards-Kortum and Oden for several BTB technologies, including Rice’s “bubble CPAP” system, or bCPAP, a respiratory support system for newborns that uses low-cost aquarium pumps to generate “continuous positive airway pressure” (CPAP).CPAP technology helps keep a child’s lungs inflated and makes it easier for them to breathe. The technology, which is particularly beneficial for premature newborns with immature lungs and for infants who are fighting severe respiratory infections, is widely available in the developed world, but the machines there cost about $6,000 and are too expensive for most developing world hospitals.Doctors at QECH challenged Rice’s BTB students to come up with a lower-cost alternative, and they created bCPAP, a $400 system that delivers the same therapeutic flow and pressure as systems used in the developed world. BTB evaluated the device at QECH in a clinical trial funded by Saving Lives at Birth, a joint program of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Norwegian government, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Grand Challenges Canada and the World Bank. The clinical trial found that bCPAP greatly improved the survival rates for premature babies. BTB is now working with Malawi’s Ministry of Health to implement Rice’s system in all of the country’s hospitals.Richards-Kortum and Oden said the Day One project is designed to replicate the success of bCPAP. Day One uses the methods pioneered in the bCPAP project to refine, implement and evaluate other neonatal technologies developed at Rice that will address the primary causes of infant mortality.“We are accepting the $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation on behalf of all of the people at Rice, the Texas Medical Center and around the world who have helped to make BTB’s work possible,” Oden said. “Our decision to donate the prize money to QECH is a way to recognize the efforts of our students and collaborators, while ensuring that more life-saving technologies like bCPAP will be used to improve neonatal care in the developing world.”Other BTB innovations recognized by the Lemelson-MIT Program include:DoseRight Syringe Clips, which improve dosing accuracy in the delivery of AIDS-fighting drugs that must be delivered in precise quantities to prevent the transmission of HIV from infected mothers to their babies. The clips are being used in Swaziland, Africa. 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Kilauea eruption an opportunity for undersea scrutiny

first_imghttps://youtu.be/Pfsh5FPiigQCAPTION: Video by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan, taken from a helicopter on July 16, shows lava from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaii as it moves from the volcano to the sea. Morgan and her colleagues spent a week placing ocean-bottom seismic instruments off the southeastern shore of the island. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University)Images for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-1-web-2o6dob0.jpgLava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) Lava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) Rice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) Return to article. Long Description http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-3-web-2bj6qci.jpgRice University researchers who joined colleagues on the Big Island of Hawaii this month to place seismic instruments also took the opportunity to fly over the ongoing eruption of Kilauea July 16. With their pilot and standing from left: Jackie Caplan-Auerbach of Western Washington University, Julia Morgan of Rice, Yang Shen of the University of Rhode Island and David Blank of Rice. (Credit: Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-4-web-23ssyf1.jpgRice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) Lava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) A cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-2-web-28hl50e.jpgLava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) Rice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionBlank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. Photo courtesy of David Blank“The frequency of these failures is very low and the interval between them is very high,” Morgan said. “We think this happened at Kilauea between 25,000 and 50,000 years ago, and we know it happened on (adjacent volcano) Mauna Loa about 100,000 years ago, and probably more than once before that.”While the risk of an imminent avalanche is slim, she said, the eruption, earthquake and aftershocks presented an irresistible opportunity to get a better look at the island’s hidden terrain. Every new quake that occurs along Kilauea’s rift zones and around the perimeter of the Hilina Slump and the bench helps the researchers understand the terrain.Morgan said the United States Geological Survey, which operates the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, has a host of ground-based seismometers but none in the ocean. She said monitors at sea will reveal quakes under the bench that are too small for land seismometers to sense.“The (initial) earthquake seems to have caused earthquakes beneath the outer bench,” Morgan said. “If that outer bench is the buttress to the slump, and that bench is beginning to show seismicity, it’s moving. At what point does it collapse?”The seismometers are deployed around the Hilina Slump, close to shore where lava is entering the ocean and on the outer bench in line with the initial quake. “That way, aftershocks from the earthquake could be picked up and would record characteristics of the fault zone that slipped,” she said. Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan.“They’re still going on,” said Morgan, who returned to Houston last week after seven days aboard a vessel deployed to place instruments and map the area. “In addition, a bunch of earthquakes occurred in other portions of the (island) flank. That’s what really got my attention.”Her interest in geologic structures, particularly relating to volcano deformation and faulting, led her to study the ocean bed off the Big Island’s coast for years. In a 2003 paper, Morgan and her colleagues used marine seismic reflection data to look inside Kilauea’s underwater slope for the boundaries of an active landslide, the Hilina Slump, as well as signs of previous avalanches.The researchers determined that the Hilina Slump is restricted to the upper slopes of the volcano, and the lower slopes consist of a large pile of ancient avalanche debris that was pushed by Kilauea’s sliding, gravity-driven flank into a massive, mile-high bench about 15 miles offshore. This outer bench currently buttresses the Hilina Slump, preventing it from breaking away from the volcano slopes.“We mapped out the geometry and extent of the slump and tried to develop a history of how it came to be,” she said of the paper.“Essentially, Kilauea is a bulldozer sliding out on the ocean crust and scraping off packages of strata that have accumulated,” Morgan said. The Hilina Slump rides on top of the sliding flank, she said. Return to article. Long DescriptionLava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. Photo by David Blank-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Slope failure and volcanic spreading along the submarine south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2003JB002411Instability of Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 4 in “Characteristics of Hawaiian Volcanoes” (USGS): https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp18014Julia Morgan bio: https://earthscience.rice.edu/directory/user/100/Rice Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences: https://earthscience.rice.eduWiess School of Natural Sciences: https://naturalsciences.rice.eduVideo: Lava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Julia Morgan/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionLava flows from a volcanic rift on the Big Island of Hawaii on July 16, as photographed from a helicopter by Rice University Professor Julia Morgan. Rice researchers worked with a team to set seismic instruments on the sea floor that will help analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. Photo by Julia Morgan“If this outer bench is experiencing earthquakes, we want to know what surfaces are experiencing them. Along the base? Within the bench? Some new fault that we didn’t know about? This data will provide us the ability to determine what structures, or faults, are actually slipping.”While Blank worked days on the ship to help deploy the instruments, Morgan chose the night shift for mapping – and a better view of lava hitting the water. After their duty at sea, both took the unique opportunity to book a helicopter flight over the volcano, following the river of lava to the sea.“If you’re following the flows, you can look down and watch the lava tear across the countryside,” she said. “Then you go out to the lava ocean entry. You see these littoral explosions as the lava is flowing into the ocean. You might get a big pulse of lava and suddenly it gets cooled and quenched so rapidly that it just explodes up into the air.”They also spent time talking with locals in Hilo, the largest city on the main island, about the eruption that has already claimed more than 700 homes. “People there know they live with Pele,” Morgan said. “I found they were generally sanguine about it. Sad, but they knew that something like this could happen.“It’s a tragedy, for sure, but it’s also nature doing what nature does.” Rice University researchers who joined colleagues on the Big Island of Hawaii this month to place seismic instruments also took the opportunity to fly over the ongoing eruption of Kilauea July 16. With their pilot and standing from left: Jackie Caplan-Auerbach of Western Washington University, Julia Morgan of Rice, Yang Shen of the University of Rhode Island and David Blank of Rice. (Credit: Rice University) Lava enters the ocean in a photo by Rice University graduate student David Blank, who helped place seismic instruments on the seafloor to analyze earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the ongoing eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: David Blank/Rice University) A cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801) Rice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description Rice University graduate student David Blank poses with the last of 12 ocean-bottom seismometers to be placed off the southeastern shore of the Big Island of Hawaii in July. The seismic instruments are expected to capture information for the next two months about ongoing earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of Kilauea. (Credit: Photo courtesy of David Blank/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-6-web-1webbsy.jpgA cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. (Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1801)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/07/0723_KILAUEA-5-web-1ygq81s.jpgRice University graduate student David Blank and geophysicist Julia Morgan. (Credit: Rice University) ShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to video and high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduKilauea eruption an opportunity for undersea scrutinyRice University researchers help deliver seismometers to analyze Hawaiian volcano, quakesHOUSTON – (July 23, 2018) – Rice University researchers joined a team of scientists placing seismometers under the ocean off the coast of Hawaii, where the ongoing eruption of Kilauea has already claimed more than 700 homes and added to the island’s landmass. The researchers hope for new insight about the landscape under the ocean floor.Video by Rice Professor Julia Morgan, taken from a helicopter on July 16, shows lava from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaii as it moves from the volcano to the sea. Morgan and her colleagues spent a week placing ocean-bottom seismic instruments off the southeastern shore of the island.Julia Morgan, a professor of Earth, environmental and planetary sciences, and student David Blank were awarded a National Science Foundation RAPID grant to join a team of researchers and seed the seafloor with a dozen seismic detectors off the southeastern coast of the island in the wake of the 6.9 magnitude earthquake that occurred at the start of the eruption of Kilauea May 4.The instruments will gather data until September, when they will be retrieved, and are expected to provide an extensive record of earthquakes and aftershocks associated with the eruption of the world’s most active volcano over two months. Return to article. Long DescriptionA cutaway view through Kīlauea’s south flank looking north showing subsurface structures, including the Hilina Slump (pink), ponding sediment (green) and the outer bench (blue) on the ocean bottom that holds the slump in place. Click on the image for a larger version. Source: “Instability of Hawaiian Volcanoes” by Roger Denlinger and Julia Morgan/U.S. Geological Survey“Remarkably, after this earthquake, all the boundaries of the slump also lit up with small earthquakes. These clearly occurred on a different fault than the main earthquake, suggesting that the slump crept downslope during or after that event,” she said.Morgan said the bench appears to be stable, presumably supporting the slump — although if it collapsed, the slump would follow and the results could be catastrophic. “If the slump were to fail catastrophically, it would create an amazing tsunami that would hit the West Coast. We have not seen this in historic times,” she said. Return to article. 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US Student Freed From North Korea Has Severe Brain Injury

first_img Share Show Discussion Otto Frederick Warmbier, a University of Virginia student who has been detained in North Korea since early January, attends a news conference in Pyongyang, North Korea, in this photo released by Kyodo on Feb. 29, 2016. (Mandatory credit REUTERS/Kyodo) US Student Freed From North Korea Has Severe Brain Injury By Reuters June 15, 2017 Updated: June 15, 2017 Share this articlecenter_img WYOMING, Ohio—An American university student who was detained for 17 months in North Korea and suffered a serious neurological injury was “brutalized” while in custody, his father said on Thursday.Despite the “severe” injury, Otto Warmbier, 22, is stable and receiving treatment at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, center spokeswoman Kelly Martin said at a news briefing at Warmbier‘s high school in Wyoming, Ohio.Doctors will provide further details about Warmbier‘s condition on Thursday afternoon.Dr. Jordan Bonomo (L), a Neurointensivist, Dr. Daniel Kanter (C), Medical Director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, and Dr. Brandon Forman (R), a Neurointensive Care Specialist, field questions about the condition and treatment of Otto Warmbier during a news conference at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston) Dr. Jordan Bonomo (L), a Neurointensivist, Dr. Daniel Kanter (C), Medical Director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, and Dr. Brandon Forman (R), a Neurointensive Care Specialist, field questions about the condition and treatment of Otto Warmbier during a news conference at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)Warmbier has been in a coma since March 2016, shortly after he was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor in North Korea, the family said on Tuesday after he was released.He was arrested for trying to steal an item with a propaganda slogan, North Korean media reported. The University of Virginia student was “brutalized and terrorized” by the North Korean regime, his father Fred Warmbier said at the news conference two days after his son was returned.Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston) Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)Fred Warmbier said the family did not believe North Korea’s story, that his son had fallen into a coma after contracting botulism and being given a sleeping pill.“We don’t believe anything they (North Korea) say,” said Fred Warmbier, who was wearing a sport coat Otto Warmbier had worn during a broadcast confession of his crimes last year in North Korea.The New York Times previously cited a senior U.S. official as saying Washington had received intelligence reports Warmbier was repeatedly beaten while in captivity.‘Stunned’Fred Warmbier said he was stunned when told of his son’s condition one week ago.“I don’t know what being in shock is, but I’m pretty sure I was,” Fred Warmbier said, referring to being informed Otto Warmbier was in a coma.Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston) Fred Warmbier, father of Otto Warmbier, during a news conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 15, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)“There is no excuse for any civilized nation to have kept his condition secret and denied him top-notch medical care for so long,” he added.He said his wife, Cindy, had not left their son’s side since his return to the United States.Blue and white ribbons, representing the colors of the high school, were tied around trees and telephone polls throughout Wyoming, a northern Cincinnati suburb of about 8,000 people.Related CoverageSuspected North Korea Drone Spied on US Anti-Missile SystemFred Warmbier said of his son’s release by the regime: “They did not do this out of the kindness of their hearts.”President Donald Trump spoke to Fred Warmbier on Wednesday night, Warmbier said. Trump discussed how Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Joseph Yun, the U.S. State Department’s special envoy on North Korea, worked together to help secure Otto’s release,Warmbier said.By Ginny McCabe  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   US last_img read more


Colonial Pipeline Shuts Down Major Fuel Line Over Harvey

first_img Share this article A pipeline that provides gasoline to the southern United States was shut down Thursday, Aug. 31 amid concerns over Harvey’s effect on its facilities in Louisiana.Georgia-based Colonial Pipeline said in a statement that the pipeline will be shut off on Thursday. It had already shut down its other main line, which transports other types of fuel.Refinery outages triggered the pipeline shutdown.The pipeline provides about 40 percent of the South’s gasoline, connecting to Atlanta, Nashville, Charlotte, Greensboro, Raleigh-Durham, Dulles, and the Baltimore-Washington airports. Houses are seen submerged in flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. (REUTERS/Adrees Latif) Houses are seen submerged in flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. (REUTERS/Adrees Latif) About half of the company’s 26 refineries that supply its pipeline are located between Houston and Lake Charles, Louisiana.“Once Colonial is able to ensure that its facilities are safe to operate and refiners in Lake Charles and points east have the ability to move product to Colonial, our system will resume operations,” the operator said. It estimates being able to return to service from Houston on Sunday.Parts of Colonial Pipeline were shut down for several days during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005.Volunteer rescuers evacuate people from a flooded residential area during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Floodwaters have breached a levee south of the city of Houston, officials said Tuesday, urging residents to leave the area immediately.  (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images) Volunteer rescuers evacuate people from a flooded residential area during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 29, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)Colonial, by volume, is the largest pipeline operator in the United States, delivering more than 100 million gallons of fuel and gas each day.Some experts said that the shutdown might spike gas prices.Colonial, however, notes on its website that it is one part of the fuel delivery system. “There are multiple means of supplying the market to mitigate concerns with supply, including other pipelines, trucks, and barges.”According to AAA, nationwide gas prices have climbed by about 3 percent in the last week to $2.40 for a gallon of regular.Josh Carrasco, a spokesman for AAA AutoClub Group, told NBC that gas prices for Labor Day will be the highest since 2014.“At this point, we’re at a wait-and-see situation to see how much damage is done to those refineries in the Gulf Coast area,” Carrasco said. “And then we’ll have more clarity down the road.”Harvey made landfall in southern Texas as a Category 4 hurricane the night of Aug. 25 and dumped a huge amount of rain—more than 50 inches in some parts—triggering widespread flooding in Houston and other areas. Louisiana was also hit by the storm, albeit not as hard. Overall, 32,000 people have been sent to shelters, and over 30 people have been confirmed dead. Colonial Pipeline Shuts Down Major Fuel Line Over Harvey By Jack Phillips August 31, 2017 Updated: August 31, 2017 Share  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   center_img US (Colonial Pipeline) Show Discussionlast_img read more


Teen Firefighter Trainee Battling Cancer—With Some Help From His Friends

first_img US News The Hy-View Fire Department at work (http://www.hyviewfire.org) Show Discussion Share this article Sharecenter_img  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Teen Firefighter Trainee Battling Cancer—With Some Help From His Friends By Chris Jasurek March 8, 2018 Updated: March 8, 2018 Sixteen-year-old Timothy Richardson is on leave from the Hy-View Fire Company’s Explorer program, while he fights leukemia—in a different shirt every day.Timothy is the son of a firefighter, and all he has ever wanted to do with his life was to follow in his dad’s footsteps—risking his own safety to help others.“Knowing that people are on their worst days, just knowing that, and you can help them in their worst times, it really just gives you a sense of pride,” Timothy told WGRZ.It will be a while before Timothy resumes his fireman training, though.Timothy will be spending a lot of time flat on his back in a hospital bed while chemotherapy drugs are pumped into his body to battle the cancer cells. The Maryvale, New York High School junior will spend the next month in Oishei Children’s Hospital in Buffalo. He will be under treatment for a total of about two years.Timothy could have asked for any kind of help. He could have asked for money, free transportation and lodging for his parents, anything. His fellow firefighters would have happily done whatever they could.What kind of help has he asked for? T-shirts.While he’s in the hospital, Timothy hopes to be able to wear the shirt of a different firehouse every day.“I put the feelers out, town of Hamburg, town of Amherst, West Seneca, anybody that I knew and the outpouring has just been phenomenal,” said Hy-View safety officer and Explorer advisor Joe Lent told WKYC.“I didn’t expect anything less. Timmy’s going to have a lot of shirts to wear.”Richardson’s father, Matthew is a firefighter at U-Crest Fire Company in Cheektowaga. His sister Michelle, 19, is a former firefighter Explorer. Now Timothy is learning that all firefighters are part of his family.“He knows he has his brotherhood of the fire department behind him,” Timothy’s mother, Deanna, told WKYC.From a Runny Nose to a Dangerous DiseaseTimothy’s ordeal started on Feb. 15 when he had a doctor check out what looked like a sinus infection, according to his Facebook page.He was back in less than a week with swollen glands in his neck.A series of biopsies over the next few weeks eventually revealed the dreaded diagnosis: the teen had leukemia.Doctors are adamant that Timothy has leukemia, not lymphoma. Leukemia is much more easily treatable.His Facebook page, “Timmy’s Battle,” says, “Timmy is allowed to have visitors and is encouraged to have visitors.” The family just asks that people call ahead to make sure he is feeling well enough at the moment.For anyone who wants to send a T-shirt: Tim’s size is mens XL and his address is:Timothy Richardson at John R. Oishei Children’s Hospital818 Ellicott St Buffalo NY 14203ATT: J 12 SouthRoom 1210From NTD.tvRecommended Video: Snowboarder Survives Avalanche in Canadalast_img read more